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  • What can a 35M do in the civilian world?

    Will be taking the ASVAB and the DLAB to see if I can qualify for 35M, and I was wondering what kind of career options were available for that certain MOS.

    The National Guard handbook I received on different MOSs were ... vague to say in the least on this subject.

    So I was wondering if anyone could shine some light on this subject.

  • #2
    Re: What can a 35M do in the civilian world?

    Originally posted by chakken View Post
    What can a 35M do in the civilian world?
    A 35M can put those state and federal education benefits to their intended use and get a degree from a reputable school and then, hopefully, find a job in the field of his/her choosing. Just like an 88M, or 11B.

    Choosing an MOS in order to gain the upper hand in civilian employment is a recipe for disaster. Simply having been to AIT is probably not going to "make" your resume. Decide what MOS interests you in and of itself, then decide what civilian career field interests you. If you have a degree AND military experience, you may be bringing something unique to the table. Or not; who knows. But your AIT completion certificate from Drill Sergeant Snowball is worth just about zero in the corporate world.

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    • #3
      Re: What can a 35M do in the civilian world?

      jwarren makes a good point. Utilizing your education benefits is a wise choice. If you're not sure what benefits you qualify for, you can take a look here. There's also a couple of stickies under the Benefits forum that explain the education incentives the National Guard is offering. Here's a direct link: Benefits

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: What can a 35M do in the civilian world?

        Originally posted by jwarren View Post
        Choosing an MOS in order to gain the upper hand in civilian employment is a recipe for disaster. Simply having been to AIT is probably not going to "make" your resume. Decide what MOS interests you in and of itself, then decide what civilian career field interests you. If you have a degree AND military experience, you may be bringing something unique to the table. Or not; who knows. But your AIT completion certificate from Drill Sergeant Snowball is worth just about zero in the corporate world.
        What if you are looking for a civilian career in intelligence analysis? I understand this was not the OP's question but I am wondering for myself. Thanks!

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: What can a 35M do in the civilian world?

          Originally posted by jwarren View Post
          A 35M can put those state and federal education benefits to their intended use and get a degree from a reputable school and then, hopefully, find a job in the field of his/her choosing. Just like an 88M, or 11B.

          Choosing an MOS in order to gain the upper hand in civilian employment is a recipe for disaster. Simply having been to AIT is probably not going to "make" your resume. Decide what MOS interests you in and of itself, then decide what civilian career field interests you. If you have a degree AND military experience, you may be bringing something unique to the table. Or not; who knows. But your AIT completion certificate from Drill Sergeant Snowball is worth just about zero in the corporate world.
          +1.

          Originally posted by chakken View Post
          Will be taking the ASVAB and the DLAB to see if I can qualify for 35M, and I was wondering what kind of career options were available for that certain MOS.

          The National Guard handbook I received on different MOSs were ... vague to say in the least on this subject.

          So I was wondering if anyone could shine some light on this subject.
          If you have a degree in engineering or computer science, military experience, and a TS clearance, you'll be set in the civilian world.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: What can a 35M do in the civilian world?

            Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
            +1.



            If you have a degree in engineering or computer science, military experience, and a TS clearance, you'll be set in the civilian world.
            We need a sticky for this. The undergraduate degrees worth having are:

            1) Engineering (civil and chemical ONLY if you are interested in those specific disciplines; all others should choose electrical or mechanical and most should avoid "hybrid" disciplines such as biomedical). Make sure to take some computer programming/development/database electives.
            2) Computer Science
            3) hard sciences (especially physics) -- augment with programming/development/database electives
            4) math major + finance/econ minor (make sure you learn to write some code -- see a pattern here?)

            "But I want to go to [medical/law/clown] school" -- who cares? Two guys with JDs from Rutgers walk into an interview with a law firm. One has a degree in engineering and the other has a degree in sociology. Both of them get laughed out of the interviewer's office because they just interviewed a guy with a JD from Harvard who has a better haircut. Which of the two losers has a prospect of getting a well-paying job in a field OTHER than law?

            P.S.: There are legal disciplines which value quantitative backgrounds. See "patent law."

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            • #7
              Re: What can a 35M do in the civilian world?

              Originally posted by jwarren View Post
              We need a sticky for this. The undergraduate degrees worth having are:

              1) Engineering (civil and chemical ONLY if you are interested in those specific disciplines; all others should choose electrical or mechanical and most should avoid "hybrid" disciplines such as biomedical). Make sure to take some computer programming/development/database electives.
              2) Computer Science
              3) hard sciences (especially physics) -- augment with programming/development/database electives
              4) math major + finance/econ minor (make sure you learn to write some code -- see a pattern here?)

              "But I want to go to [medical/law/clown] school" -- who cares? Two guys with JDs from Rutgers walk into an interview with a law firm. One has a degree in engineering and the other has a degree in sociology. Both of them get laughed out of the interviewer's office because they just interviewed a guy with a JD from Harvard who has a better haircut. Which of the two losers has a prospect of getting a well-paying job in a field OTHER than law?

              P.S.: There are legal disciplines which value quantitative backgrounds. See "patent law."
              This definitely needs to be stickied in the Education, Careers, and Money for School sub-forum.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: What can a 35M do in the civilian world?

                Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
                This definitely needs to be stickied in the Education, Careers, and Money for School sub-forum.

                I see your guys' point, but this is edging on the subjective.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: What can a 35M do in the civilian world?

                  Originally posted by RyCass View Post
                  I see your guys' point, but this is edging on the subjective.
                  I think what you may have been trying to say is that while the advice may be true, it may not be within someone's ability.

                  I can level with someone who attempts this route and puts forth 100% effort but could not hack it. What I cannot level with is someone who chooses a major because it seems "fun" and it is what "interests" them knowing full well that their chances of obtaining meaningful employment are just about zero. There has to be some level of individual responsibility for one's life choices.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: What can a 35M do in the civilian world?

                    Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
                    I think what you may have been trying to say is that while the advice may be true, it may not be within someone's ability.

                    I can level with someone who attempts this route and puts forth 100% effort but could not hack it. What I cannot level with is someone who chooses a major because it seems "fun" and it is what "interests" them knowing full well that their chances of obtaining meaningful employment are just about zero. There has to be some level of individual responsibility for one's life choices.
                    Sort of. My point is that it is a tricky business officially advertising a list of degrees that are "worth having", when "worth" or "intentions" or "motivations" for choosing a degree are subjective. You can have your opinions, like you stated above. They are not without their own truth, but they are what they are: opinions. It's what makes America great! Everyone can choose their own path and for their own reasons, whether or not someone agrees with the logic. I just don't think we could objectively put a list like that in a sticky.

                    Since we are offering our own opinions, it is my personal belief, OP, that a student should pursue something that they can 1) follow through with (i.e. is interesting/inspiring enough to them), and 2) allows them to live the life they choose. What this means is that, sometimes, it's not about the monetary gain but of personal fulfillment. If having job security and a paycheck is a priority, then that would definitely discount a degree in basket weaving. . Bottom line, find something that you are good at/like to do and can help you sustain the lifestyle you are comfortable with. Anything short of this is setting yourself up with frustration and, potentially, failure. If you can get your education in something that combines your Military skills, well, that's just icing on the cake!

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