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  • Seizure Disorder & Deployment

    My husband was diagnosed with seizure disorder last week. He was supposed to deploy in a few months. He has emailed/called his 1SG but no response yet. Does anybody know if he will still be able to deploy? He is now on anti-seizure medication and cannot drive for three months. He is worried this will mean they will actually discharge him from the Guard now. Is that right or will he be able to stay in?

  • #2
    Re: Seizure Disorder & Deployment

    Per the AR 40-501
    Chapter 3 (Retention standards)

    330. Neurological disorders
    The causes for referral to an MEB are as follows:
    i. Seizure disorders and epilepsy. Seizures by themselves are not disqualifying unless they are manifestations of epilepsy. However, they may be considered along with other disabilities in judging fitness. In general, epilepsy is disqualifying unless the Soldier can be maintained free of clinical seizures of all types by nontoxic doses of medications.

    The reg goes on to describe the course of action for active duty soldiers which is not really applicable in this case.

    You husband will probably not deploy with this condition. Due to his non-deployability, he will need to bring in documentation of his diagnosis and prognosis to receive a profile. If he is unable to perform any of the soldier duties listed at the top of the profile sheet, he will be determined a category 3 in one or more of his PULHES. He would then be referred to a board (MMRB/MEB/PEB) to determine his ability to stay in the Guard.

    If he does in fact, have epilepsy (as described in the regulation above) he would be non-retainable, and a board would not be necessary. His state could choose to just do an administrative medical discharge.

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    • #3
      Re: Seizure Disorder & Deployment

      Not deploying for sure. That is a serious risk his superiors would not want to take.

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      • #4
        Re: Seizure Disorder & Deployment

        Thanks! If he doesn't push for it, is it likely he would be discharged against his will? Or would he really have to push for a discharge for it to happen?

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        • #5
          Re: Seizure Disorder & Deployment

          It's not his choice, nor will he have a say, if it's clear that he does not meet the Chapter 3 retention standard of the 40-501.

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          • #6
            Re: Seizure Disorder & Deployment

            I would focus on your husbands health and not his military career. My father died of a seizure, even with medication it can be a dangerous disorder. Best wishes to the both of you.

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            • #7
              Re: Seizure Disorder & Deployment

              Thanks again, Quantum! He is going to try to call his 1SG again today.

              Marine2Guard, he's stabilised now, on anti-seizure meds and then I have another medicine to give him if he does have another seizure. He is concerned that he is going to get into trouble for not going on this deployment (he got home from Afghanistan in July but this one is to Iraq) and whether or not he will stay in. And don't tell me people die from it! lol Not what I want to know!! Gah!!! I'd never seen a seizure before and it was seriously the scariest thing I've ever seen. Especially when I couldn't wake him up afterwards.

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