Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Medical Issues and Medical school? Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Medical Issues and Medical school?

    Are there any specific medical issues that one has to worry about inhibiting their acceptance in the US military? I mean, I have major depression and take medication everyday and I suffer from migraines which can be triggered by sunlight. Should I worry?

  • #2
    Medical School?

    Say I did ROTC at norwich, after my four years there could I go straight to med school and do my residency and then serve my time? Or would I have to serve after college for however long and [I]then[/I] go to med school?

    What are the National Guard options for going to Medical School?

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, what you have described is possible. I recommend applying for an [URL="http://www.1800goguard.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5145"]ARNG ROTC scholarship[/URL], which will keep you in the Guard after college. As soon as you have an acceptance letter to medical school, your State's AMEDD recruiter can convert you to a Med Service officer. There's a special code for medical school students. You'll still drill, but you're not deployable until after residency. You really should take this up with your State's AMEDD recruiter, because you'll want a thousand more details, and this forum is not the best place for that.

      Comment


      • #4
        [QUOTE=matthew.ritchie]Yes, what you have described is possible. I recommend applying for an [URL="http://www.1800goguard.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5145"]ARNG ROTC scholarship[/URL], which will keep you in the Guard after college. As soon as you have an acceptance letter to medical school, your State's AMEDD recruiter can convert you to a Med Service officer. There's a special code for medical school students. You'll still drill, but you're not deployable until after residency. You really should take this up with your State's AMEDD recruiter, because you'll want a thousand more details, and this forum is not the best place for that.[/QUOTE]

        Honestly I have been looking at the Millitary med school option. My conclusion is"
        If you are going to take that route because of the scholarship and med school bills, It is not worth it. The reason being that when you graduate, you are stuck in the millitary,and you can not really explore many options out there that civilian MD's have; besides if you are going in for a more challenging speciality, then the loan tap is really not an issue after graduation.
        So really, it's up to you if your are in for good in the millitary, basically lifetime then the above plan as you mentioned sounds good. On the other hand if you are just serving your enlistment period and hoping to go back to civilian living after that, then that is not a good idea. From a mentor I talk to, He said he likes the job he is doing, its very directional and the pay and benefits are great but if he had to do it over he would rather have stick to the Civilian practice route but still remained in the reserve soldier.
        Just an opinion., I myself I am still deciding what route to take.
        Last edited by christarmy1; March 23rd, 2009, 02:39 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yes, the AR 40-501 lists all the things that can disqualify you for military service.

          In regards to your depression, the regulation states:

          227. Learning, psychiatric and behavioral disorders
          d. Current mood disorders including, but not limited to, [B]major depression[/B] (296.23), bipolar (296.47), affective
          psychoses (296.89), depressive not otherwise specified (311), are disqualifying.
          (1) [B]History of mood disorders requiring outpatient care for longer than 6 months by a physician or other mental
          health professional [/B](V65.40), or inpatient treatment in a hospital or residential facility is disqualifying.
          (2) History of symptoms consistent with a mood disorder of a repeated nature that impairs school, social, or work
          efficiency is disqualifying

          As for headaches:
          226. Neurological disorders
          e. [B]History of recurrent headaches[/B] (784.0), including, but not limited to, [B]migraines[/B] (346) and tension headaches
          (307.81) that interfere with normal function in the past 3 years, or of such severity to require prescription medications,
          are disqualifying.

          Good luck.

          Comment


          • #6
            [QUOTE=christarmy1]Honestly I have been looking at the Millitary med school option. My conclusion is"
            If you are going to take that route because of the scholarship and med school bills, It is not worth it. The reason being that when you graduate, you are stuck in the millitary,and you can not really explore many options out there that civilian MD's have; besides if you are going in for a more challenging speciality, then the loan tap is really not an issue after graduation.
            So really, it's up to you if your are in for good in the millitary, basically lifetime then the above plan as you mentioned sounds good. On the other hand if you are just serving your enlistment period and hoping to go back to civilian living after that, then that is not a good idea. From a mentor I talk to, He said he likes the job he is doing, its very directional and the pay and benefits are great but if he had to do it over he would rather have stick to the Civilian practice route but still remained in the reserve soldier.
            Just an opinion., I myself I am still deciding what route to take.[/QUOTE]

            I disagree completely.

            In the state of NJ, if you attend a public med school like UMDNJ you'll receive full tuition remission in additional to all the other benefits under the ASR program.
            Your commitment is part-time and deployments have tended to be shorter.
            Also, while your total commitment is quite long, as far as I can tell you are making rank extremely quickly in the Medical Corp.
            Also remember that the NG and the Army Reserve are two separate entities. Under the NG, you commitment is to the Guard and in the Reserves your commitment is essentially to the entire active duty Army.

            Comment


            • #7
              Regardless of the med school issues you would be disqualified on your medical issues alone...QuantumRN listed the regulations!

              Comment


              • #8
                [QUOTE=matthew.ritchie]Yes, what you have described is possible. I recommend applying for an [URL="http://www.1800goguard.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5145"]ARNG ROTC scholarship[/URL], which will keep you in the Guard after college. As soon as you have an acceptance letter to medical school, your State's AMEDD recruiter can convert you to a Med Service officer. There's a special code for medical school students. You'll still drill, but you're not deployable until after residency. You really should take this up with your State's AMEDD recruiter, because you'll want a thousand more details, and this forum is not the best place for that.[/QUOTE]
                Definitely talk to the AMEDD recruiter. Here are a few things you need to make sure are available to you before signing:

                1. Availability of a MS officer slot. If you can "apply" but are not guaranteed a slot and wind up in a non-medical, deployable slot, you are SOL for medical school. Deployable folks have been pulled out of med school and they've lost years.
                2. Availability of Flexi-Training. This is available to many med students and residents, but is up to the discretion of your CO. Flexi-Training allows you to not attend drills now and then if your study schedule demands it. Being in a unit that is physician-heavy make this a good possibility. Most folks do not understand the tempo of medical school and don't understand that your time is not your own to schedule. If you can not get this option, and need to drill once per month at a time not of your choosing, you will be seriously hampering your med school education.
                3. Your brain power. Med school is a grind and even folks who are pretty bright struggle just to pass. Make sure you are an extremely strong student before taking it. Most average students find they do not have any spare time. The extra time required by the Guard could be enough to knock you out if you don't go in expecting it.

