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My first RSP in [too much] detail...

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  • #16
    Re: My first RSP in [too much] detail...

    I must say, everyone's post sounds different from my RSP site. We drill in Henderson, TN. We do not stay overnight, but we do the 2 day drill one weekend a month. I've been to about 4 drills now and will be shipping out next year when I graduate high school. The way our RSP goes is, we arrive at 0800 and get in formation immediately. We stretch with PL's leading, and get ready for the morning PT Test. We do our PT tests, come in and weigh ourselves and see how tall we are. (Too see if your body is in tune the way it should be.) We then go to class, where someone always tends to get smokes while having to repeat everything the instructor is saying, while saying some meaningless phrase afterwards, such as: "Safety is what will save your life. I am a chicken, and a coward.") Then after class, we eat at 1200, once we have eaten, at 1230 we start PT. We get out around 1600 and go home, then come back the next day and do it all over again, but this is where the hard PT starts.

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    • #17
      Re: My first RSP in [too much] detail...

      [QUOTE=Jgradu]Which RSP do you attend? I just got a assigned to the one out of Rice Lake, WI.[/QUOTE]
      Green Bay, WI. Co. D

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      • #18
        Re: My first RSP in [too much] detail...

        [QUOTE=PvtYoung]I must say, everyone's post sounds different from my RSP site. We drill in Henderson, TN. We do not stay overnight, but we do the 2 day drill one weekend a month. I've been to about 4 drills now and will be shipping out next year when I graduate high school. The way our RSP goes is, we arrive at 0800 and get in formation immediately. We stretch with PL's leading, and get ready for the morning PT Test. We do our PT tests, come in and weigh ourselves and see how tall we are. (Too see if your body is in tune the way it should be.) We then go to class, where someone always tends to get smokes while having to repeat everything the instructor is saying, while saying some meaningless phrase afterwards, such as: "Safety is what will save your life. I am a chicken, and a coward.") Then after class, we eat at 1200, once we have eaten, at 1230 we start PT. We get out around 1600 and go home, then come back the next day and do it all over again, but this is where the hard PT starts.[/QUOTE]
        We did the hight and weight thing too but I was a guest so i didn't do it and I guess i just included that with the PT. Sorry i left it out.

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        • #19
          Re: My first RSP in [too much] detail...

          [U][/U][/U][QUOTE=chd][Summary/tips at the end if you don't want to read the whole thing…]

          We were told to arrive at 0800, but most people were there by 0730. The first-timers separated into a classroom where we filled out paperwork, reviewed the material in the Stripes for Skills program, and watched "The Way of the Warrior: From RSP to BCT," which was good. The other recruits worked with M-16's.

          At 1200, we had chow, which consisted of lousy catered pasta, meatballs and salad. We spent the whole afternoon drilling D&C, practicing all of the basic movements, formations, faces, saluting, etc. The 31B’s took an hour to meet with a MP 1LT, who was funny and informative. He confirmed that my unit would be deploying as part of JTF GTMO, which is great news despite knowing that I’ll be away for seventeen of the next nineteen months. Chow was at 1700, which was again lousy catered food. We were given the evening off to study in our barracks.

          Our barracks were Quonset huts from the 1940’s, decrepit, unheated and just large to enough to barely fit sixteen cots. I was older than most of the recruits, but I could appreciate all of the sophomoric humor despite the overuse of profanity and “yo,” which I’ve learned is often used to end every 17-21 year-olds’ sentence. Despite not being allowed tobacco products and cell phones, some crept in the barracks despite the fact that our bags were completely searched. It was like summer camp, kids running around the post all night, making trouble, all the good stuff – while the cadre slept in a cabin down the way. Boys will be boys, I guess. Lights out was 2200, but the pizzas didn’t come until 2210, so the lights went out around 2300. I just watched for most of the evening and I'd recommend that no one attempts to bend the rules their first time, if ever.

          Don't show up to your seventh drill without knowing your general orders and don't rat anyone out to the cadre. One could result in getting a garbage can of snow and ice dumped on you while you sleep and the other could result in the RSP version of a blanket party, if you could even call it that. Not that I witnessed either or even know any of the participants, but I'm just saying.

          Formation in the morning was supposed to be at 0600, but the cadre called for us at 0535. Fortunately, most of us were up at 0450, so it wasn’t a big deal. After changing formations for a while, we did some pushups, flutter kicks and stretching. What ensued was an embarrassment. We went on a formation run at a 10:00 mile pace. Kids were falling out, puking on the side of the road and just plain sucking. After a half-mile, we switched into ability groups and there were still kids walking and puking all over the place. We finished up with more stretching and a few more pushups and flutter kicks. After personal hygiene, we had lousy morning chow.

          At 0830, we had a first aid class with a SFC combat medic, who gave a great presentation on evaluating injuries, splinting, stopping bleeding and ways to carry a wounded soldier. At 1030, we did drills carrying wounded soldiers by their vests, on a seat made by two sets of arms (if that makes sense), a fireman’s carry and a 4-man litter evacuation. My partner and I carried a 285 lb. kid on a seat made by our arms and I had to fireman carry my 270 lb. partner. The smaller and younger recruits seemed to enjoy that. It was fun.

          We had MRE’s for chow and we weren’t allowed to use the heaters indoors. Rice and beans, imitation pork chop, manicotti, etc. don’t quite taste so great cold. After chow, we did D&C drills for a while before being dismissed at 1400.

          Summary/tips:

          - RSP is a great program. If it fits your schedule as far as when you want to ship to BCT, it would be a great experience to attend at least 3-4 drills. It’s amazing how much you’ll learn.

          - I was very impressed with the recruits who had been in the program for a few months. They had excellent demeanor, knowledge and just seemed well squared away. Conversely, some recruits in the program that long stood out, because they were still lagging. They had no excuse.

          - Definitely learn your general orders and ranks before you attend. While it was funny to hear a SFC call for a celebration when someone said that he was a GEN, you don’t want to be that guy. Soldier’s creed, Army Values and phonetic alphabet would be the next things I’d learn if I had time. I knew all of that and never had a problem with a pop quiz to keep my spot in the chow line.

          - No one was “smoked” besides a couple kids that had their hands in their pockets. They did pushups, flutter kicks and mountain climbers until they could do neither anymore, recovered and repeated. The worst group punishment was 20 pushups. Usually, it was “drop and give me 10.” Not difficult.

          - Ask the other recruits what to do. You’ll be lost for much of your first day regarding the details. While most will correct you to prevent some extra PT, take it upon yourself to ask questions on the right way to do things.

          - Practice PT! If you can't do a pushup, flutter kicks for 30 seconds or jog for a couple miles, get started! Don't be the guy who can't do one pushup or pukes two minutes into a double-time formation "run."

          - Listen to your cadre. Pay attention to detail. Don’t be a jerk. Pay attention to detail.[/QUOTE]
          Very good info.

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