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  • Quit, yes I said quit....?

    How do you get out of the ARNG? I haven't gone to basic nor do I plan on going.

    My best friend is a SGT in the Guard, he sais, don't quit, just do it and you'll be better off.

    Just want some info.

    Swore in last month, Salt Lake City
    _________________________________________________________________

    Also....what is it like in Fort Jackson, South Carolina???

  • #2
    From my understanding when you went to MEPS you didn't actually "swear in." When you report to ship out to basic they repeat the process of the oath which is after you sign the contract. At that point you are actually "in." At least that was how it worked in 1999. Sorry to hear you changed your mind.

    Comment


    • #3
      I swore in. I was escorted to a little red room with flags and had a sergeant read me the "Oath of Enlistment"...(to defend the Constitution). I raised my right hand and swore I would serve. After that I signed more paperwork. Then I flew home.

      Comment


      • #4
        Unless that paperwork was your contract ( which I believe it wasn't because it is normally signed before they take you to the airport to report to Basic) you are not "in." I did a mock oath when I went to MEPS to do my physical, and then when I reported on my shipping out date, I did it again. Another thing to mention is that it is the contract that is legally binding, not the oath. It is just ceremonial. You should know whether you signed the contract or not.
        Last edited by mmf25; October 5th, 2007, 04:59 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          [QUOTE=mmf25]Unless that paperwork was your contract ( which I believe it wasn't because it is normally signed before they take you to the airport to report to Basic) you are not "in." I did a mock oath when I went to MEPS to do my physical, and then when I reported on my shipping out date, I did it again. Another thing to mention is that it is the contract that is legally binding, not the oath. It is just ceremonial. You should know whether you signed the contract or not.[/QUOTE]

          This is the case with the active component, but not with the Army National Guard. Because the Guard is a dual-status component (both state and federal), once you swear the oath, you are indeed "in." That's why our new Soldiers drill for pay at RSP prior to shipping to Basic, and can draw Federal Tuition Assistance, and other benefits. That's also why the active component is looking into a procedure whereby someone wanting to get on active duty would first enlist into the local Guard unit for a few months, drill with the RSP, then ship to active duty.

          My recommendation for the original poster "Matt" is that he very carefully weighs and considers the implications of an entry-level separation. Take a look at the many messages on this forum to the effect of, "Ten years ago I enlisted, then got an entry-level separation. I now realize how dumb I was, and want to get back in." Because such individuals are considered "glossary non-prior service" (a regulatory category meaning that you joined but never completed your initial obligation) they are ineligible for a bonus until they complete their original obligation. Additionally, they are far behind on their career and retirement points than they would have been had they stayed in.

          By no means do I claim that everyone should be in the Guard, or that everyone in the Guard should stay -- as a Recruiter, some of my worst experiences dealt with certain individuals I kept out of the Guard; as a unit commander, some of my best experiences were helping Soldiers transition out. My concern (based on encounters on this forum and in the field) is that the individual do what he's doing for the right reasons, and consider the long-term costs as well as any short-term benefits. Actions you take today will have lifelong impacts, and often in unpredictable ways.

          Comment


          • #6
            I think you should stay in. The rewards that this life offers far outweigh those you could get anywhere else. Best of luck on coming to a sound decision, however.

