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  • #46
    Re: Multi Camo ?

    Didn't the soldiers in the first Transformers movie use multi-cam?

    Comment


    • #47
      Re: Multi Camo ?

      They are wearing the multi-cam in iraq currently

      Comment


      • #48
        Re: Multi Camo ?

        [QUOTE=stealth95]They are wearing the multi-cam in iraq currently[/QUOTE]


        How did a post from 2009 just get bumped?

        Comment


        • #49
          Re: Multi Camo ?

          Because Multi Cam is the Coolest!!! It has pockets and everything!!!!

          Comment


          • #50
            Re: Multi Camo ?

            The unit I deployed with tested multicams in 2007. I still have a pair.

            Comment


            • #51
              Re: Multi Camo ?

              ALCON,

              I pasted a URL about how the Army is now looking for a new camo. Here was the article without the URL.


              Besides the multi-cam that is the new camo for Afghanistan, has anyone heard about this? I heard there will be an article on it in the next Army Times.
              [URL="http://www.military.com/news/article/army-launches-program-to-field-new-camo.html?ESRC=eb.nl"][/URL]


              [B]Army Launches Program to Field New Camo[/B]

              December 14, 2010
              Military.com|by Christian Lowe


              [IMG]http://images.military.com/cs/Satellite?blobcol=urldata&blobheadername1=Content-Type&blobheadername2=Content-Disposition&blobheadervalue1=image%2Fjpeg&blobheadervalue2=inline%3Bfilename%3DNew-Army-Uniformlg12.14.jpg&blobkey=id&blobnocache=false&blobtable=MungoBlobs&blobwhere=1209994400483&ssbinary=true[/IMG] Less than five years after the Army fully outfitted Soldiers with uniforms printed in what it claimed was a single camouflage scheme suitable to all environments, the service launched a new search for a "family" of camo patterns that will help hide troops in deserts, forests and the places in between.
              During a meeting with civilian companies interested in pitching their designs Dec. 9, officials from the Program Executive Office Soldier explained that recent tests showed the Army's so-called "universal camouflage pattern" fell "significantly" short of keeping Soldiers hidden compared to other patterns.
              "We're looking for a family of patterns because that seems to make the most sense," said Col. Bill Cole, the top uniform buyer for the Army. "But if someone comes to us with a universal pattern that can meet the requirements, we'll go with it."
              The search for a new camouflage scheme comes on the heels of a recent revamp of Army camo worn by troops in Afghanistan
              Check out Military.com's [URL="http://www.military.com/benefits/resources/guide-to-military-uniforms-and-awards"][COLOR=#0000f0]Uniforms and Insignia Guide[/COLOR][/URL].
              In February, the Army announced it would field uniforms and issued kit in the so-called "MultiCam" pattern to all Soldiers deploying to Afghanistan or those with more than six months left on their deployment. Officials realized the current UCP made Soldiers stand out against the varied backgrounds of Afghanistan, which can include wooded forests, rocky outcroppings and scrubby deserts -- all in the same patrol.


              [URL="http://ad.doubleclick.net/click;h=v8/3a70/0/0/%2a/p;224330385;0-0;0;9018264;3823-300/100;37443268/37461145/1;;~sscs=%3fhttp://www.military.com/Entertainment/"][/URL]
              "The [MultiCam] allows the Soldiers to get far closer to potential enemies before being observed," said Command Sergeant Major of the Army Kenneth Preston in August. "I believe [Soldiers] are safer" wearing the MultiCam.
              But now the Army brass is prepared to abandon the current pattern in favor of three different uniforms designed for more specific environments. The service wants to see one pattern for wear in woodland or jungle environments, one pattern for desert and arid environments and a so-called "transitional" pattern that could be worn across all environments if needed.
              Officials also want a fourth pattern that blends with all three patterns and can be printed on gear such as body armor, magazine pouches and hydration systems so that the service doesn't have to buy the more expensive organizational clothing and individual equipment more than once.
              "It is difficult and expensive to manufacture the OCIE," Cole said. "Trousers and jackets are cheaper and they wear out quicker."
              Three companies will be selected next summer to compete against two Army-designed camo patterns that will be compared to patterns already in use, including the Navy's AOR-1 and AOR-2, MultiCam and the Marine Corps' woodland and desert camo, officials say.
              The Army plans to conduct field tests on the various patterns in a wide range of environments through the spring of 2012 with an eventual award to one camo pattern "family" in November 2012.
              It is unclear how the Army would field the three uniforms for a deployment such as Afghanistan. Cole speculated that Joes could be issued the transitional pattern to wear on day-to-day missions and have sets of the desert or woodland-patterned duds for times when missions or the environment dictate.
              "I do not want to predict yet what the answer would be," Cole said. "I can tell you that we would not issue all three patterns to troops in training on a regular basis just because of the cost implications involved."
              The program to outfit over one million active, reserve and National Guard Soldiers with new camo uniforms could cost billions and it is unclear whether the Army will fund such an expense when a winner is chosen in late 2012.
              But whichever family of patterns wins, officials argue they'll do everything they can to keep the decision as objective as possible.
              "This is not a fashion statement. It's based on performance and operational requirements," said Tim O'Neil, a camouflage expert and consultant to the Army program. "This will not be about how cool the new camouflage looks."



