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Issues after running.

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  • #16
    Re: Issues after running.

    Thomason, you're still a freakish machine. I wouldn't run, but like I mentioned do NOT stop your cardio. Do the eliptical or jumping jacks or whatever you need to to keep a high degree of cardiovascular fitness. Now stop reading the dumb forums and go work out!

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    • #17
      Re: Issues after running.

      Take a moment to notice how you run ... Do your legs kick out and extend all the way out in front so that you land on your heel first? Or do you knees come up and you land on the mid-section of your foot? Heel-striking can cause a lot of unwanted pain since it creates friction (you're trying to move forward while your heel comes out as if to stop you). Think about jumping off of a chair. When you land, you land on the balls of you feet, your knees soften to absorb the fall, and you gently let your heels touch the floor. You wouldn't jump off of a chair and try to land on your heels, right? I get a shock up my spine just thinking about it!
      Google "mid-foot stride" or "mid-foot running" and try to watch some video ... This will help explain what I mean.
      I know it sounds silly, but lots of people need to train themselves how to run and it does take some practice!
      Good luck!

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      • #18
        Re: Issues after running.

        Originally posted by selmore816 View Post
        Take a moment to notice how you run ... Do your legs kick out and extend all the way out in front so that you land on your heel first? Or do you knees come up and you land on the mid-section of your foot? Heel-striking can cause a lot of unwanted pain since it creates friction (you're trying to move forward while your heel comes out as if to stop you). Think about jumping off of a chair. When you land, you land on the balls of you feet, your knees soften to absorb the fall, and you gently let your heels touch the floor. You wouldn't jump off of a chair and try to land on your heels, right? I get a shock up my spine just thinking about it!
        Google "mid-foot stride" or "mid-foot running" and try to watch some video ... This will help explain what I mean.
        I know it sounds silly, but lots of people need to train themselves how to run and it does take some practice!
        Good luck!
        I've seen some videos of what you are talking about and I do land on my heel, would I just have to force myself to land mid-foot, or land on the front part of my feet to avoid the pain?

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        • #19
          Re: Issues after running.

          With a minimalist shoe you would automatically land on your mid/fore foot.

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          • #20
            Re: Issues after running.

            Originally posted by StandFast85 View Post
            With a minimalist shoe you would automatically land on your mid/fore foot.
            I've also heard of those shoes, would I be allowed to use those shoes at RSP and take them with me to BCT if I explain the issue to who ever may be in charge?

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            • #21
              Re: Issues after running.

              Depends on your cadre. Merrel has a line, "Barefoot", that looks halfway normal. The other end of the spectrum would be the Vibram FiveFingers.

              Research before taking on minimalist running. It takes awhile to get used to.

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              • #22
                Re: Issues after running.

                Im new to this board and am not a physical therapist in any way but I am a triathlete and a crossfitter, and because of Pararescue, I run... a lot lol.

                One thing you really need to look at is how you are landing. If you are used to mechanics this is a good way to think of it. Imagine a worn out ball joint (your ankle is actually a hinge joint, but I find this to be easier to understand), it is still stiff but can be moved by your hands with a bit of "umph". Now picture the ball joint is your foot. It cant be moved in different directions by hand, it takes a bit of "umph" to get it to move in some directions and a bit of stretching to achieve the distance. When you are running, every time you land, there is that "umph". Generally the foot is going to pivot forward and slightly outward, this is most people, this happens when you land on the inside and ball of the mid/forefoot. It is called Pronating. Depending on the the amount you run, even minimalist running, if you pronate VERY heavily, it will still cause shin splints, but if your pronated land is not very extreme you wont have much complications, it is really an ideal land. Now you also have the opposite of this, which is supinating. This is what I do. When you supinate you land on the outside of your foot, I have shoes to help me correct this but when I do timed runs I use my full minimalist Saucony Kinvera 2's. The problem with this running type is that you land on the outside and ROLL to the inside. As you do this motion to rotate your "ball joint" (hinge joint to be literal but whatever haha) you are applying some heavy strain on it, this strain is taken by the outside of your leg (around the shin). This is usually an OVER stretch of the Fibularis Brevis. If this is the pain you are having than I suggest you do a lot of light stretching at night before bed. Here are few good stretches..

