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  • Officer duties benefiting the Civilian Sector

    Seeking some advice here from all the Lt's, Cpt's, etc.. that frequent this site. I've recently graduated college and am on my way to earning my commission in the PAANG. I earned a degree in Human/Exercise Physiology but due to financial restrictions I'm unable to pursue my goal of Physical Therapy school at this time. I was curious as to what jobs/careers some of the officers on here possess that they may have gotten specifically BECAUSE they are officers in the NG even though they earned their degree in an unrelated field. I know the army preachers that officers have the responsibility, duty, integrity, etc.. to make great administrators in the civilian sector but I'm seeking personal experience from among the ranks that can attest to having a fulfilling, rewarding, and salary competitive career based on their duties in the NG as an officer.

    Thank you,

  • #2
    Re: Officer duties benefiting the Civilian Sector

    All the briefs I had to give, so sales is the way to go!!

    What current interests would you like to pursue?
    Last edited by SF Hunter; May 29th, 2013, 06:21 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: Officer duties benefiting the Civilian Sector

      I'm interested in a job were I'll have structured duties to perform. For example having a deadline that will put me under a little stress but easily able to fulfill the duties and feel accomplished. I'd like a leadership role where I'd have responsibilities of either personnel or equipment while at the same time having to answer to someone and I don't mind being told what to do. Ideally, I'd like an array of duties as well, I don't mind sitting behind a computer or a desk for an extended time but I couldn't do it all day every day. I'd like to travel as well, whether it be state wide or out of state.

      I've explored jobs with the Department of Transportation, and jobs within the commonwealth of Pa government, etc...

      I'm throwing a lot out there in hopes of someone saying, "Oh I do that, look into this career..."

      thanks again, guys.

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      • #4
        Re: Officer duties benefiting the Civilian Sector

        I guess I fall outside the parameters of your scenario since my degree is in line with my job but...

        I interviewed for my current job as a contractor at DHS with a retired Army O-6. The vast majority of the conversation we had in the interview was about Ft Benning/OCS. (Also, having a clearance was a prerequisite to apply, which being an NG officer provided me.)

        Would I have gotten the job relying on my academic background/ experience alone? I can't say. I work alongside a lot of veterans, though. The company I work for is veteran-owned (mostly retired Army O's) and having a mil background definitely has helped me stand out. Retired FGOs love to reminisce about their LT days.

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        • #5
          Re: Officer duties benefiting the Civilian Sector

          Originally posted by Nodoz View Post
          Seeking some advice here from all the Lt's, Cpt's, etc.. that frequent this site. I've recently graduated college and am on my way to earning my commission in the PAANG. I earned a degree in Human/Exercise Physiology but due to financial restrictions I'm unable to pursue my goal of Physical Therapy school at this time. I was curious as to what jobs/careers some of the officers on here possess that they may have gotten specifically BECAUSE they are officers in the NG even though they earned their degree in an unrelated field. I know the army preachers that officers have the responsibility, duty, integrity, etc.. to make great administrators in the civilian sector but I'm seeking personal experience from among the ranks that can attest to having a fulfilling, rewarding, and salary competitive career based on their duties in the NG as an officer.

          Thank you,
          Well, I graduated with a BS Computer Science but having a security clearance due to my service in the National Guard definitely helped. I currently work as a software engineer for a major defense contractor in the MD area. I was selected by my business unit to be a member of our Business Capture team as a collateral duty. Basically, you interact with clients, demo some proprietary R&D products, and try to get the contract. Being a member of service gives you a tremendous advantage in being selected for client interaction roles especially if one of your major clients is the DoD.

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          • #6
            Re: Officer duties benefiting the Civilian Sector

            Originally posted by Nodoz View Post
            I'm seeking personal experience from among the ranks that can attest to having a fulfilling, rewarding, and salary competitive career based on their duties in the NG as an officer.

            Thank you,
            To be honest the answer is: NONE.
            Your goal is to get a great civilian job based on a commission you do not have. That and the assumption that you branch (I mean graduate BOLC 2 to 2.5 years down the road from RIGHT HERE RIGHT NOW) something that hiring managers are just in dire need of.

            It doesn't work that easy. "Fulfilling, rewarding, and salary"; IE a career; is a process. It is not something you are going to gee whiz a company with. Maybe someone with a BS degree, 8 years of military experience as an officer, with a deployment under their belt could pull your idea off. Right now you aspire to be a fully qualified 2LT (Basic, OCS, BOLC - again doing this in ~2.5 years is about how long it takes). Congratulations guess what you've earned? What the United States Army considers an entry level position.

            You want realistic? Let's re-examine furthering that education. Say maybe on the Army's dime, or at least letting the Army put a dent in it. Maybe see if your Unit can get you on orders from time to time. Or branch something like MI and get a security clearance out of it. Broaden your experience (resume) and get some tools in your tool belt.

            I'm not trying to beat you down here, I just want you to give me a more realistic goal and maybe people here can give you an idea on how to attain it.

            scj

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            • #7
              Re: Officer duties benefiting the Civilian Sector

              Originally posted by scjohnny View Post
              To be honest the answer is: NONE.
              Your goal is to get a great civilian job based on a commission you do not have. That and the assumption that you branch (I mean graduate BOLC 2 to 2.5 years down the road from RIGHT HERE RIGHT NOW) something that hiring managers are just in dire need of.

