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  • Freed

    A federal judge on Monday ordered the Pentagon to release a long-held Mauritanian captive at Guantanamo Bay who was once considered such a high-value detainee that former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld designated him for "special interrogation techniques."

    U.S. District Judge James Robertson's ruling was classified, so there was no immediate explanation for why he granted the habeas corpus petition of Mohamedou Slahi, 39. A notation in court files said an unclassified version of the ruling would be made available, but didn't say when.

    Slahi is the 34th Guantanamo detainee ordered freed since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled detainees could challenge their incarceration in federal court, but his name was already well known because of investigations into detainee abuse.

    Those probes found Slahi had been subjected to sleep deprivation, exposed to extremes of heat and cold, moved around the base blindfolded, and at one point taken into the bay on a boat and threatened with death. Investigators also found interrogators had told him they would arrest his mother and have her jailed as the only female detainee at Guantanamo if he did not cooperate.

    The interrogations were so abusive a highly regarded Pentagon lawyer, Marine Lt. Col. Stuart Couch, quit the case five years ago rather than prosecute him at the Bush administration's first effort to stage military commissions.

    "He's been incarcerated, tortured and interrogated and rendered illegally," said attorney Nancy Hollander of Albuquerque, N.M., who represents Slahi free of charge. "After almost 10 years, the government has not been able to meet the minimal burden to detain him that's required under habeas. He should be free."

    Justice Department spokesman Dean Boyd said lawyers were "reviewing the ruling." The government has appealed some of the habeas release orders.

    Slahi faces no criminal charges. He arrived at Guantanamo in August 2002, nearly a year after he turned himself in for questioning in his native Mauritania in late September 2001 and found himself handed over first to Jordan for interrogation and then to U.S. forces in Afghanistan.

    He filed his petition for habeas corpus himself in handwritten English on March 3, 2005, on a form provided by prison camp staff.

    It was Robertson's second Guantanamo habeas ruling. Earlier, he had upheld the detention of Yemeni Adham Awad, even though the government's case was "gossamer thin."

    Robertson, a former U.S. Navy officer, has had oversight of Guantanamo cases for years. In 2004, he ruled the Bush administration's first attempt to stage military commissions was unconstitutional in the case of Osama bin Laden's driver, Salim Hamdan. Hamdan's case led to a Supreme Court ruling that the Bush administration had exceeded its authority in setting up the commissions. Hamdan was later convicted of supporting a terrorist organization before a military commission. He was released after serving an additional five months and is now free in Yemen.

    Slahi had long been a person of interest to U.S. authorities investigating al-Qaida attacks and attempts in the United States, in part because he had lived as a student in both Germany and Canada in the 1990s.

    Pentagon records said the military suspected him of ties to the Hamburg, Germany, cell that had carried out the Sept. 11, 2001, hijackings, apparently because accused 9/11 plotter Ramzi bin al Shibh named him during secret CIA interrogations.

    U.S. officials also wondered whether he was linked to the failed al-Qaida Millennium Plot to blow up Los Angeles International Airport on Dec. 31, 1999.

    According to both Pentagon and Senate investigations, Rumsfeld gave permission for Slahi to be subjected to so-called "special interrogation plans" in August 2003, a year after Slahi had arrived at Guantanamo.

    Slahi accused military authorities of having tortured him when he was brought before a military panel assessing the evidence against him in December 2005. He called the evidence against him illogical.

    "It does not make any sense to me," he said, according to a Pentagon transcript. "It looks like O.J. trial."

    In November 2006, he wrote his lawyers that he had denied any wrongdoing while in custody until he was tortured. "I yess-ed every accusation my interrogators made," after they tortured him, he said. "I even wrote the infamous confession about me planning to hit the CN Tower in Toronto."

    He also made light of his attorneys' request to list the number of times he was interrogated since his capture. "That's like asking Charlie Sheen how many women he dated."

    As of Monday, he was unaware of the decision. His attorneys had asked to speak to him at the prison by telephone as soon as possible and asked the Pentagon to waive the 10-day advance notice for such a call.


