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  • Questions about waivers

    I was in the reg army over 9 years ago now . I for re3 jfw due to depression due to my father dying right before I left for basic and my mother trying to **** her self over and over. On top of that I found my then new wife whom I'm still mairred to.

    14 weeks passing in 11b.

    So now 9 years later I want the join the NG I have the re3 jfw and minor issues from my past 11 years.
    A. Pi/mip 11 years ago
    B. Dwi 8 years ago
    C. Theft less than 500 6 years ago
    And not even a speeding ticket since
    All minor issues all resolved no more than misdemeanors.


    The recruiter had me write a letter to the general of our state colorado explaining how and why everything happened and said 7 day review process. Is it possible I will get in?
    Any info will be great thanks!

  • #2
    Re: Questions about waivers

    If I had to pick one recurring theme on this forum that chaps my hide more than anything else, it's folks who refer to DWI/DUI as "minor issues."

    Give it some thought. A DWI/DUI is someone that decides it's a rational decision to consume beverages that he knows will make him less safe behind the wheel, then operates a vehicle weighing several thousand pounds at high rates of speed on public roads.

    This is not a minor issue. This shows a serious lapse in judgment. You can make a pretty good argument that if you can't trust a soldier with a motor vehicle, you might want to think twice about trusting him with a weapon.

    Sounds like you've wisened up a bit since your stealing and drunk driving years ago, but I'd strongly suggest rethinking about these items as "minor issues" because folks writing the waivers likely won't. I say this in hopes that if you view these with a different light, you might be more likely to find yourself trusted and get what you want.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Questions about waivers

      Sorry about your experiences during your last time in service.

      You had misconduct and moral issues after you left the service so that will come into play if anything will get approved? Did you read this article? Link below.

      http://www.armytimes.com/news/2012/0...diers-010712w/

      I highlight this bit

      "
      The service cut 73,889 soldiers from fiscal 2005 through 2010 for poor performance and misconduct. In comparison, fewer than 1,200 were forced out as a result of reductions in force or budgetary constraints.
      “If you’re not performing satisfactorily, if you’re not doing your job or you’re a person that routinely gets in trouble, you’re not on the Army team,” Chandler said. “You’re not a professional soldier. We can give you a way to become a professional. We can do that through training and motivation. But if you’re just unwilling to do that, then you don’t get to be on the Army team.
      “Although some people may think that that’s harsh, it’s reality.”
      Protecting your career

      Professional character, commitment and competence will protect your career from forthcoming cuts, no matter how deep they go, Chandler said."

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Questions about waivers

        I am at Fort Carson so you close to me being from Colorado. Good luck.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Questions about waivers

          Originally posted by notyetdead View Post
          If I had to pick one recurring theme on this forum that chaps my hide more than anything else, it's folks who refer to DWI/DUI as "minor issues."

          Give it some thought. A DWI/DUI is someone that decides it's a rational decision to consume beverages that he knows will make him less safe behind the wheel, then operates a vehicle weighing several thousand pounds at high rates of speed on public roads.

          This is not a minor issue. This shows a serious lapse in judgment. You can make a pretty good argument that if you can't trust a soldier with a motor vehicle, you might want to think twice about trusting him with a weapon.

          Sounds like you've wisened up a bit since your stealing and drunk driving years ago, but I'd strongly suggest rethinking about these items as "minor issues" because folks writing the waivers likely won't. I say this in hopes that if you view these with a different light, you might be more likely to find yourself trusted and get what you want.
          I think it is a minor issue too. Thats probably because it is a minor issue.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Questions about waivers

            Originally posted by notyetdead View Post
            If I had to pick one recurring theme on this forum that chaps my hide more than anything else, it's folks who refer to DWI/DUI as "minor issues."

            Give it some thought. A DWI/DUI is someone that decides it's a rational decision to consume beverages that he knows will make him less safe behind the wheel, then operates a vehicle weighing several thousand pounds at high rates of speed on public roads.

            This is not a minor issue. This shows a serious lapse in judgment. You can make a pretty good argument that if you can't trust a soldier with a motor vehicle, you might want to think twice about trusting him with a weapon.

            Sounds like you've wisened up a bit since your stealing and drunk driving years ago, but I'd strongly suggest rethinking about these items as "minor issues" because folks writing the waivers likely won't. I say this in hopes that if you view these with a different light, you might be more likely to find yourself trusted and get what you want.
            I'll preface my comments by stating that I do not drink and drive nor do I support the activity, however your statement about DWI/DUI is false. I do not disagree that drinking and driving is a lapse in judgment that can have serious consequences however a DWI/DUI conviction does not necessarily indicate that the person is guilty of drinking and driving. Thousands of people each year are falsely convicted of DWI/DUI due to faulty forensics. The only reliable measure of BAC is with a blood test yet many people are convicted with a breath test. This test does not single out alcohol molecules but instead measures all substances in the methyl group. Once of those happens to be acetone, which is commonly found in high levels of dieters and diabetics. There have been test subjects who have blown a .12 after painting a room without consuming any alcoholic beverages. The test was later repeated with a mask and the subject still blew a .075. There are numerous other problems with breath tests yet the test is still accepted in every court in the country. This does not even count the people who were convicted of DWI/DUI simply because they decided to sleep off the drinks in their car in a parking lot after a bonfire just because the keys to the car were within their reach. How right is it that people are punished for trying to do the right thing?

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Questions about waivers

              Originally posted by bartonmw View Post
              I'll preface my comments by stating that I do not drink and drive nor do I support the activity, however your statement about DWI/DUI is false. I do not disagree that drinking and driving is a lapse in judgment that can have serious consequences however a DWI/DUI conviction does not necessarily indicate that the person is guilty of drinking and driving. Thousands of people each year are falsely convicted of DWI/DUI due to faulty forensics. The only reliable measure of BAC is with a blood test yet many people are convicted with a breath test. This test does not single out alcohol molecules but instead measures all substances in the methyl group. Once of those happens to be acetone, which is commonly found in high levels of dieters and diabetics. There have been test subjects who have blown a .12 after painting a room without consuming any alcoholic beverages. The test was later repeated with a mask and the subject still blew a .075. There are numerous other problems with breath tests yet the test is still accepted in every court in the country. This does not even count the people who were convicted of DWI/DUI simply because they decided to sleep off the drinks in their car in a parking lot after a bonfire just because the keys to the car were within their reach. How right is it that people are punished for trying to do the right thing?
              Debatable and some of it partially exaggerated. Then again this thread isn't about the legitimacy of law enforcement and their tools.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Questions about waivers

                Army Regulation 601–210

                http://www.apd.army.mil/pdffiles/r601_210.pdf

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Questions about waivers

                  Please understand the purpose for this site is to learn more about the National Guard. Not to debate law enforcement practices or other political issues. Waivers are granted on a case to case basis. The National Guard has a set of enlistment standards that each state will then further narrow based on their individual needs. The only true way to find out is to work with a recruiter and apply for one.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Questions about waivers

                    Originally posted by Firefly View Post
                    Please understand the purpose for this site is to learn more about the National Guard. Not to debate law enforcement practices or other political issues. Waivers are granted on a case to case basis. The National Guard has a set of enlistment standards that each state will then further narrow based on their individual needs. The only true way to find out is to work with a recruiter and apply for one.
                    Sorry, I thought the topic was notyetdeads chapped hide

                    Comment

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