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  • #16
    Re: Running.

    Shin splints are usually caused by improper footwear which is exacerbated by being overweight. Buying expensive running shoes doesn't help if you're buying the wrong ones. Google "buying proper running shoes" and do some research. Your feet, gait, etc. all factor in. With a little reading you'll soon know if you need stability, motion-controlled or neutral, firm or soft soles, etc.

    Originally posted by nymike1
    Also, do not stretch before your run. Warm up, take a hot shower, massage your shins. Stretch afterwords but never before. Make sure you are warmed up - which might mean brisk walk before the run.
    I couldn't disagree more with this. You need to warm up and stretch before running. Showers and massages won't do anything for you. After weight and footwear, shin splints occur due to tightness in the arch of your foot and calves. Before you head out, take a can of shaving cream and roll each foot over it on the ground. Then warm up and stretch, focusing on your calves.

    Getting the right shoes, losing some weight and properly stretching should minimize the occurrence of shin splints.

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    • #17
      Re: Running.

      Shin splints are the result of small tears accumulating in the anterior musculature of the lower leg. Here we are primarily concerned with the anterior tibialis. You are likely a heel striker which is compunded by being overweight. Stretching and new shoes won't help. You need to strengthen the muscle. When you strike your foot wants to slap to the ground, and the ant. tib. slows it down. If it is weak it gets little tears which you experience as shin splints. I prefer to run backwards after my runs to cure them. When running backwards be sure to roll off your heel while lifting your toes. You will feel it in your shin if you are doing it right.

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      • #18
        Re: Running.

        From medicine.net

        What causes shin splints?

        A primary culprit causing shin splints is a sudden increase in distance or intensity of a workout schedule. This increase in muscle work can be associated with inflammation of the lower leg muscles, those muscles used in lifting the foot (the motion during which the foot pivots toward the tibia). Such a situation can be aggravated by a tendency to pronate the foot (roll it excessively inward onto the arch).

        Similarly, a tight Achilles tendon or weak ankle muscles are also often implicated in the development of shin splints.

        How were shin splints treated?

        Previously, two different treatment management strategies were used: total rest or a "run through it" approach. The total rest was often an unacceptable option to the athlete. The run through it approach was even worse. It often led to worsening of the injury and of the symptoms.

        Currently, a multifaceted approach of "relative rest" is successfully utilized to restore the athlete to a pain-free level of competition.


        What is the multifaceted "relative rest" approach?

        This multifaceted approach includes:

        •Workouts such as stationary bicycling or pool running: These will allow maintenance of cardiovascular fitness.
        •Icing reduces inflammation.
        •Anti-inflammatory medications, such as ibuprofen (Advil/Motrin); naproxen (Aleve/Naprosyn), are also a central part of rehabilitation.
        •A 4-inch wide Ace bandage wrapped around the region also helps reduce discomfort.
        •Calf and anterior (front of) leg stretching and strengthening addresses the biomechanical problems discussed above and reduce pain.
        •Pay careful attention to selecting the correct running shoe based upon the foot type (flexible pronator vs. rigid supinator). This is extremely important. In selected cases, shoe inserts (orthotics) may be necessary.
        •Stretching and strengthening exercises are done twice a day.
        •Run only when symptoms have generally resolved (often about two weeks) and with several restrictions:
        1.A level and soft terrain is best.
        2.Distance is limited to 50% of that tolerated preinjury.
        3.Intensity (pace) is similarly cut by one half.
        4.Over a three-six week period, a gradual increase in distance is allowed.
        5.Only then can a gradual increase in pace be attempted.
        Caveat!

        The amount of injury that occurs prior to any rehabilitation program plays a significant role in determining the time frame necessary for complete recovery.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Running.

          Originally posted by chd
          Shin splints are usually caused by improper footwear which is exacerbated by being overweight. Buying expensive running shoes doesn't help if you're buying the wrong ones. Google "buying proper running shoes" and do some research. Your feet, gait, etc. all factor in. With a little reading you'll soon know if you need stability, motion-controlled or neutral, firm or soft soles, etc.



          I couldn't disagree more with this. You need to warm up and stretch before running. Showers and massages won't do anything for you. After weight and footwear, shin splints occur due to tightness in the arch of your foot and calves. Before you head out, take a can of shaving cream and roll each foot over it on the ground. Then warm up and stretch, focusing on your calves.

          Getting the right shoes, losing some weight and properly stretching should minimize the occurrence of shin splints.
          You might disagree - but this is what most sport scientists are recommending these days. Pick up any running, fitness health magazine these days and this is what is recommended. Now dynamic stretches are recommended, but I think it's a bit perhaps too advanced for a starting runner. Find the right type of shoes and get warmed up. And btw, a hot shower is probably the best warm up for any and all activities - bar none.

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          • #20
            Re: Running.

            Running shoes aren't the problem either. I went to a store called Runner's, where they measure you, watch you walk, etc so that you can get fitted to the best shoes possible for your type of foot. It definitely wasn't cheap by any means, but I knew I was getting the best possible shoes to run in.

            I'll try some other things too, but I appreciate all of your input.

            I won't give up, I'll keep at it....and eventually I will be better at running
            Last edited by ping9798; February 27th, 2010, 08:37 PM.

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            • #21
              Re: Running.

              Originally posted by ping9798
              Running shoes aren't the problem either. I went to a store called Runner's, where they measure you, watch you watch, etc so that you can get fitted to the best shoes possible for your type of foot. It definitely wasn't cheap by any means, but I knew I was getting the best possible shoes to run in.

              I'll try some other things too, but I appreciate all of your input.

              I won't give up, I'll keep at it....and eventually I will be better at running
              What exactly did they give you? Did they say that you over-pronate? Did you get a cushion shoe, a lightweight shoe, or a generic heavy shoe (like an air-max)?

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Running.

                Originally posted by nymike1
                What exactly did they give you? Did they say that you over-pronate? Did you get a cushion shoe, a lightweight shoe, or a generic heavy shoe (like an air-max)?
                I can't think of what they are off the top of my head and I'm at work so I can't check. All I know for sure is the brand is New Balance...they had me try a couple different brands and these fit the best. I'll try to remember to find what exactly they are and let you know. It's lightweight, I believe. They didn't tell me specifically anything about over-pronate or anything.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Running.

                  I just finished the book, "Ultra Marathon Man".

                  It's a great read, and very motivating.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Running.

                    Originally posted by QuantumRN
                    I just finished the book, "Ultra Marathon Man".

                    It's a great read, and very motivating.
                    Dean Karnazes is the man! Obviously, he's Greek.

                    Comment

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