              © Copyright 2010 Military.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed

              Comment


              • #52
                Re: Multi Camo ?

                Soldiers who are deploying to Afghanistan are issued MultiCam ( uniforms & equipment). The pattern is currently only authorized for wear while in Afghanistan and cannot be worn anywhere else. There is much talk about changing the current pattern to something more suited for the current battlefields. I believe the ACU, like the beret, is here for the long run.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Re: Multi Camo ?

                  [QUOTE=SaindonPT;137769]Soldiers who are deploying to Afghanistan are issued MultiCam ( uniforms & equipment). The pattern is currently only authorized for wear while in Afghanistan and cannot be worn anywhere else. There is much talk about changing the current pattern to something more suited for the current battlefields. I believe the ACU, like the beret, is here for the long run.[/QUOTE]

                  It will be gone SSG. Go to armytimes dot com and scroll to the bottom. It is history and will be out in 2012.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Re: Multi Camo ?

                    Multicam is for Afghanistan. ACUs [I]are[/I] getting upgrades.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Re: Multi Camo ?

                      [QUOTE=fmcityslicker;137778]It will be gone SSG. Go to armytimes dot com and scroll to the bottom. It is history and will be out in 2012.[/QUOTE]

                      Here is the article that I found

                      [B]New camo coming

                      UCP is history as Army seeks 3 variants to cover global climates, environments[/B]



                      By Lance M. Bacon

                      [EMAIL="lbacon@militarytimes.com"][COLOR=#525252]lbacon@militarytimes.com[/COLOR][/EMAIL]

                      The Army is shopping for three new combat uniforms — a wood­land variant, a desert variant and a “transitional” variant that cov­ers everything in between.

                      As the search begins, it is evident the current Universal Camouflage Pattern is not even an option.

                      Officials are adamant that the selection will not be a “fashion contest” in which Pentagon generals pick the one they like best. Instead, hundreds of test hours and mountains of data will be compiled to determine the right mix of colors and patterns.

                      In the words of Col. William Cole, project manager of Soldier Protection and Individual Equip­ment, the intent is to provide an “ operationally and scientifically validated” camouflage pattern

                      that will provide global coverage for an expeditionary Army.

                      For now, the design and colors of your next uniform are anyone’s guess. For example, digital pat­terns work well in some environ­ments, but not as well in others. Sometimes a vertical orientation is best, while other times a horizontal would be optimal. And when it comes to colors, there are 15 differ­ent military operating environ­ments with unique colors that change with elevation and seasons.

                      UCP is dead

                      In providing details to industry, the Army appears not to be keen on keeping UCP, the three-color pattern fielded in 2004.

                      “The uniform I am wearing doesn’t do the best job of conceal­ing our soldiers,” said Maj. Brett Lord, who came from the Maneu­ver Center of Excellence at Fort Benning, Ga., to outline opera­tional capabilities.

                      Timothy O’Neill, who has taught the principles of camouflage at West Point for decades, said UCP has problems with isoluminance. Specifically, the fine texture and lack of contrast fades to gray at a short distance. Instead of the pat­tern blending in with the back­ground, the soldier looks like “a gray blotch.” “While it may sound counterin­tuitive, for a camouflage pattern to work, you have to see it,” O’Neill said.