                The conventional wisdom is that ROTC in general is not a good idea if you are on the medical school path. For general Army, if you take ROTC, you owe four years after finishing. You can apply to have that time waived during four years of medical school and three to seven years of residency, but there is not guarantee of this happening. Folks who have been in ROTC have had this denied and had to complete their four years of service prior to attending medical school.

                I'm in med school and the National Guard and can answer any other questions you might have, if you'd like. Best of luck.

                Comment


                • #9
                  If you have MAJOR DEPRESSION. Don't you think that may be an issue with joining the ARMY. I mean lets think about this realistically. We train outside ALOT and if you have sun induced headaches that would be an issue as well. I'm sorry, but you have a legit disorder that disqualifies you from military service. Take care of yourself, the army is not the place for you.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    [quote=shutterm4]If you have MAJOR DEPRESSION. Don't you think that may be an issue with joining the ARMY. I mean lets think about this realistically. We train outside ALOT and if you have sun induced headaches that would be an issue as well. I'm sorry, but you have a legit disorder that disqualifies you from military service. Take care of yourself, the army is not the place for you.[/quote]


                    Wrong wrong wrong...
                    Psychological studies shows that increase activity, consistency and social interaction will help reduce the severity of deppression and possibly elliminate it. Off course this depends on the level of depression.

                    IF he or she can by any means get a waiver, this will be a great thing for her.

                    P/S: RN should know this.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      [QUOTE=christarmy1]Wrong wrong wrong...
                      Psychological studies shows that increase activity, consistency and social interaction will help reduce the severity of deppression and possibly elliminate it. Off course this depends on the level of depression.

                      IF he or she can by any means get a waiver, this will be a great thing for her.

                      P/S: RN should know this.[/QUOTE]

                      I've made it pretty clear on this forum that I am not a proponent of medical waivers. There are some cases in which they are warranted, but IMO, [B]definitely[/B] not in the case above. The Army isn't the place to fix anyones psychological disorders. I would recommend getting social interaction working at a mall versus the Army so that you are not put anyones lives in danger.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        [QUOTE=christarmy1]Wrong wrong wrong...
                        Psychological studies shows that increase activity, consistency and social interaction will help reduce the severity of deppression and possibly elliminate it. Off course this depends on the level of depression.

                        IF he or she can by any means get a waiver, this will be a great thing for her.

                        P/S: RN should know this.[/QUOTE]

                        Depression and BCT are not a good mix. BCT was a horribly depressing time for me - being away from family and friends for 3 months with little contact. Waiting for mail, and finding there weren't any letters for me, etc. I don't suffer from any form of depression, but I could only imagine how it would have compunded things for me. Was still a great time, I enjoyed BCT and would do it again if I was given the opportunity, but depression + BCT (or a deployment for that manner) wouldn't, in my opinion, be a very good idea. :p

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=christarmy1]Psychological studies shows that increase activity, consistency and social interaction will help reduce the severity of deppression and possibly elliminate it. Off course this depends on the level of depression.[/quote]
                          Recommending the Army as a therapeutic environment is criminally bad advice. Mood and/or personality disorders are damaged and aggravated by high stress environments.
                          [QUOTE=christarmy1]IF he or she can by any means get a waiver, this will be a great thing for her.[/QUOTE]
                          The poster has specifically mentioned that he currently suffers from "major depression". Putting someone currently suffering from major depression in a high stress, high intensity environment is an excellent way to lead to a breakdown or suicide. The increased activity and social interaction that help depression are things like softball teams and book clubs, not crawling through mud under barbed wire while someone fires blanks over your head and screams at you.

                          Nothing personal, but your advice is way off-base.

                          OP- If you are currently being treated for mental illness, you will be unlikely to get a waiver. If time passes and you have conquered your illness, you can apply and will probably be referred to an Army-approved psychiatrist/psychologist who will evaluate you to judge the likelihood of relapse if placed in high stress environments. If they feel you are in good shape, they may waiver you.
                          Last edited by notyetdead; March 30th, 2009, 01:46 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            [quote=notyetdead]Recommending the Army as a therapeutic environment is criminally bad advice. Mood and/or personality disorders are damaged and aggravated by high stress environments.

                            The poster has specifically mentioned that he currently suffers from "major depression". Putting someone currently suffering from major depression in a high stress, high intensity environment is an excellent way to lead to a breakdown or suicide. The increased activity and social interaction that help depression are things like softball teams and book clubs, not crawling through mud under barbed wire while someone fires blanks over your head and screams at you.

                            Nothing personal, but your advice is way off-base.

                            OP- If you are currently being treated for mental illness, you will be unlikely to get a waiver. If time passes and you have conquered your illness, you can apply and will probably be referred to an Army-approved psychiatrist/psychologist who will evaluate you to judge the likelihood of relapse if placed in high stress environments. If they feel you are in good shape, they may waiver you.[/quote]



                            ...........Oh, i see............

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=christarmy1]...........Oh, i see............[/QUOTE]

                              You see? Have you been to BCT? Do you have any idea what it's like? You do realize that life in the military is a heck of a lot more stressful then the typical life of a civilian, right...?

                              Righto.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X