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Guard vs. Reserve

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  • Guard vs. Reserve

    Can someone tell me the difference besides one is Federal and one is State?

  • #2
    Re: Guard vs. Reserve

    No combat arms in the researves.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Guard vs. Reserve

      Do the Reserves have MPs, FA, and engineers?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Guard vs. Reserve

        Some of the bigger differences:

        The Guard is made up of 54 state/teritorial commands with the Gov. as the commander in chief durring state functions, this is why they are inlcuded in the oath. This is also why they can offer better ed benefits, but not all states do this. The Reserve is made up of 1 single command.

        The Guard is usually spread out over the state, where the Reserve is moving towards single facilities that house multiple units.

        State laws govern some aspects of the Guard, such as punishment, where as the Reserve is governed by the UCMJ.

        As posted before, the Reserve doesn't have any combat arms (few minor exceptions) but they have most if not all of the medical, psyops and civil affairs units. The Guard has a mix of combat, combat support and combat service support.

        The Reserve you can be mobilized to fill another unit from somewhere else in the country for deployment. The Guard, this will only happen in your state.

        The Reserve seems like they have a little more money for schools vs the Guard. But the Guard seems like they have more money for longer weekend drills.

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        • #5
          Re: Guard vs. Reserve

          Anyone know of any differences in enlistment bonuses or are those just for critical MOS's for both?

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          • #6
            Re: Guard vs. Reserve

            You can be mobilized with other states, but the governor (TAG) has to agree to it, and that normally doesn't happen unless there's some kind of quid pro quo working.

            There are plenty schools in the guard, but they tend to be focused on skills you actually need in your job rather than something to get you a badge.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Guard vs. Reserve

              Originally posted by RandyB
              No combat arms in the researves.
              Really?......

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Guard vs. Reserve

                Originally posted by KMANinTX
                Really?......
                Yes really, the only Combat Arms unit remaining is the 100th Battalion 442 Infantry Regiment.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Guard vs. Reserve

                  100th Battalion, 442nd Infantry is the last combat arms unit in the USAR and you do see combat arms MOS's/branches in the training divisions and serving on command staff. This fairly small compared to the NG.

                  In reference to mobilization, the NG does not involuntary mobilize a Soldier to fill a unit in another state. The USAR frequently involuntarily mobilizes Soldiers to fill units outside their geographic area and even MSC.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Guard vs. Reserve

                    Originally posted by RedLeg
                    100th Battalion, 442nd Infantry is the last combat arms unit in the USAR and you do see combat arms MOS's/branches in the training divisions and serving on command staff. This fairly small compared to the NG.

                    In reference to mobilization, the NG does not involuntary mobilize a Soldier to fill a unit in another state. The USAR frequently involuntarily mobilizes Soldiers to fill units outside their geographic area and even MSC.
                    WOW, where did you learn about the last remaining unit??

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Guard vs. Reserve

                      Originally posted by ParalegalNCO1
                      Yes really, the only Combat Arms unit remaining is the 100th Battalion 442 Infantry Regiment.
                      They also have two battalions of Apaches.


                      Cue inevitable flame war as to whether these count as combat units.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Guard vs. Reserve

                        Originally posted by ParalegalNCO1
                        WOW, where did you learn about the last remaining unit??
                        For 100 bonus points, who can tell us the significance of this unit?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Guard vs. Reserve

                          Originally posted by ParalegalNCO1
                          WOW, where did you learn about the last remaining unit??
                          Actually smart guy, I had hit the reply button and then looked up the exact unit before hitting submit reply.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Guard vs. Reserve

                            Originally posted by matthew.ritchie
                            For 100 bonus points, who can tell us the significance of this unit?
                            The 100th Battalion, 442nd Infantry, is the only remaining Infantry unit in the Army Reserve force structure. Its headquarters is located at Fort Shafter, Hawaii, and its units are located in Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam and Saipan. Under the command and control of the 9th Regional Support Command, the 100th/442nd's wartime mission is to be one of the maneuver battalion's of the 29th Separate Infantry Brigade, Hawaii Army National Guard.

                            It is important to recognize the contributions of the Japanese Americans who served in the U.S. Army's 100th Battalion and 442nd Combat Infantry group. History speaks for itself in documenting that none have shared their blood more valiantly for America than the Japanese Americans who served in these units while fighting enemy forces in Europe during World War II. The records of the 100th Battalion and 442nd Infantry are without equal.

                            Because young Japanese men of the second generation [nisei] were often eager to fight against the Axis Powers Japanese-American units were created in the Army. In order to eliminate the confusion that might arise in the Pacific, the nisei units were to be employed only in the Mediterranean and European theaters of operation. The 442nd Infantry Regiment was the largest nisei unit. Fighting in Italy and southern France, the unit was known for its bravery and determination, as reflected by the unit motto, "Go for broke!"

                            The first all-Japanese American Nisei military unit was the 100th Battalion, which was the designation for the unit which was formed from the Japanese Americans who comprised a large part of the Hawaiian National Guard. These Nisei were sent to Camp McCoy, Wisconsin for combat training and later were moved to Camp Shelby, Mississippi for additional training. They adopted the phrase "Remember Pearl Harbor" as their motto.

                            In 1943, the War Department in need of manpower reverse itself and sent recruiters to the relocation camps asking for volunteers to form a new Japanese American combat unit the 442nd Regimental Combat Team. Volunteers were also accepted from Hawaii where 12,500 men had volunteered. The Nisei volunteers were combined with Japanese Americans still in the military and were sent to Camp Shelby, Mississippi for combat training.


                            100 Bonus Points!!!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Guard vs. Reserve

                              Include your source at least. Geez.

                              http://www.globalsecurity.org/milita.../100-442in.htm

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