                      In fact, UCP will not be among the baseline patterns used in the forthcoming tests. Instead, the Army will use the Operation Enduring Freedom Camouflage Pattern, or OCP, Woodland and Desert MARPAT (Marine Pattern) and AOR 1 and 2, which resemble the Marine desert and woodland digital patterns but are specially treated to reduce the wearer’s infrared signature.

                      The final nail in UCP’s coffin likely came by way of a Sept. 21 report that details how and why the Army selected the OEF Cam­ouflage Pattern, commonly called MultiCam. That process started when senior enlisted personnel deployed to Afghanistan expressed “serious concerns … regarding UCP ’ s camouflage effectiveness during combat operations,” accord­ing to the eight-page report, which was compiled by the Natick Sol­dier Research, Development and Engineering Center in Massachu­setts. In Afghanistan, it is not uncom­mon for a soldier to encounter a number of environments on a given day. And many said UCP failed to provide optimal camou­flage in any of them. A subsequent survey was developed for OEF vet­erans. The Army received 2,043 qualified responses from five posts, and it was soon clear that the UCP was “perceived to be not as effective as desired,” according to the report.

                      In fact, 43 percent of soldiers in southern Afghanistan preferred MultiCam, while 39 percent pre­ferred the Desert MARPAT, worn by the Marines. In the east, 47 per­cent of soldiers preferred Multi-Cam, while 26 percent preferred Desert MARPAT.

                      The Army followed by testing dozens of camouflage patterns in four backgrounds common to Afghanistan: The rocky desert ter­rain, mountainous terrain, crop­land/woodland terrain and sandy desert terrain. The top performers were MultiCam, Woodland and Desert MARPAT and AOR 1 and 2 uniforms. UCP, on the other hand, was in the bottom 10 for all four backgrounds “and did not perform well in any of them,” according to the report.


                      The way forward

                      The Army’s plans were provided to industry leaders Dec. 9 at the Army Cam­ouflage Improvement Industry Day, held at the Army Research Laboratory/Adelphi Laboratory Center outside Washington, D.C.

                      Developers now have until March 1 to come up with their solutions. The Army in July will select five contenders: three from industry and two from the government. Wear and field tests will follow. If all goes as planned, production will begin in Octo­ber 2012.

                      The Army is now taking this approach to the global scale to ensure soldiers have the best possible camouflage no matter where they go. As such, it is seeking “three pat­terns with common geometry [shapes] and different color palettes for different terrain [that] will be inexpensive to develop and effective across the globe.” The primary patterns will be woodland, desert and a transitional pattern. But cre­ating this worldwide camouflage won’t be as easy as it may seem.

                      For example, in the Afghanistan test against four backgrounds, none of the top 10 performers in the sandy desert terrain was in the top 10 for the other three back­grounds. In fact, many were in the bottom 10 in those tests. And those terrain tests were conducted in one operational area.

                      Charles Ryerson, of the Army’s Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab, was on hand to unravel the spaghetti mess called terrain analysis, and how it affects camouflage.

                      “It is a complex problem, to define what the world looks like,” he said.

                      There are three key factors, he said, but each is a moving target. The first is land cover. That may sound easy enough, but consider how the greens and browns of a European forest are far different than those found in a South American rain for­est. And not only are the colors different, but the textures and patterns are far dif­ferent. Next come seasonal concerns, known as phenology, and finally terrain/soil types, known as physiography. For the woodland pattern, defined by 40 percent or more tree coverage, the season­al changes are most important when seek­ing good camouflage, Ryerson said. In the desert pattern, defined as 15 percent or less plant coverage, the terrain and soil type will be the most important factors. And in the transitional pattern, the ter­rain and seasonal effects will be the most important factors.

                      Adding to the transitional pattern dis­cussion, O’Neill reminded industry that “no camouflage can hide every soldier everywhere.” With that understanding, he urged developers to focus on the “principle of invariance” — to match attributes that remain constant and not focus as much on the differences.