    Copyright 2010 Miami Herald.

    Can you believe this? I hope our government get its act together. I betcha it will be another "former detainee" return to the motherland and commit Jihad on our troops again.

  • #2
    Re: Freed

    you might want to commit jihad too after suffering torture ie special interrogation techniques and imprisonment without trial for years.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Freed

      Originally posted by RandyB
      you might want to commit jihad too after suffering torture ie special interrogation techniques and imprisonment without trial for years.
      Nah I wouldn't mind it puts hair on your chest; Plus shouldn't I "have due process" since "I AM" a citizen of this GREAT COUNTRY and not a enemy combatant?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Freed

        Originally posted by RandyB
        you might want to commit jihad too after suffering torture ie special interrogation techniques and imprisonment without trial for years.
        Torture is what was done to the American POWS in the Vietnam war.......

        I would go into what they did to our soldiers but then the post would be locked or erased.

        That's toture. You have a screwed idea of what torture is.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Freed

          we called water boarding torture when the japanese did it to us in ww2, what's changed.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Freed

            Originally posted by RandyB
            we called water boarding torture when the japanese did it to us in ww2, what's changed.
            I bet Nick Berg or Daniel Pearl would have loved to been watered boarded compared to what they recieved! They weren't enemy combatants.....

            THEY WERE BEHEADED!....no he wasn't tortured.
            Last edited by 7011USMC; March 23rd, 2010, 03:42 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Freed

              we have no need to steep to our enemies level. If we want to have the moral upper hand we must be better than that and by and large we are.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Freed

                Water boarding is in fact used as a training method for SEER training to this day.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Freed

                  Originally posted by RandyB
                  we have no need to steep to our enemies level. If we want to have the moral upper hand we must be better than that and by and large we are.
                  LOL that is a myth....wait till you go downrange and serve in combat "war is h-e-l-l". I'm sure our enemy brethren would treat you and I with "kid gloves" wouldn't they?

                  MILITARY TRIBUNAL for enemy combatants or as I would prefer "an eye for an eye".

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Freed

                    different prespectives I guess, I don't know if I will ever be sent down range, a hospital in the states is more likely but could always see some field hospital time.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Freed

                      Originally posted by RandyB
                      we have no need to steep to our enemies level. If we want to have the moral upper hand we must be better than that and by and large we are.
                      True, but a slap on the wrist for conspiring to commit terrorism or human slaughter is unacceptable. You can also only look so good in front of the rest of the world...being America and all.

                      Note the underwear bomber and Fort Hood shooter. Blatant Islamic terror. One of them wasn't even a citizen and gets treated as such.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Freed

                        The judge had to have a reason, we will find out eventually what it was.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Freed

                          Originally posted by RandyB
                          The judge had to have a reason, we will find out eventually what it was.
                          Let me guess a parasite with socialist agenda that wants to legislate from the bench? Or a lost in the hippie generation with a postmodernism world view that holds that there is no truth, no basic right or wrong, nothing good or bad, nothing evil or noble, nothing moral or immoral.

                          I wish our forefathers could see us now!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Freed

                            Originally posted by RandyB
                            different prespectives I guess, I don't know if I will ever be sent down range, a hospital in the states is more likely but could always see some field hospital time.
                            I bet she didn't either. Read the story below....Army Spc. Monica Lin Brown (combat medic) won a silver star for valor while serving in ASTAN.

                            http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23547346/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Freed

                              As a side note, let's not forget that the military does not engage in treatment of it's captives and detainee's that would be in conflict with the Geneva Conventions.

                              Most of this 'torture' stuff is usually done by three letter agencies who, until recently, had their own set of rules that were considered LEGAL (I emphasize that this is considered 'legal', because Randy B seems confident in his Government do have the "right" reasons to do things like trial terrorists as U.S Citizens - yet it was the same government that LEGALLY allowed water boarding in the first place.) It was only recently that agencies like the CIA now have to follow the Army regulations for Interrogations.

                              I'm not taking sides on whether or not the waterboarding was ethical or not, but it was legal.

                              Comment

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