Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Joining the Guard: medical roadblocks Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Joining the Guard: medical roadblocks

    I'll try to make this as short as possible. I am 29 years old and interested in joining the National Guard. I am in above average physical condition for my age, exercising at least 3x per week and running 10 miles a week in between as well (usually 4 miles one day, 3 miles on the other two). I have been researching joining the Guard online and have run into two medical issues that pertain to me that I am afraid might hinder my ability to enlist. First, I broke a bone in my left hand roughly 7 years ago (index finger, metacarpal) and didn't get it set correctly by a doctor, hence it has healed yet healed incorrectly, leaving a large knot on the top of my hand. It doesn't hinder function-ability of my hand, but it definitely doesn't look normal, and MEPS doctors would not miss it. Getting it fixed on my own time isn't something that is out of the question if I thought it was the only thing holding me up from joining, however the second medical condition that pertains to me is the one that is the most disheartening: I have a history of migraine headaches, and I have read that a history of these and a history of prescription meds are disqualifying. Sounds pretty cut and dry, but I've also read many, many posts regarding medical waivers for various conditions. So, will a history of migraine headaches hold me up forever from joining any branch of service? Even if it's not forever, given my age time is definitely not on my side! But honestly what I'm looking for is pragmatic and forthright advice on where I should go from here, and if the military is even an option at this point. I have had headaches my entire life, but have always been a functioning, consistently employed member of society, and when they come, I deal with them. Believe me I'm kicking myself for ever seeing a doctor about anything after researching enlistment requirements! Anyway, thank you for taking the time to read my post and for your help and advice in regards to this matter.

  • #2
    Re: Joining the Guard: medical roadblocks

    Honestly, will these health issues become problematic without treatment through extended periods of time? (No meds)

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Joining the Guard: medical roadblocks

      Originally posted by Orelladanza View Post
      Honestly, will these health issues become problematic without treatment through extended periods of time? (No meds)
      I do not believe so. The headaches that I have dealt with my entire life are usually more of a nuisance than anything else, with only rare instances (like the one in October 2012) where they were debilitating. I feel like I can deal with the many challenges I would encounter in BCT and moving forward, and currently do not take daily medication for the prevention of these headaches. I have a prescription for them, but it's medication I only take when needed, which is roughly twice a month, at the onset of a headache. I could probably get by with advil or aspirin in those instances, it's just that I have the medication from my doctor, so I take it as needed. This is also coming from someone that had no idea how easily one could limit themselves in the military through doctors visits prior to joining, lesson learned there to any of you younger individuals reading this!

      As far as my hand goes, it's personally a non-issue; My left hand functions as well as my right, it just has an ugly knot at the top, with my ring finger knuckle sitting at the back of my fist. It's just something I know a doctor performing a physical would notice. Thanks again for taking the time to read this and follow up with me, I really appreciate it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Joining the Guard: medical roadblocks

        I don't believe that these issues should hold you back. I'm not an expert, but being honest with a recruiter about these topics, in addition to your assurance they will be a non-factor should not bar you from enlistment. More soldiers than not these days would have never gotten in had they been completely transparent at MEPS. A recruiter should be able to help you with these issues further. But if you do not foresee these things becoming problematic and/or hindrances during duty or training over extended periods of time I would probably turn a cheek to them.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Joining the Guard: medical roadblocks

          Thank you for your insight and guidance, I'll take your advice and try to keep this post updated for future recruits who may be facing the same obstacles.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Joining the Guard: medical roadblocks

            I read the Army Times today and the main article discusses that an immediate 25,000 troops will have to leave the service. And this will be based on medical, misconduct, PT failure/overweight issues.

            The hammer is falling fast.
            http://www.armytimes.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Joining the Guard: medical roadblocks

              I read the Army Times today and the main article discusses that an immediate 25,000 troops will have to leave the service. And this will be based on medical, misconduct, PT failure/overweight issues.

              The hammer is falling fast.
              http://www.armytimes.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Joining the Guard: medical roadblocks

                Originally posted by Chief Kemosabe View Post
                I read the Army Times today and the main article discusses that an immediate 25,000 troops will have to leave the service. And this will be based on medical, misconduct, PT failure/overweight issues.

                The hammer is falling fast.
                http://www.armytimes.com/
                Yeah. It's not going to be easy enlisting during this drawback period. I do not condone lying. If these issues, for whatever reason, do hinder your ability to perform basic duties at some point you may face a forced discharge and possible inquisition of prior health issues. BUT. Like I said, speak with a recruiter. If he says you are DQ then try another.

                Comment

                Working...
                X