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  • Army ROTC Early Commissioning Program

    ECP is a little known program available at only a very few schools in America. The Early Commissioning program pays for your college education, commissions you after your sophomore year and promotes you to First Lieutenant upon graduation from college. No other Army program provides you as much opportunity or as much benefit!

    You can apply for a scholarship if you:

    Have minimum cumulative high school GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale
    Have minimum SAT score of 920 (Math and Verbal sections only), or ACT score of 19
    Pass Department of Defense Medical Examination (arranged and paid for by Army ROTC)
    Pass Army height/weight and physical fitness standards
    Are between 17 and 27 years of age
    U.S. citizen of good moral character (original naturalization document issued by INS or state issued birth certificate)

    The Early Commisioning program (ECP) is available only at five schools in America: They are Valley Forge Military College ([url]www.vfmac.edu)[/url], Marion Military College ([url]www.marionmilitary.edu[/url]) Wentworth Military Academy ([url]www.wma.edu)[/url], New Mexico Military Institute ([url]www.nmmi.edu[/url]) and Georgia Military Insitute ([url]www.gmc.cc.ga.us)[/url]. They are all great schools and offer terrific programs.

    For Valley Forge you can call, 610-989-1300 and ask for Col. Mat Bowe.

  • #2
    We have a guy in our unit like this. Came in as a 2LT but still had 2 years of college to go. So he gets 2 years of Natl Guard experience before going off to Active Duty land. Pretty sweet gig

    Not sure what Jr military college he went to

    Comment


    • #3
      [QUOTE=Happy_Warrior]ECP is a little known program available at only a very few schools in America. The Early Commissioning program pays for your college education, commissions you after your sophomore year and promotes you to First Lieutenant upon graduation from college. No other Army program provides you as much opportunity or as much benefit!

      You can apply for a scholarship if you:
      [LIST=1][*]Have minimum cumulative high school GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale [*]Have minimum SAT score of 920 (Math and Verbal sections only), or ACT score of 19 [*]Pass Department of Defense Medical Examination (arranged and paid for by Army ROTC) [*]Pass Army height/weight and physical fitness standards [*]Are between 17 and 27 years of age [*]U.S. citizen of good moral character (original naturalization document issued by INS or state issued birth certificate)[/LIST]Visit [url]http://www.vfmac.edu/ecp.html[/url] and get in touch with your future. Or call, 610-989-1300 and ask for Col. Mat Bowe.[/QUOTE]

      Be careful, folks. It's not for everyone. If you can follow the plan, it will work, but not everyone who starts this path has the drive and coherence to finish it.

      Comment


      • #4
        What's the difference between Junior military colleges like Marion, Valley forge and the Senior military colleges such as Norwich, VMI, Virgina Tech, Texas A&M and North Georgia college and state university. What is your opinions on all those schools

        Comment


        • #5
          What is the difference .....

          [QUOTE=CTAuxie]What's the difference between Junior military colleges like Marion, Valley forge and the Senior military colleges such as Norwich, VMI, Virgina Tech, Texas A&M and North Georgia college and state university. What is your opinions on all those schools[/QUOTE]

          The first difference would be size. The two year military colleges which offer ECP are typically small schools, under 500. Norwich, VMI, The Citadel run around 2000 with VT and Texas A&M much larger than that. A two year college offers only an Associate’s degree, not a Bachelors degree and to keep your ECP commission, you have to transfer to a 4 year college with ROTC and complete your Bachelors. The two year college has a much better track record getting people to their Bachelors degree than someplace like Penn State, where almost 40% of starting students don't make it into their junior years. I am not sure of the figures for the other schools, but we will graduate approximately 90% of our students and of that 90%, 98% get the transfer school they want. I believe the other schools are about the same.

          From a commissioning standpoint, the [B][U]big[/U][/B] advantage is you get your commission two years before the vast majority of your peers. You would be a First Lieutenant or a Second Lieutenant promotable, when your peers are just getting commissioned. When you are being considered for higher ranks, you are still ahead of your peers.

          From a money standpoint, qualify, keep your grades up and the Army will pay for almost all your education, including the college you transfer to.

          Comment


          • #6
            [QUOTE=Happy_Warrior]

            From a commissioning standpoint, the [B][U]big[/U][/B] advantage is you get your commission two years before the vast majority of your peers. You would be a First Lieutenant or a Second Lieutenant promotable, when your peers are just getting commissioned. When you are being considered for higher ranks, you are still ahead of your peers.
            .[/QUOTE]

            I see what you are saying, but there are still requirements that we have to meet in order to fulfill career goals. Sure, it's nice from a money standpoint to have that rank sooner...

            There were a few ECPs in IOBC with me, and just like the new 2LTs that were going out into the force, there will still be requirements for them to be a PL, then XO, Staff...then try to get a command. It's not like you are going to come out as a "new" 1LT and merely because of that they (being your chain of command) forgo the need for you to be a PL and toss you into an XO slot.

