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How do I join with a history of anxiety?

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  • How do I join with a history of anxiety?

    I was just wondering what are the steps I need to take in order to join with my history of anxiety?

    Background:
    Currently I am 17 and will be graduating high school in May. Back in about 6th grade I was dealing with some panic anxiety issues because I was going to be going to a new school and moving in with my grandpa. And when my doctor heard about it he sent me to psychiatrist and then the psychiatrist prescribed me Zoloft. I stopped seeing the psychiatrist because my anxiety was gone. Then I changed doctors and he saw my anxiety history and kept me on Zoloft and then prescribed me Ativan because I told him that I would have some anxiety for tests or stuff of that nature. I have changed doctors about two times now and they just kept prescribing the meds and I stopped taking them because my anxiety was gone. Finally, my new doctor told me he doesn't like prescribing them I the next time I see him I will ask him to stop prescribing it because I know that it is a disqualifies me from joining.

    I plan on going to the Junior college in town for a couple of years because from the qualifications I have to be off for two years anyway. I also plan on asking the psychiatrist to write me a note saying that I am fine from my anxiety. If anybody has any other suggestions for what I should it would gladly be appreciated.

  • #2
    Re: How do I join with a history of anxiety?

    There are hundreds of threads on anxiety.

    Here is one.

    http://www.nationalguard.com/forums/...hlight=anxiety

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    • #3
      Re: How do I join with a history of anxiety?

      Thanks

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: How do I join with a history of anxiety?

        Originally posted by adhaun1119 View Post
        I was just wondering what are the steps I need to take in order to join with my history of anxiety?

        Background:
        Currently I am 17 and will be graduating high school in May. Back in about 6th grade I was dealing with some panic anxiety issues because I was going to be going to a new school and moving in with my grandpa. And when my doctor heard about it he sent me to psychiatrist and then the psychiatrist prescribed me Zoloft. I stopped seeing the psychiatrist because my anxiety was gone. Then I changed doctors and he saw my anxiety history and kept me on Zoloft and then prescribed me Ativan because I told him that I would have some anxiety for tests or stuff of that nature. I have changed doctors about two times now and they just kept prescribing the meds and I stopped taking them because my anxiety was gone. Finally, my new doctor told me he doesn't like prescribing them I the next time I see him I will ask him to stop prescribing it because I know that it is a disqualifies me from joining.

        I plan on going to the Junior college in town for a couple of years because from the qualifications I have to be off for two years anyway. I also plan on asking the psychiatrist to write me a note saying that I am fine from my anxiety. If anybody has any other suggestions for what I should it would gladly be appreciated.
        Seriously--Before you do anything you need to read this post over again. Do you really want to join the Armed Forces knowing what your history is? You were referred by a general practitioner to a psychiatrist, which in turn diagnosed and prescribed you Zoloft. Not only that you also have a long history of prescriptions.

        What do you think joining the National Guard is all about? Handing food and supplies out to natural disaster victims? National Guard soldiers have to go through the same training as everyone else does in every branch of the Armed Forces. You'll be subjected to the same rigorous, strenuous, stressful environment as Active Duty/Regular Army soldiers. You'll have to deploy and engage in generally, and in some cases, literally the same kind of dangerous missions as Active Duty/Regular Army soldiers.

        You need to seriously think about what you're up against before you read someone else's post on this discussion board where someone else may or may not have gotten a waiver or whatever the case may be.

        Disorders with psychotic features

        The causes for rejection for appointment, enlistment, and induction are disorders with psychotic features.

        Neurotic, anxiety , mood, somatoform, dissociative, or factitious disorders

        The causes for rejection for appointment, enlistment, and induction are a history of such disorders resulting in any or all of the below:

        a. Admission to a hospital or residential facility.

        b. Care by a physician or other mental health professional for more than 6 months.

        c. Symptoms or behavior of a repeated nature that impaired social, school, or work efficiency.


        Last edited by VICEROY06; May 1st, 2013, 09:36 AM.

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        • #5
          Re: How do I join with a history of anxiety?

          OP, you really need to think hard about this one... You have the real chance of going to combat and getting shot at. Do you think you will serve yourself or your battle buddies if you wig-out during a crucial time?

          Only you know what is best for you. There are ways around it but seriously, look at you and go from there.

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          • #6
            Re: How do I join with a history of anxiety?

            You don't.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: How do I join with a history of anxiety?

              Originally posted by adhaun1119 View Post
              I was just wondering what are the steps I need to take in order to join with my history of anxiety?

              Background:
              Currently I am 17 and will be graduating high school in May. Back in about 6th grade I was dealing with some panic anxiety issues because I was going to be going to a new school and moving in with my grandpa. And when my doctor heard about it he sent me to psychiatrist and then the psychiatrist prescribed me Zoloft. I stopped seeing the psychiatrist because my anxiety was gone. Then I changed doctors and he saw my anxiety history and kept me on Zoloft and then prescribed me Ativan because I told him that I would have some anxiety for tests or stuff of that nature. I have changed doctors about two times now and they just kept prescribing the meds and I stopped taking them because my anxiety was gone. Finally, my new doctor told me he doesn't like prescribing them I the next time I see him I will ask him to stop prescribing it because I know that it is a disqualifies me from joining.

              I plan on going to the Junior college in town for a couple of years because from the qualifications I have to be off for two years anyway. I also plan on asking the psychiatrist to write me a note saying that I am fine from my anxiety. If anybody has any other suggestions for what I should it would gladly be appreciated.
              If what we've said didn't convince you to take a U-turn I can paint a picture for you--based on a true story.

              You'll be dealing with some of the rigors of reception hall or you might just scrape past reception and go for the full Monty downrange in a training battalion. You're without your meds, which will cause a chemical imbalance, and you have an episode. Then at a moment of weakness you'll ramble off some of your history to a Drill Sergeant. The Drill Sergeant will take your boot laces and your shoe laces from your running shoes from you and assign a watch to you. at least two soldiers will watch you on shifts at all times. 12 or more soldiers in all to watch you around the clock--Watch you when you sleep, watch you when you take a bath, watch you when you use the bathroom.

              You won't be going back to reception and wait to be separated. They're going to send you to the wing of the hospital that's full of padded rooms. You'll spend the next two to three months being escorted around to various case managers that will ask you a truckload of questions and have you fill out and sign a truckload of forms.

              You'll have to attend special separation meetings and transition meetings. Meanwhile they'll be researching your medical history and find every little detail of your medicated past--this is so they can provide evidence that you have a history of psychological issues prior to enlistment, so they won't have to pay you a dime after they discharge you.

              This is all provided that you decided to withhold your medical history during the moment of truth at MEPS. However, with your history, if you decide to tell the truth about any part of your history they will pull the plug on you immediately. If your recruiter isn't already there waiting for you they'll have you call your recruiter to come get you and send you back to the waiting room. There's a great possibility that your recruiter's office will be an hour or more drive from MEPS. And your recruiter may be tied up dealing with other recruits, so you'll be waiting around for hours and hours and hours at MEPS until someone can come pick you up. You can't just doze off or slouch around in your seat and you can't call your mommy up on your cellphone as there are no cellphones allowed at MEPS. One of the facilitators will always be circulating through the area to make sure recruits aren't engaged in mischief or sleeping.
              Last edited by VICEROY06; May 3rd, 2013, 08:54 AM.

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