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  • Someone ask me a private question and this is my answer.

    Listen the hardest thing you will ever do is the road marches. You have between 50 and 75 lbs in your ruck pack and you have to march 2 to 5 miles maybe more. It is truly the hardest thing you will ever do in basic besides the Gas Chamber.(that was an experience) The smokings will be hard but they are just mind games as long as you try they will not punish you in any way just never give up. If you can't do another push up just keep trying just never stop all together. Listen I am 35 in basic and Im keeping up with the 17 year olds. Its cake as long as you have the right attitude. If you want to be there and you will always place the mission first you will not have a prob. keep your mouth shut don't be a clown dont even let the drill sgt know you for bad reasons. When your spoken to be loud and confident sound off like you have a pair even if you don't. Its a mental game There are female soldiers in my platoon. 5' 120lbs and some are out doing me. Well ok they arent really but they are right there with me. I get my strength from them. When I want to quit I look at one of them and think "I don't think so" and I march on. I love basic it challenges me every turn I make. I will miss it when I am gone.

    "What makes the green grass grow?" "Blood, Blood, Bright Red Blood, makes the Green Grass Grow Drill Sgt"



    Hooah!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! All the way

  • #2
    what was the private question? I am in a marching band, will I be able to hang in bct? then your answer came lol.

    To me, the road marches (the ones were you kept your interval and weapons outbound) were cake but the forced road marches werent. I think USMC711 can agree with me on this. In the Corps, we had to do a forced march holding onto the pistol belt of the recruit in front of us moving at a fast pace (similar to the march in full metal jacket) if we lost grip, the Drill Instructor will say real loud "AT&T" and we respond even louder "Reach out and touch someone sir!!" for the whole 10 miles lol. I hated that day. My shins were burning.

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    • #3
      re

      The marches for me is really nothing. I don't like the sound of the forced march while holding on to someone. That sounds a little difficult but I am sure it all worked out. I find basic fun and somewhat challenging. I miss my kids and family very much. If someone ask me what is the hardest part of Basic I would saying missing my family the rest is just will power. . I can honestly say I love this S@#%. But the question was someone had gotten hurt earlier and wanted to know if they would have any problems down range when basic started. I said it was all in what you want.........

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      • #4
        I never had a problem with road marches, they were my favorite form of PT to do

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        • #5
          [QUOTE=WO1 Quinones]what was the private question? I am in a marching band, will I be able to hang in bct? then your answer came lol.

          To me, the road marches (the ones were you kept your interval and weapons outbound) were cake but the forced road marches werent. I think USMC711 can agree with me on this. In the Corps, we had to do a forced march holding onto the pistol belt of the recruit in front of us moving at a fast pace (similar to the march in full metal jacket) if we lost grip, the Drill Instructor will say real loud "AT&T" and we respond even louder "Reach out and touch someone sir!!" for the whole 10 miles lol. I hated that day. My shins were burning.[/QUOTE]

          I never understood that whole "weapon facing out" thing while in BCT, or PLDC, or any other school where a roadmarch was mandatory (OCS too). So, if I'm on the right side, I need to hold my weapon as if I'm left handed so it can face out, but if we take contact, I will need to switch hands in order to return fire?

          I'm glad in real life it doesn't work like that. Even in Infantry school, I just posed that question (based on prior schools) and I think the remark was "that's one of the dumbest things I've ever heard"

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          • #6
            Really, the worst part about marches [U]are[/U] the intervals. Because there's always a few people that don't keep em and when the DS make them fix it, you're either slowing down/stopping or running to catch up.

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            • #7
              [QUOTE=SteveLord]Really, the worst part about marches [U]are[/U] the intervals. Because there's always a few people that don't keep em and when the DS make them fix it, you're either slowing down/stopping or running to catch up.[/QUOTE]

              You are right about that. I kept tellin this one guy to move up b/c there was like a fball field length in front of him and he told me to shut the **** up (all the talking was soft) It was driving me crazy. Not 3 mins later our DS tears him a new one.