            Comment


            • #7
              hey matt,

              sorry to hear you want to quit, but it's a great career, a great opportunity and a wonderful life style. the chance to do more and see more and to become something greater and be apart of something greater then yourself or anything that you could get in a civilian world. For some it's just not there cup of tea and others it's a whole new world full of great explorartion and dedication and commitment. Why do you want to quit anyways? you don't have to answer just curious to know why. A friend of mine had recently joined after a fairly long talk about why he didn't want to go in, mostly on his list of reasons was because of the girl he was seeing she swore she would never speak to him again if he enlisted, swore she would hate him forever. His mom was no better said he was just going to do this to get her mad and to hurt himself or worse, after a long talk he had with me and an even longer talk with the four of us (me, him, his g/f, and mother) not only did he end up enlisting but his g/f is now enlisting and his mother realized that no matter what he did she would be proud of him. You will always have people who are proud of you always have people who want whats best for you though also. I'm sure your reasons for whatever they are, are genuine and exactly what you want to do, but remember why you wanted to enlist in the first place? remember what it was about the guard that made you realize that you wanted to help and serve your country. that right there is something to be proud of, and all those around you should also be proud of you for wanting to join. the most important thing you should remember is that alot of people will sometimes tell you that you can't do something or that you shouldn't do something but in the end it's up to you to prove them wrong. Think carefully of what your planning on doing before you do it, fear is ok when your going into something you have no knowledge about, but don't let it control your thoughts and actions. You should try it out and see how you like it but if you truely don't want to then call your recruiter and see what he can do for you, i'm sure he'll help you get out if you truely don't want to be in any longer. best of luck to you, for me the civilian world is not all it's cracked up to be, but maybe for you it will be better. good luck.

              -Gio (Vickie)

              Comment


              • #8
                I am 100% sure I signed my life away...I mean the contract. I signed a contract of 6x2 years ARNG.

                The real reason why I don't want to go is a pretty lame excuse.

                I'll be honest, I'm a weak body. I don't have endurance and I'm supposed to make the mile run in 8:30 seconds flat. I hate running. I absolutely hate it. So my thinking is if I can't run (which I'll do plenty in Basic) why not just get out, if I can. I can't even do a push up :o

                I'm not fat or overweight, I just haven't exercised in a long time.

                I just don't want to go to Military jail or anything. I'd rather be in the Military than be in jail. I still have to go to drill one weekend a month for about 5 months before I ship out in March.

                One of the reasons why I joined was not for college or to get away, but to meet new friends, really. I really don't mind going to Iraq or Afghanistan, in fact I told my recruiter that I would volunteer to go if a unit was going.

                I'm not really a patriot and I'm not one of those guys who has American flags all over his car and house. I just wanted to make some friends and have better discipline in my life.

                Matt

                Comment


                • #9
                  [QUOTE=Matt]I am 100% sure I signed my life away...I mean the contract. I signed a contract of 6x2 years ARNG.

                  The real reason why I don't want to go is a pretty lame excuse.

                  I'll be honest, I'm a weak body. I don't have endurance and I'm supposed to make the mile run in 8:30 seconds flat. I hate running. I absolutely hate it. So my thinking is if I can't run (which I'll do plenty in Basic) why not just get out, if I can. I can't even do a push up :o

                  I'm not fat or overweight, I just haven't exercised in a long time.

                  I just don't want to go to Military jail or anything. I'd rather be in the Military than be in jail. I still have to go to drill one weekend a month for about 5 months before I ship out in March.

                  One of the reasons why I joined was not for college or to get away, but to meet new friends, really. I really don't mind going to Iraq or Afghanistan, in fact I told my recruiter that I would volunteer to go if a unit was going.

                  I'm not really a patriot and I'm not one of those guys who has American flags all over his car and house. I just wanted to make some friends and have better discipline in my life.

                  Matt[/QUOTE]

                  Matt, I think it's sad to hear you say the things you did - not about you wanting to go to Iraq, or how you wouldn't consider yourself a Patriot, but the fact that you'd give up a chance for what you wanted just because you are a "weak body". Would you really want to tell anyone that the reason you quit something; whether it be the military, studying for a test, or trying for a new job promotion? Don't give up! If you are worried about your PT tests, RSP offers Fitness Training, you just have to ask for it. I know a few people who have gone through basic training - and trust me - they don't look like the most able bodied people either. But they made it.

                  99% of people will tell you that Basic training (and the military in general) is all MENTAL. There was a girl in my RSP who continuously got the award for most motivated recruit every Sunday after RSP was over. She was one of the slowest and least physically fit of all the recruits. BUT, she was MOTIVATED, and she YELLED her heart out, and she put her mind to the game. That's all it's about.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=Matt]I swore in. I was escorted to a little red room with flags and had a sergeant read me the "Oath of Enlistment"...(to defend the Constitution). I raised my right hand and swore I would serve. After that I signed more paperwork. Then I flew home.[/QUOTE]


                    It's going to be an up-hill battle my friend. Did you not realize your self descibed short-comings before you signed up? Did you not understand that you were signing a legally binding contract to serve your nation?

