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  • Special Forces Training Timeline

    No prior military experience (NPS):

    Non-prior service Special Forces candidate contract (REP 63*) guarantees the opportunity to "try out" for Special Forces. It does not guarantee that the recruit will be accepted into Special Forces. It only guarantees that the recruit will be given the opportunity to see if he has what it takes to become a member of one of the most highly-skilled, combat ready forces in the world.

    *The REP 63/18X contract only applies to states with Special Forces units is very selective and availability varies.

    Training

    Special Forces Candidates will usually attend Infantry (11X) One Station Unit Training (OSUT), which combines Army Basic Combat Training (BCT) and Infantry Advanced Individual Training (AIT), in one 15 week course at Fort Benning, GA. Upon graduation, Special Forces Candidates will attend 3-week Basic Airborne Training also at Fort Benning, GA. After "jump school," candidates are moved to Fort Bragg, NC to attend a 3-week Special Forces Preparation and Conditioning course (SFPC), which consists of Physical Conditioning; Map Reading and Land Navigation Instruction; Land Navigation Practical Exercises and Common Tasks Training. Then the 3-week Special Forces Assessment and Selection (SFAS) program. The SFAS program assesses and selects Soldiers for attendance to the Special Forces Qualification Course (SFQC).

    SFAS course uses a “Whole Man” selection process that assesses each candidate for many attributes that are important for all Special Forces Soldiers. These attributes are intelligence, trainability, physical fitness, motivation, influence, and judgment. If the recruit passes SFAS, he moves onto the SFQC. The SFQC teaches and develops the skills necessary for effective utilization of the SF Soldier.

    There are four entry-level enlisted Special Forces Career Management Field/MOS (CMF 18). The decision of which SF MOS and foreign language you will be trained in is based upon your personal background, aptitude scores (AFQT & DLAB) and personal desire. But, ultimately it will be up to the needs of the Special Forces Unit.

    18B Special Forces Weapons Sergeant

    Special Forces Weapons Sergeants have a working knowledge with weapons systems found throughout the world. They gain extensive knowledge about various types of U.S. and foreign small arms, sub-machine guns, machine guns, grenade launchers, forward-observer procedures and directs fires and indirect-fire weapons (mortars), anti-tank missiles.
    They learn the capabilities and characteristics of U.S. and foreign air defense and anti-tank weapons systems, tactical training and range fire as well as how to teach marksmanship and the employment of weapons to others. Weapons sergeants employ conventional and unconventional tactics and techniques as tactical mission leaders. They can recruit, organize, train and advise or command indigenous combat forces up to company size.

    18C Special Forces Engineer Sergeant

    The Special Forces Engineer Sergeant are experts in employing offensive/ defensive combat engineer capabilities to include demolitions, U.S. and foreign landmines, explosives and improvised munitions, construction, home made explosives, reconnaissance, and target analysis.
    The construction module requires Soldiers to learn to read blueprints as well as design, and to construct a theater-of-operations building, as well as field fortifications to be used as fire bases while deployed on an SFODA.
    Special Forces engineers are taught basic to advanced demolition skills that will enable them to destroy targets in non-electric and electric firing systems, with U.S., foreign and civilian demolition components. Engineer sergeants plan, supervise, lead, perform and instruct all aspects of combat engineering, demolition operations and theater of operations construction engineering in either English or their target language. They can recruit, organize, train and advise or command indigenous combat forces up to company size.

    18D Special Forces Medical Sergeant

    Special Forces Medical Sergeants are the finest first-response and trauma medical technicians in the world. They specialize in trauma management, infectious diseases, cardiac life support and surgical procedures, with a basic understanding of veterinary and dental medicine. Both general health care and emergency health care are stressed in training.
    Medical sergeants provide emergency, routine and long-term medical care for detachment members and associated allied members and host-nation personnel. They establish field medical facilities to support unconventional-warfare operations. They provide veterinary care. They prepare the medical portion of area studies, brief backs and operation plans and orders. Soldiers selected for MOS 18D attend 250 days of advanced medical training. Additionally, they spend two months of the year on a trauma rotation in hospital emergency rooms. The medical-training phase includes a nationally accredited emergency medical technician paramedic program. They can recruit, organize, train and advise or command indigenous combat forces up to company size.

    18E Special Forces Communications Sergeant

    Special Forces Communications Sergeants have to learn U.S. communication systems as well as those systems found throughout the world. He must incorporate this information and technology into his communications planning, and teach it to the other members of his ODA. Communications sergeants have a thorough grounding in communication basics, communications procedures, computer technology; assembly and systems applications. They must understand communication theory — how to install, operate and maintain FM, AM, HF, VHF and UHF radio systems They must be able to make communications in voice to data, and to read voice and data radio nets by utilizing computer systems and networks.
    Communications sergeants are experts in sending and receiving critical messages that link the SFODA with its command and control elements. They are familiar with antenna theory, radio wave propagation and how to teach it to others. Communications sergeants prepare the communications portion of area studies, brief backs and operation plans and orders. They can recruit, organize, train and advise or command indigenous combat forces up to company size.

    The entire training time-line is 22-32 continuous months depending upon SF Military Occupational Specialty (MOS).


    Current/Prior Service Enlisted:

    Training and Time-line

    1. Basic Combat Training (BCT) - 10 weeks, if not prior service Army, Marines, Navy SPECOPS or Air Force SPECOPS/Security Force.
    2. Advanced Individual Training (AIT), if not Army MOS qualified (For Prior-Service)
    3. Special Forces Readiness Evaluation/Assessment Drill (SFRE/SFAD); NG SF unit “try-out”
    4. Special Forces Assessment and Selection (SFAS) – 3 weeks, Ft. Bragg, NC
    5. Airborne School (if not Airborne Qualified) – 3 weeks, Ft. Benning, GA
    6. Warrior Leader Course/Common Leadership Training (WLC/CLT) [NCOES E4 & E5] – 3 weeks, Ft. Bragg, NC
    7. Special Forces Qualification Course (SFQC) - 62 to 98 weeks, Ft. Bragg, NC

    The entire training time-line is 18-27 months depending upon attendance to Airborne school, WLC and SF MOS.


    Current/Prior Service Officer

    Training and Time-line

    1. Special Forces Readiness Evaluation/Assessment Drill (SFRE/SFAD); NG SF unit “try-out”
    2. Special Forces Assessment and Selection (SFAS) – 3 weeks, Ft. Bragg, NC
    3. Airborne School (if not Airborne Qualified) – 3 weeks, Ft. Benning, GA
    4. Resident Maneuver Captains Career Course (MCCC), 24 weeks at Ft. Benning, GA
    5. Special Forces Qualification Course (SFQC) - 62 weeks, Ft. Bragg, NC

    The entire training time-line takes 20-24 months, depending upon attendance to Airborne school and MCCC.
    Last edited by SF Hunter; October 22nd, 2014, 01:55 PM.
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