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  • Fort Sam Traning

    Hello All,
    I recently been selected to become an Army Officer and going to Fort Sam Houston for the AMEDD Basic Course (OBC) - does anyone know what does the training is all about?

    thanks,
    -Bonilla
    Last edited by dilawari; January 4th, 2013, 09:20 PM.

  • #2
    Re: Fort Sam Traning

    I've not been through the training myself, so all I can offer is some basic information. Here's what the National Guard website says about AMEDD. Hopefully, someone else will chime in and give you some personal anecdotes on the process.

    Either way, good luck! Hope your training goes well.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Fort Sam Traning

      Bonilla:
      Originally posted by dilawari View Post
      I recently been selected to become an Army Officer and going to Fort Sam Houston for the AMEDD Basic Course (OBC) - does anyone know what does the training is all about?
      Congratulations... Which BOLC you go to will depend on your MOS. If you are a 67J or 70-Series AOC, you will be going to the Long course. Any other designation and you will be going to the Short Course. The Long course is 44 days, the Short course is 27 days. I went to the Short course, but from folks that went to the long course (the short course piggybacked the end of their training), their first few weeks that we missed was heavy on powerpoint lessons and the like, not field work. For the short course, you spend roughly half of that in the "field" in Camp Bullis, and the other half back at Fort Sam.

      Fort Sam is powerpoint-heavy lectures and some other activities; you are housed in dorm/hotel-like acccomodations, usually splitting a room with someone, sharing the bathroom with them, each of you with your own locker, closet and desk. There are a few off days when you venture into Riverwalk at night and see the town. A group usually heads into The Cove to do laundry while they eat and drink. Good fun. The other half at Camp Bullis is doing field exercises and basic soldiering training (firearms, PT, map and nav, triage, etc.). You are housed in a long perma-tent with decent AC (we didn't need heat). I went in 2011 and there were no showers, but they were building them at the time so they're likely ready now (if they let you use them). The PT is underwhelming and if you're in halfway decent shape, you will do fine. You have the options to do Combatives if you have a passing APFT (or even if you can convince them you'll be able to pass Combatives by end of BOLC) in lieu of PT. I can't comment because I'd heard stories of a lot of MSK injuries and I was due for a surgery rotation after BOLC so I opted for the run, pushups, jumping jacks stuff that PT is mostly composed of. The Camp Bullis training varies from mildly uncomfortable to a lot of fun, depending on your tolerance and open-mindedness. About half of the training is pretty rudimentary for folks with decent outdoor skills, but I can't imagine anyone not picking up some new tricks. If you're in halfway decent shape, PT will be fine.

      One piece of advice: take BOLC somewhat seriously. You'll be given CDs for 83 hours of pre-BOLC training. Actually watch them and try to learn (stockpole books makes the Army Officer Guide which is also a handy reference for the basics). AMEDD Officers get the reputation as not being the sharpest of soldiers, which is fairly deserved. If you're a provider, the Army would rather you spend the bulk of your time learning how to use a scalpel with precision rather than triangulate yourself on a flat field within 4 inches. That said, do not blow this stuff off entirely. If nothing else, learn how to put your uniform together properly, learn a decent salute (and how and when to execute one) and take the time to learn what rank each insignia represents so when you find yourself getting saluted all around Fort Sam (probably a new experience for you), instead of addressing them with a lame, "Good morning... soldier..." you can actually address them by rank. They've earned it.

      I haven't seen too many AMEDD BOLC questions, so feel free to post them here if you have other questions and I can try to answer them. Congratulations and welcome to the AMEDD community.
      Last edited by notyetdead; January 8th, 2013, 05:33 PM.

      Comment


      • theboyismine0
        theboyismine0 commented
        Editing a comment
        That was really helpful "notyetdead". My 72D board starts in a couple days (Oct 29th). So if everything goes well, I will be needing to take the pre-BOLC training too. I'm trying to see if I can start some of the reading in advance. Do you know a good place to buy the CD? Or if you or anyone is able to loan me theirs till I get mine, hopefully not longer than a month.
        Thanks

    • #4
      Re: Fort Sam Traning

      Originally posted by notyetdead View Post
      Bonilla:

      Congratulations... Which BOLC you go to will depend on your MOS. If you are a 67J or 70-Series AOC, you will be going to the Long course. Any other designation and you will be going to the Short Course. The Long course is 44 days, the Short course is 27 days. I went to the Short course, but from folks that went to the long course (the short course piggybacked the end of their training), their first few weeks that we missed was heavy on powerpoint lessons and the like, not field work. For the short course, you spend roughly half of that in the "field" in Camp Bullis, and the other half back at Fort Sam.

      Fort Sam is powerpoint-heavy lectures and some other activities; you are housed in dorm/hotel-like acccomodations, usually splitting a room with someone, sharing the bathroom with them, each of you with your own locker, closet and desk. There are a few off days when you venture into Riverwalk at night and see the town. A group usually heads into The Cove to do laundry while they eat and drink. Good fun. The other half at Camp Bullis is doing field exercises and basic soldiering training (firearms, PT, map and nav, triage, etc.). You are housed in a long perma-tent with decent AC (we didn't need heat). I went in 2011 and there were no showers, but they were building them at the time so they're likely ready now (if they let you use them). The PT is underwhelming and if you're in halfway decent shape, you will do fine. You have the options to do Combatives if you have a passing APFT (or even if you can convince them you'll be able to pass Combatives by end of BOLC) in lieu of PT. I can't comment because I'd heard stories of a lot of MSK injuries and I was due for a surgery rotation after BOLC so I opted for the run, pushups, jumping jacks stuff that PT is mostly composed of. The Camp Bullis training varies from mildly uncomfortable to a lot of fun, depending on your tolerance and open-mindedness. About half of the training is pretty rudimentary for folks with decent outdoor skills, but I can't imagine anyone not picking up some new tricks. If you're in halfway decent shape, PT will be fine.

      One piece of advice: take BOLC somewhat seriously. You'll be given CDs for 83 hours of pre-BOLC training. Actually watch them and try to learn (stockpole books makes the Army Officer Guide which is also a handy reference for the basics). AMEDD Officers get the reputation as not being the sharpest of soldiers, which is fairly deserved. If you're a provider, the Army would rather you spend the bulk of your time learning how to use a scalpel with precision rather than triangulate yourself on a flat field within 4 inches. That said, do not blow this stuff off entirely. If nothing else, learn how to put your uniform together properly, learn a decent salute (and how and when to execute one) and take the time to learn what rank each insignia represents so when you find yourself getting saluted all around Fort Sam (probably a new experience for you), instead of addressing them with a lame, "Good morning... soldier..." you can actually address them by rank. They've earned it.

      I haven't seen too many AMEDD BOLC questions, so feel free to post them here if you have other questions and I can try to answer them. Congratulations and welcome to the AMEDD community.


      Thanks so much very informative....

      Comment


      • #5
        Re: Fort Sam Traning

        Thanks so much -- very informative!

        Comment

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