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Status after NG service

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  • Status after NG service

    I am often asked if I am a veteran. I served in the NG from 1976 to 1984 and received an honerable d/c. If I am not a veteran what am I. How do you answer that question since during that time I could have been activated if the need arose to serve my country. I ofter feel uncomfortable answereing this question. What can my children put on college applications etc. with there father's status. Am I entitled to any benefits. Thank you.

  • #2
    Re: Status after NG service

    Originally posted by John D. Riccione View Post
    I am often asked if I am a veteran. I served in the NG from 1976 to 1984 and received an honerable d/c. If I am not a veteran what am I. How do you answer that question since during that time I could have been activated if the need arose to serve my country. I ofter feel uncomfortable answereing this question. What can my children put on college applications etc. with there father's status. Am I entitled to any benefits. Thank you.
    Currently, if you never served on active duty (outside of Basic and AIT and two-weeks annual training), the term "veteran" is not applicable. I would respond that I am not a veteran per current definition but have served in the Army National Guard for 8 years.

    There is current legislation enabling that title be carried forward to Reserve component members; so good luck. But that is for only Reserve component members who complete 20 years of service and never was federally activated; not 8. Again, it is not about the title but if it brings forth certain entitlements and privileges; then so be it. The last four years, current politics has been moving towards that direction in giving everyone their due; even if they have not earned it or it was tradition since the beginning of man.

    http://www.ngaus.org/newsroom/news/v...roduced-senate <--Link

    Sen. Mark Pryor, D-Ark., and Sen. John Boozman, R-Ark., last month reintroduced the Honor America’s Guard-Reserve Retirees Act, which would give those with 20 years of service in the Guard and Reserve the honor of being called a veteran.Under current law, the definition of a veteran applies only to service members who have served on active duty.
    The bill would amend this definition to allow qualifying individuals to salute when the Star Spangled Banner is played, march in veterans’ parades, and be recognized as a veteran by other veterans, Pryor and Boozman said.
    “It’s unacceptable that these brave men and women have served our country proudly for over two decades, but through no fault of their own, are not allowed to call themselves veterans,” Pryor said.
    “National Guard and Reserve members who selflessly serve in defense of our country should to be honored for their sacrifice,” said Boozman, a member of the Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs. “The men and women who have dedicated two decades of their lives to this nation deserve this recognition. ”
    The legislation is cost-neutral, and would not provide any additional financial benefits.
    An identical bill (H.R. 679) is already under consideration in the House. Similar legislation has twice passed the House only to falter in the Senate.
    Veteran status for all Guard retirees is a NGAUS legislative priority.
    - See more at: http://www.ngaus.org/newsroom/news/v....XPtdoSli.dpuf


    http://www.eldercounselblog.com/2012...%80%9D-status/

    Does National Guard Service Qualify for “Veteran” Status?

    April 16, 20128:12 pmadminVeterans BenefitsIn order to qualify for Veterans Benefits, in particular, Compensation or Pension, an individual must meet the definition of veteran, and must also meet the active duty requirements contained in the Code of Federal Regulations, specifically 38 C.F.R. §3.6. Often the question is asked whether a person who served in the National Guard can qualify for Veterans Benefits. The answer, with applicable Code citations, is below.
    National Guard members are only eligible for VA benefits stemming from their federal service, which includes periods during which they were ordered into federal service by the President under 10 U.S.C.S. §12401 to perform duty under the provisions of 32 U.S.C.S. §§316, 502, 503, 504 or 505. National Guard members who are ordered into the active service of a state are not eligible for VA benefits related to that service. The active duty definitions are found in 38 C.F.R. §3.6, and for National Guard, see specifically (c)(3).


    I been combat deployed numerous times and nearly 15 years of active service but I still feel like a rookie and not a veteran until I get 20 active years lol.
    Last edited by Chief Kemosabe; April 14th, 2013, 01:43 PM.

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