                To really stretch the back your entire leg try this...
                stand up straight, and place your foot of the desired leg to be stretch in front you, about a foot and a half in front of the other, place your arms on a wall in front of you and lean forward. Be sure to keep the knee locked and the leg straight as you lean forward. Continue to lean forward, pivoting at the hips only, keep your lower back straight. Now begin to raise your toes in the air, so only the heel is on the floor. You want to reach a point where you butt is pushed out, your lower lumbar remains in neutral straight position, your leg is straight, your toes are pointed and you are at a 130 degree angle from your hips, while laying your arms on the wall for support.

                Also a god one for the outside shin, and all that tough tissue in your hips, is to just sit like how all are fathers sat in a chair, one leg on the floor, bring the other foot up and place it on your thigh. Grab the outside of the foot with your hand and pull up, than push down right below your knee (same leg) with your other hand. This will help stretching.

                One more thing, if you run a lot, you put a heavy load on your body. Try icing and heating after your runs along with stretching, and the cure all for me is compression. Get a pair of good high quality compression socks and wear them when you go to sleep. You will be amazed at how well these work!!

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                • #23
                  Re: Issues after running.

                  From my understanding, minimalist and barefoot type shoes are not allowed at BCT or other trainings, like OCS.
                  And from my own experience, I wouldn't advise that someone brand new to running just slip on a pair and go for a jog. They are a great shoe to help with stride and strengthening ankles/shins/calves - but many newbies think they are the magic pill to running. Running effectively takes time and practice with concentrated focus on form. I use my Vibrams once a week on soft trail to help with my sprints and strength. All of my road running is done in my time-tested Asics.

                  Think about running in place. When you jog in place, you naturally land on your toes and gently let you heel touch the floor. Your knees comes up slightly to allow for is movement. Now try jogging in place, then lean forward slightly. This momentum should propel you forward and focus on keeping your strides short and your feet underneath your hips. People are disillusioned to think that long strides equate to running faster, but really the secret is keeping your knees up, feet in line under your hips, and shorter strides.

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                  • #24
                    Re: Issues after running.

                    Keep in mind that when you run, you are putting a lot of pressure on your muscles AND bones. The key is to condition your body so running is enjoyable and you can avoid injury.

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                    • #25
                      Re: Issues after running.

                      Originally posted by raania View Post
                      Keep in mind that when you run, you are putting a lot of pressure on your muscles AND bones. The key is to condition your body so running is enjoyable and you can avoid injury.
                      Which why when a person runs they should be running on soft uneven grass/dirt surfaces and avoid concrete and asphalt because our bodies weren't designed to run on them.

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                      • #26
                        Re: Issues after running.

                        Originally posted by o13starsnstripes View Post
                        Which why when a person runs they should be running on soft uneven grass/dirt surfaces and avoid concrete and asphalt because our bodies weren't designed to run on them.
                        Too bad this isn't common practice. Now-a-days, everything has to be poured concrete to be considered a 'running path'...The first thing I think of when I read this post is "Hey, my vet said that when I run with my dog, I should find paths that allow him to run on grass or dirt because the concrete is bad for his joints." So.....what makes our joints any different?

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                        • #27
                          Re: Issues after running.

                          Originally posted by Hawks View Post
                          Too bad this isn't common practice. Now-a-days, everything has to be poured concrete to be considered a 'running path'...The first thing I think of when I read this post is "Hey, my vet said that when I run with my dog, I should find paths that allow him to run on grass or dirt because the concrete is bad for his joints." So.....what makes our joints any different?
                          People just don't care unless it is happening today. If it is 20 years down the road they don't care.

                          An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

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                          • #28
                            Re: Issues after running.

                            Always livin' in 'the now'

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                            • #29
                              Re: Issues after running.

                              Originally posted by Hawks View Post
                              Always livin' in 'the now'
                              Now and forever then

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