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MD received, No Residency, what can I do for ARNG

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  • MD received, No Residency, what can I do for ARNG

    First and foremost I would like to extend gratitude for anyone and everyone (especially healthcare professionals) and military personnel alike that will give their time to helping me answering the questions I poise. I would also like to apologize if this topic ends up in the wrong First and foremost I would like to extend my gratitude for anyone and everyone (to military healthcare professionals) and other military personnel alike that will give their time to helping me answering the questions I poise. I would also like to apologize if this topic ends up in the wrong place.
    I am a recently graduated Medical Doctor from a US-accredited Foreign Medical School. I am a US Citizen, I am ECFMG Certified, I have passed all my United States Medical Licensing Exams (USMLE):

    USMLE Step 1,
    USMLE Step 2 Clinical Skills (CS)
    USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK)
    USMLE Step 3

    At this point in time I am trying to obtain Medical Post-graduate Status (PGY-1) status which is synonymous with Medical internship. I am extremely interested in finding a medical residency however have been unsuccessful this year, and previous where Iíve had to dish out $ 10000 over the last 2 years in applications alone.

    The Medical Specialty I am interested in is Family Medicine/ or Internal Medicine, but I also have a soft spot for Psychiatry as well.

    I know the ARNG offers help to Medical Students, and Medical Residents (those with PGY-1 and above statuses in an Accreditation Council of Medical Graduate Education (ACGME) post-MD graduate training program), however I fall in the gap between these two positions and was wondering how I can benefit the ARNG with my knowledge and expertise (meaning what employment opportunities does the ARNG offer in my position, is there a list? Or would I just be going to drills if I did decided to join ARNG go through Direct commission into O-3 (Captain) and work for ARNG (just not sure doing exactly what) for a year before I can re-apply to residency.

    To put it simply Iím asking:
    1) Since I am a Medical Doctor not in an ACGME accredited program (no PGY-1 status) meaning no Residency yet, what kind of work can I do for ARNG with my expertise and education and what will it entail? (Am I doing drills on a base? Will I be deployed?)

    2) Will I have to go for deployment in terms of my status (I know medical students and residents donít go on deployment)

    3)What counts as deployment (I live in New York, so if chosen will I be deployed domestically Ė within New York, within the USA or beyond if I join, and what are the chances (high chance, low chance?) I will be deployed overseas? Because as far as speaking to an ARNG recruiter in NY Iíve heard deployments can be 6 months when its working in Kuwait and such). I ask this question because of my family responsibilities (I travel frequently between 2 states to take care of my terminally ill father Ė my family is my life and supersedes everything).

    4) If Iím on a base doing weekend drills or whatever is needed of me is that considered Active Duty? Or is active duty when I get deployed?

    5)If I do ARNG for a little bit (6 months Ė 1 year), will I have better chances of getting into a Military Medical ACGME Accredited Residency Program? (Can I get into Military Medical Programs WITHOUT being in Military (ie. ARNG) prior to applying?)

    I am looking for clarification to these questions and welcome all the help people are willing to volunteer.






  • #2
    The Army medical system differs significantly from the rest of the Army. Please address this with your State's AMEDD recruiter (your local Guard recruiter can put you in touch).

    As generalized guidance, the Army won't accept a doctor as an Army doctor if he has no residency. Technically, you could serve in a different capacity, although as a practical matter that might present conflicts of time and availability for pursuing residency.

    Comment


    • #3
      Alright Thank you Matthew.ritchie, any idea what different capacities I might be suitable for with my status (despite time conflicts/ residency pursuit) or is that a question an AMEDD recruiter is better off answering?

      Comment


      • #4
        Hey, Phil. I'm an MD in the ARNG. Let me answer a few of these for you.
        Originally posted by PhilUMD View Post
        1) Since I am a Medical Doctor not in an ACGME accredited program (no PGY-1 status) meaning no Residency yet, what kind of work can I do for ARNG with my expertise and education and what will it entail? (Am I doing drills on a base? Will I be deployed?)
        In the Army, there are three statuses for physicians: medical students, residents, and board certified/eligible physicians.

        You need to be one of these three. You are welcome to look at joining the National Guard once you have joined residency. Right now, you are of no value to the Army, because you have no qualifications. You can not function in the Army in any medical capacity until you have your medical license, which you will not have until completing your first year of residency. After getting an MD, you are essentially in limbo until you get your civilian medical license, which then must be recognized by the National Guard before you can touch/talk to a soldier in any kind of medical capacity.

        You might find a state that takes you on, but I can't imagine why. I think most will ask you to apply once you've been accepted to residency. Until then, you're dead weight.
        Originally posted by PhilUMD View Post
        2) Will I have to go for deployment in terms of my status (I know medical students and residents don’t go on deployment)
        Not applicable. Once you join after securing a residency slot, you will be non-deployable until after you finish residency.
        Originally posted by PhilUMD View Post
        3)What counts as deployment (I live in New York, so if chosen will I be deployed domestically – within New York, within the USA or beyond if I join, and what are the chances (high chance, low chance?) I will be deployed overseas? Because as far as speaking to an ARNG recruiter in NY I’ve heard deployments can be 6 months when its working in Kuwait and such). I ask this question because of my family responsibilities (I travel frequently between 2 states to take care of my terminally ill father – my family is my life and supersedes everything).
        I'm sorry to hear about your father. You are protected from overseas deployments while in residency, but this does not include domestic deployments, which is not limited to your particular state. That said, these deployments tend to be much shorter and more rare (think Katrina).

        As a physician, once you deploy, your deployment is limited to 90 days overseas or 120 days total (when you count activities preparing for and from deployment).
        Originally posted by PhilUMD View Post
        4) If I’m on a base doing weekend drills or whatever is needed of me is that considered Active Duty? Or is active duty when I get deployed?
        You are active duty only if you are activated (e.g.: deployed). I am under the impression you are asking about benefits? You will not be eligible for active duty benefits unless you are activated for federal duty. Drill does not count.
        Originally posted by PhilUMD View Post
        5)If I do ARNG for a little bit (6 months – 1 year), will I have better chances of getting into a Military Medical ACGME Accredited Residency Program? (Can I get into Military Medical Programs WITHOUT being in Military (ie. ARNG) prior to applying?)
        Hope this helps. You need to secure a residency slot, then look to join.

        Comment


        • PhilUMD
          PhilUMD commented
          Editing a comment
          Notyetdead, I want to thank you immensely for this as you've answered what recruiters couldn't answer yet, it seems like the burden falls on me at this point. Once more I am very grateful to you for your proficient and comprehensive response.

          All the best, and the best of health to you, your family, and loved ones.
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