                      To test how well this is achieved, the Army will first use high-resolution pictures to determine how well the patterns blend with specific backgrounds. Field tests will also determine the average distance and time required to detect the camouflage.

                      While the Army is willing to consider any product, there are operational and finan­cial matters that are a no-go from the start, Cole said.

                      No 3-D camouflage is allowed. This means there can be no layers or “ghillie-type” items. The uniform must meet the Army’s 120-day operational durability requirements. In addition, the pattern cannot be altered or degraded when flame-resistance measures and permethrin treatments are applied.

                      What’s in it for you

                      The Army will spend as much as $10 million in the effort, and expects indus­try to meet three key goals. First is the obvious: The best possible concealment for soldiers deploying worldwide. This is defined as an optimized performance range of 35 to 400 meters in a woodland environ­ment and 35 to 500 meters in the transi­tional and desert environments.

                      Next, there must be compatibility with Personal Protective Equipment and Orga­nizational Clothing and Individual Equip­ment. This was a key complaint for four out of five soldiers who participated in the OCP report. But because it is more costly to pro­duce and has a far longer life span, this gear cannot be produced in all three varia­tions. Instead, it will come in either the transitional pattern, or a fourth pattern that blends elements of the woodland, desert and transitional, officials said. Either way, it must blend well with all three to allow soldiers to use the same gear with all camouflage patterns.

                      Lastly, the Army insists that the new uni­forms provide optimal sensor mitigation. Due to “the current proliferation of sensors on the battlefield,” the Army Uniform Pat­tern must mitigate near infrared and shortwave infrared at a distance of 35 to 250 meters, officials said.

                      It is unlikely that the individual soldier will be issued all three uniforms, Cole said. Instead, it is more likely that they will receive one, and stockpiles of the others will be kept in reserve.

                      In addition, the tests have caught the attention of the sister services. Representa­tives from the Air Force and Navy were in attendance, as were members of the British and Canadian forces. Lt. Col. Michael Sloane, product manager for Sol­dier Clothing and Individual Equipment, said the Army is willing to let the Marines’ MARPAT compete.

                      “If that is the best one out there, then we owe it to our soldiers to recognize that,” he said.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Re: Multi Camo ?

                        [QUOTE=SaindonPT;137769]Soldiers who are deploying to Afghanistan are issued MultiCam ( uniforms & equipment). The pattern is currently only authorized for wear while in Afghanistan and cannot be worn anywhere else. There is much talk about changing the current pattern to something more suited for the current battlefields. I believe the ACU, like the beret, is here for the long run.[/QUOTE]

                        Not ALL soldiers are getting it :)

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Re: Multi Camo ?

                          [QUOTE=SaindonPT;137769]Soldiers who are deploying to Afghanistan are issued MultiCam ( uniforms & equipment). The pattern is currently only authorized for wear while in Afghanistan and cannot be worn anywhere else. There is much talk about changing the current pattern to something more suited for the current battlefields. I believe the ACU, like the beret, is here for the long run.[/QUOTE]

                          Not ALL soldiers are getting it :)

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Re: Multi Camo ?

                            What does it matter what kind of base layer camo we are wearing in Afghanistan if the gear is still the digital pattern, or is the gear being changed to match as well?

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Re: Multi Camo ?

                              [QUOTE=cards8catcher;139502]What does it matter what kind of base layer camo we are wearing in Afghanistan if the gear is still the digital pattern, or is the gear being changed to match as well?[/QUOTE]

                              Manufacturers have to play catch up with what the US Military decides. Especially difficult if the pattern is completely new. It takes years for standard issue to become totally uniform. Most recently, this was common with ACU, BDU and DCU patterns being mixed amongst equipment.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Re: Multi Camo ?

                                [QUOTE=SteveLord;139503]Manufacturers have to play catch up with what the US Military decides. Especially difficult if the pattern is completely new. It takes years for standard issue to become totally uniform. Most recently, this was common with ACU, BDU and DCU patterns being mixed amongst equipment.[/QUOTE]

                                Let me point him to the new thread discussing this topic of uniforms! :-)
                                [url]http://www.nationalguard.com/forums/showthread.php/19945-Uniform-Changes-on-the-Horizon...-and-I-don-t-only-mean-buttons[/url]!

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