                    Whatever the case, going through with your obligation will nothing but benefit your future and your self esteem. Don't let fear of the unknown prevent you from doing the best thing that you could do for yourself.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Think long and hard. The decision to get out needs to be made before you ship out. Because if you get there and decide then...the army WILL humiliate you. You'll goto a unit with a bunch of guys just like that, and you'll probably do random duties and details for a long time before you ever go home. They will literally get some of their $40k back out of you one way or another.

                      Is it right? Is the American to put someone through that and do that? I don't know, but I am sure somewhere in that pile of papers you sign, they get the right to. Or else you risk even more poop on your records. But on the flipside, is it right to not fulfill your obligation you knew about before being sworn in?

                      Many soldiers will lay the guilt trip on you (which I don't believe is professional or right at all). I'm just giving you what you can expect and telling you its best to make your mind up now.

                      As for me, I joined with 2 friends. One had some kind of condition with his eye that was discovered and he never made it through MEPS. The other went through with me and then stopped going to drill (female whipped) before our ship dates and I'm sure the guard did their thing and discharged him. I didn't want to continue to the trend...and didnt want to face this for the rest of my life. BT had its tough points. I was a soda freak, didnt really eat healthy and never exercised a lot before going. Naturally tall and skinny though.

                      I've never been a runner. Anytime I failed the PT test, it was because of the run and anytime I passed it, it was just barely. I lost out on PLDC and CPL/SGT stripes many times because of it. It got worse post deployment, because I had a newborn, another on the way shortly after, school to finish and a career to start. So I got domesticated and lazy.

                      I can shoot pretty well, DnC better than most and earned a lot of trust from my NCOs and COs.

                      But physical quality alone does not make a soldier. Its very important and can stop you from promotion, but your buddies and the guard will always try to find ways to help you and for the most part, not treat you different as a person because of it. Nobody punishes you. Its all part of that brotherhood you'll develope. Every soldier has his own strengths and weaknesses and everything can be improved upon one way or another.

                      You wont find better friends than in the military...especially in your immediate leadership...who will sacrifice a lot to see you happy...many times behind the scenes that you'll never know about. These are men that do their best to make sure you get home to your family safely....even at the cost of their life in the process sometimes.

                      Whether you want to serve alongside us or support behind us...its your choice. Either way...the rest of us have our job to do and thats to defend your right for you to make your own destiny.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        [QUOTE=SteveLord]Think long and hard. The decision to get out needs to be made before you ship out. Because if you get there and decide then...the army WILL humiliate you. You'll goto a unit with a bunch of guys just like that, and you'll probably do random duties and details for a long time before you ever go home. They will literally get some of their $40k back out of you one way or another.

                        Is it right? Is the American to put someone through that and do that? I don't know, but I am sure somewhere in that pile of papers you sign, they get the right to. Or else you risk even more poop on your records. But on the flipside, is it right to not fulfill your obligation you knew about before being sworn in?

                        Many soldiers will lay the guilt trip on you (which I don't believe is professional or right at all). I'm just giving you what you can expect and telling you its best to make your mind up now.

                        As for me, I joined with 2 friends. One had some kind of condition with his eye that was discovered and he never made it through MEPS. The other went through with me and then stopped going to drill (female whipped) before our ship dates and I'm sure the guard did their thing and discharged him. I didn't want to continue to the trend...and didnt want to face this for the rest of my life. BT had its tough points. I was a soda freak, didnt really eat healthy and never exercised a lot before going. Naturally tall and skinny though.

                        I've never been a runner. Anytime I failed the PT test, it was because of the run and anytime I passed it, it was just barely. I lost out on PLDC and CPL/SGT stripes many times because of it. It got worse post deployment, because I had a newborn, another on the way shortly after, school to finish and a career to start. So I got domesticated and lazy.