            Either way, it seems like a good idea for some. I personally would rather have school completed and be able to focus on a graduate program or simply my career...rather than being commissioned and knowing that I had two years of school left. Not to mention if you are an ECP in a guard program you have to fulfill a role as a PL or some other capacity but are basically worthless because for the next 3 years (2 more years of school and then basic courses) you are non-deployable. :eek:

            Comment


            • #7
              [QUOTE=Happy_Warrior]The first difference would be size. The two year military colleges which offer ECP are typically small schools, under 500. Norwich, VMI, The Citadel run around 2000 with VT and Texas A&M much larger than that. A two year college offers only an Associate’s degree, not a Bachelors degree and to keep your ECP commission, you have to transfer to a 4 year college with ROTC and complete your Bachelors. The two year college has a much better track record getting people to their Bachelors degree than someplace like Penn State, where almost 40% of starting students don't make it into their junior years. I am not sure of the figures for the other schools, but we will graduate approximately 90% of our students and of that 90%, 98% get the transfer school they want. I believe the other schools are about the same.

              From a commissioning standpoint, the [B][U]big[/U][/B] advantage is you get your commission two years before the vast majority of your peers. You would be a First Lieutenant or a Second Lieutenant promotable, when your peers are just getting commissioned. When you are being considered for higher ranks, you are still ahead of your peers.

              From a money standpoint, qualify, keep your grades up and the Army will pay for almost all your education, including the college you transfer to.[/QUOTE]

              So what is the difference between the Senior military colleges. What's the difference between Norwich, VMI, VT, North Georgia and Texas A&M.

              Comment


              • #8
                The Citadel, Norwich, VMI, VT, North Georgia and Texas A&M are all state or private 4 year colleges which offer a variety of majors and ROTC. Unlike the academies, you don't have to take a commision. All great schools. I would recommend The Citadel in Charleston S.C. (I'm a grad.) but check them all out.

                Comment


                • #9
                  [QUOTE=Happy_Warrior]The Citadel, Norwich, VMI, VT, North Georgia and Texas A&M are all state or private 4 year colleges which offer a variety of majors and ROTC. Unlike the academies, you don't have to take a commision. All great schools. I would recommend The Citadel in Charleston S.C. (I'm a grad.) but check them all out.[/QUOTE]

                  What is the difference in terms of how they treat you. Their Corp of cadets and how dose it compare to all of them

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=CTAuxie]What is the difference in terms of how they treat you. Their Corp of cadets and how dose it compare to all of them[/QUOTE]

                    How do you think they are going to treat you? Being a first year "probie?" Everyone goes through the indoc which in theory is "tear down and build back up". You'll learn what you need to become a 2LT. So don't sweat it. Everybody wants to become a officer! Are you willing to give your all? You best get in shape and run high 1st class APFT 290 or higher, Shoot expert, and put your NCO's and troops first! There is more to being a "O" than just a BA/BS and a GT of 120!:D
                    Last edited by SFC_Wilson; April 10th, 2011, 04:41 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      [QUOTE=Happy_Warrior]
                      From a commissioning standpoint, the [B][U]big[/U][/B] advantage is you get your commission two years before the vast majority of your peers. You would be a First Lieutenant or a Second Lieutenant promotable, when your peers are just getting commissioned. When you are being considered for higher ranks, you are still ahead of your peers.
                      [/QUOTE]

                      I wouldn't really call this an advantage. You're really not ahead of your peers when you're going to OBC with them. Like LT_77 stated, you're really useless to your unit until the completion of OBC. And if you choose to go Active Duty than you're comming up on CPT and your peers have had PL time and you haven't.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        How they treat you?

                        [QUOTE=CTAuxie]What is the difference in terms of how they treat you. Their Corp of cadets and how dose it compare to all of them[/QUOTE]

                        Frankly, I do not think anyone enjoys (enjoyed) the Plebe System. It is difficult and challenging. Anyone who would say differently is not telling you the truth. I suspect it is much like basic, while trying to study.

                        That said, at the four year schools the Plebe System goes on for the entire freshman year. At the ECP schools, the Plebe System goes on for a couple of months. I went through the Plebe System at The Citadel years ago, so I really cannot compare which is currently tougher / easier. But frankly, if you are looking for easy duty be enlisted, you only have to do what you are told.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=RedLeg]I wouldn't really call this an advantage. You're really not ahead of your peers when you're going to OBC with them. Like LT_77 stated, you're really useless to your unit until the completion of OBC. And if you choose to go Active Duty than you're comming up on CPT and your peers have had PL time and you haven't.[/QUOTE]

                          As an ECP LT, even if he had fake PL time before going to OBC, it doesn't count if you're going Regular Army. That LT will get his minimum 6 months PL time (which will go by in a flash). The only advantage I see is from a financial standpoint, but money is the least motivating factor for even halfway decent officers. I'd rather have a platoon for a year or more.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            What I am trying to say is, how dose each school compare it self in terms of Corp of Cadets. How dose the National Guard view them. How dose the plebe system in the federal academies compares to Norwich, Citadel, VMI, VT, North Georgia and Texas A&M. What's the difference between Norwich's Rook year, VMI Rat year, Texas A&M Fish year and VT Rat year.
                            Last edited by SFC_Wilson; April 10th, 2011, 04:45 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=WO1 Quinones]The same goes here. What you are trying to accomplish with your advertisements; there should be some discretion with your opinions. The junior enlisted are the greatest assets to the armed forces. They are the work horses that accomplish the mission.[/QUOTE]


                              Very politically correct response :D

                              Good job. I'm a bit more unpolished :o

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