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              • #8
                Wow! Basic sure has changed. I went to Ft. Leonard Wood in the hot, drooling summer of 1985. Yep, I will always be an Engineer. We did a rediculous road march of 22 miles. I am not kidding you. We started at 03:00and ended at near 05:00 hours the next morning. Yes...26 hours. It was the hardest, most grueling thing I ever did in my life, but I made it. There was a "paddy wagon" at the back picking up drop outs. I was warned by my "Rep 63" instructors (now the RSP program) about this march and sure enough it happened. Oh the blisters!

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                • #9
                  [QUOTE=SSG KC]Wow! Basic sure has changed. I went to Ft. Leonard Wood in the hot, drooling summer of 1985. Yep, I will always be an Engineer. We did a rediculous road march of 22 miles. I am not kidding you. We started at 03:00and ended at near 05:00 hours the next morning. Yes...26 hours. It was the hardest, most grueling thing I ever did in my life, but I made it. There was a "paddy wagon" at the back picking up drop outs. I was warned by my "Rep 63" instructors (now the RSP program) about this march and sure enough it happened. Oh the blisters![/QUOTE]

                  22 miles in 26 hours is very slow. Were you smoked whilst you were doing it ?

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                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=SSG KC] We did a rediculous road march of 22 miles. I am not kidding you. We started at 03:00and ended at near 05:00 hours the next morning. Yes...26 hours. It was the hardest, most grueling thing I ever did in my life, but I made it. There was a "paddy wagon" at the back picking up drop outs. I was warned by my "Rep 63" instructors (now the RSP program) about this march and sure enough it happened. Oh the blisters![/QUOTE]

                    Sounds like the manchu mile they do in Korea

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                    • #11
                      We encountered tasks along the way and we wet bulbed and was forced to rest for a couple of hours. The length of time really wasn't what was important. I was just wondering if 2-5 miles is the norm now. Maybe each training station does it different.

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                      • #12
                        Sill

                        At Fort Sill we did 12 miles in a little over 3 hours, encountering three "ambushes". We were told it was a graduation requirement. The first road march in Basic kicked everyone's butt, and it was only two miles. They gradually built us up thankfully. My grandfather told me he did 26 miles during his four week basic prior to being deployed to the Pacific during WWII. He was voluntold to be a medic and treated all the blisters etc...

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                        • #13
                          The road marches are fun but I enjoyed UAC and Pugel. There were several broke and separated ribs and sprains of every kind. TMC had a field day after UAC.

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                          • #14
                            [QUOTE=SSG KC]We encountered tasks along the way and we wet bulbed and was forced to rest for a couple of hours. The length of time really wasn't what was important. I was just wondering if 2-5 miles is the norm now. Maybe each training station does it different.[/QUOTE]

                            The way the marches were supposed to be in basic training for us were as follows.
                            3k
                            5k
                            8k
                            10k
                            10k
                            15k

                            Instead, we did a 22k to take the place of the last 10 and 15k's. 22k is like 13 miles, and that sucked. Fort knox has the worst hills i have ever seen, but i did it and had stress fractures at that.

                            Roadmarches suck, but they are all mind power. If you have the will to complete it you will get the job done. We were told that the weapon facing out was so you didnt flag the other side, Fortunately my squad always was on the left, so being right handed worked out. They didnt really pay that much attention to which way our weapon was pointed, it was all about speed for us, the marches were at a really fast paced walk and almost a jog which just made it suck more.

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                            • #15
                              Benning finale was a 24miler...with tasks along the way. Sometimes hauling ammo cans full of sand for a mile and sometimes hauling dead/wounded bodies a mile. Ammo cans wouldn't be bad, but their handles are just thin metal rods that are painful to the fingers. Oh, and the biggest guys always got killed! We were suppose to do a stream crossing and rock descend or something, but supposedly the battallion commander scratched them off the list. It was during January and nobody had sniffle gear at that time. This also canceled the 5 mile company run.

                              At the end we had the infantry grog...in the cold rain. Rumors of a "mandatory 24hr profile/rest" post march were quickly debunked as we were certainly not free of that. My longest march and I didn't even blister on that. Must be the skids I have for feet. But I sure was broke as hll.
                              Last edited by SteveLord; December 31st, 2008, 09:48 PM.

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