                        I can shoot pretty well, DnC better than most and earned a lot of trust from my NCOs and COs.

                        But physical quality alone does not make a soldier. Its very important and can stop you from promotion, but your buddies and the guard will always try to find ways to help you and for the most part, not treat you different as a person because of it. Nobody punishes you. Its all part of that brotherhood you'll develope. Every soldier has his own strengths and weaknesses and everything can be improved upon one way or another.

                        You wont find better friends than in the military...especially in your immediate leadership...who will sacrifice a lot to see you happy...many times behind the scenes that you'll never know about. These are men that do their best to make sure you get home to your family safely....even at the cost of their life in the process sometimes.

                        Whether you want to serve alongside us or support behind us...its your choice. Either way...the rest of us have our job to do and thats to defend your right for you to make your own destiny.[/QUOTE]
                        _________________________________________________________________

                        Ok, Army it is then.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=Matt]

                          I'll be honest, I'm a weak body. I don't have endurance and I'm supposed to make the mile run in 8:30 seconds flat. I hate running. I absolutely hate it. So my thinking is if I can't run (which I'll do plenty in Basic) why not just get out, if I can. I can't even do a push up :o

                          I'm not fat or overweight, I just haven't exercised in a long time.

                          I just don't want to go to Military jail or anything. I'd rather be in the Military than be in jail. I still have to go to drill one weekend a month for about 5 months before I ship out in March.[/QUOTE]

                          brother if you have 5 months to train before you go to basic you will be fine... run with someone who will motivate you. train with someone you have respect for. my RSP unit offered extra PT during the week, and my recruiters were always willing to set up PT with me to help me out. i personally HATE running... but you have to force yourself to do it. mix it up, run outside, run on a tredmill, play basketball or soccer, get on a bike, swim laps. do anything to improve your cardio and your leg strength and your run time will improve. it may be a slow process, but it WILL improve. and if you get to basic and it's still not close to where it should be, they will make sure it comes down before graduation. they will PT you until it does (which i can only guess will be MUCH worse than you trying to PT yourself before you leave.)

                          this opportunity does not come along many times in someone's life. the military offers to many things to people who don't have much, and even to those who have a lot to give. i would hate to see you give it up and regret it later on in life when you have to put "discharged" on an application for a job.

                          think about it. if the PT is truly the only reason why you don't want to go, you can fix that. if it's fear, denial, a relationship you don't want to admit to, it all comes down to how important is this to you. fear is part of the process.

                          i hope you make the right decision for yourself. good luck.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Regarding the PT: Buckeye is right. In five months, believe me, if you push yourself, you will be amazed at the changes you can make- but you don't have to do it alone. Find someone to run with, ride your bike, anything- set yourself some goals, and DON'T BACK DOWN! However much you dread doing the P.T. in Basic right now...that's how proud you're gonna be when you graduate, knowing how hard you worked for it. One other thing I want to second that other people have said- To win it, you've gotta want it. It's all about motivation. Best of luck, whatever you choose!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If motivation is really what you need come on here and read what everyone has been writting. People who don't even know each other pulling togeather trying to motivate and ignite your passion to help to push you to succeed people from all walks of life all striving for one common goal looking to help each other out as best they can. Read what they are saying, hear it, acknowledge it, and breath it in and I will guarentee you will get motivated from at least some of it. Motivation is key to any type of physical fitness level you have to be able to motivate yourself and be around those who are willing to help motivate you. Everyone can say they can do it on there own and some can but sometimes you need an extra push. Keep your head up, your feet on the ground, and your heart with your goals. Buckeye is right opputunitys don't come around like often, the military offers a wide variety of ways to succeed and once you get in you'll realize just how many more your recruiters don't tell you about. and there will always be someone along the way who will need a little motivation including me and you just remember that your a team a family brothers and sisters fighting a common goal and impacting each others live's. my grandfather used to tell me all the time that the people he grew up with he remembers and is still aquianted with but the people he served with he will never forget and will always be his family. Goodluck to you and to everyone else.

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