              It doesn't work that easy. "Fulfilling, rewarding, and salary"; IE a career; is a process. It is not something you are going to gee whiz a company with. Maybe someone with a BS degree, 8 years of military experience as an officer, with a deployment under their belt could pull your idea off. Right now you aspire to be a fully qualified 2LT (Basic, OCS, BOLC - again doing this in ~2.5 years is about how long it takes). Congratulations guess what you've earned? What the United States Army considers an entry level position.

              You want realistic? Let's re-examine furthering that education. Say maybe on the Army's dime, or at least letting the Army put a dent in it. Maybe see if your Unit can get you on orders from time to time. Or branch something like MI and get a security clearance out of it. Broaden your experience (resume) and get some tools in your tool belt.

              I'm not trying to beat you down here, I just want you to give me a more realistic goal and maybe people here can give you an idea on how to attain it.

              scj
              There are plenty of people with BS degrees, 8 years of military experience, and a deployment under their belt ... still unemployed or under-employed.

              To most employers, your military service as a commissioned officer is simply going to be a check block. In my experience, it goes under "preferred qualifications" but you still have to meet the "basic qualifications". This is what scjohnny is referring to when he says, "let's re-examine furthering that education..."

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              • #8
                Re: Officer duties benefiting the Civilian Sector

                Thanks

                for something I already knew, hence why I was asking for opinions from individuals who had a little bit more knowledge and experience than someone with a yellow bar...no offense of course, sir..

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                • #9
                  Re: Officer duties benefiting the Civilian Sector

                  SCJohnny provided an awesome response. Personally, I do not know anything about you but if you are just a young 20-something, college graduate with no experience; you will be experiencing a tough job market that is very competitive.

                  I am 47 and been around the block more than once and have worked in the private and public sectors for many years.

                  I am an AD officer with nearly 6 years as one and I know a lot of AD Captains who are 26-28 that are leaving the military this year and they are very nervous of what is out there. I know one that is a West Point Grad and did not get selected to Captain and he is petrified as well. So even those combat experience types have immediate future unknowns.

                  I returned to AD after establishing a good resume of private sector experience and making in the mid-70ks and still I was broke lol. I entered the service in 2004 making in the late 30ks. Fortunately, things have worked out and I have surpassed my civilian earnings, completed a master's and will be making pay with 24 years of service next year. I am not worried about returning back to civilian life because my degrees are in IT and I have solid military officer combat experience.

                  Now that will look good on a resume but there is still no guarantee on getting hired. When I left the Marines in 91, I was piggy backing job from job to increase my earnings and still feeling my way out. You might have some turmoil during this period but at least you have a plan.
                  Last edited by Chief Kemosabe; May 29th, 2013, 07:42 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Officer duties benefiting the Civilian Sector

                    If you're looking for a linear relationship between National Guard military status and civilian employment, then enlist in an MOS with civilian application (e.g., diesel mechanic). The benefits of officer service are indirect, and often take time to develop.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Officer duties benefiting the Civilian Sector

                      Originally posted by Nodoz View Post
                      Thanks

                      for something I already knew, hence why I was asking for opinions from individuals who had a little bit more knowledge and experience than someone with a yellow bar...no offense of course, sir..
                      LOL. Roger, Candidate. I guess I won't discuss my Military Contractor job, since I don't have an knowledge or experience or anything...

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                      • #12
                        Re: Officer duties benefiting the Civilian Sector

                        Originally posted by Lance13A View Post
                        LOL. Roger, Candidate. I guess I won't discuss my Military Contractor job, since I don't have an knowledge or experience or anything...
                        Haha, +1....I learned pretty quickly not to make this assumption.

                        OP, I've found in the Guard that rank and civilian experience often do not correspond. Lots of E-4s and E-5s in my unit are way more successful than me (and that 2LTs can be more knowledgeable/experienced than 1LTs and CPTs).

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                        • #13
                          Re: Officer duties benefiting the Civilian Sector

                          Originally posted by Nodoz View Post
                          Thanks

                          for something I already knew, hence why I was asking for opinions from individuals who had a little bit more knowledge and experience than someone with a yellow bar...no offense of course, sir..
                          No offense taken. Please let us know how it goes.

                          2LT SCJ
                          (40 year old butter bar - 18 years of service - IT Systems Specialist for the State of Alabama (yeah that job you're looking for))

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                          • #14
                            Re: Officer duties benefiting the Civilian Sector

                            My apologies, it seems you're 110% right about that. Every retention or readiness job is for E5 E6 only, if only I would have known this at the time. SOL to me.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Officer duties benefiting the Civilian Sector

                              Originally posted by Nodoz View Post
                              My apologies, it seems you're 110% right about that. Every retention or readiness job is for E5 E6 only, if only I would have known this at the time. SOL to me.
                              Usually Readiness at the company level is an E7 slot.

                              Training and Supply are usually E6 slots.

                              I thought your original post dealt with opportunities in the civilian sector so how did this AGR issue get introduced into this thread?

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