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  • Military Police and Infantry Officer

    I was on a website, and I clicked on Military Police course and it said 15 weeks, but then when I went to

    https://atrrs.army.mil/atrrscc/course.aspx it has all these different courses

    1. which one would you go to after ROTC.
    2. Why the discrepencies? What are all these different courses?

    And for Infantry it said 14 weeks but then on https://atrrs.army.mil/atrrscc/course.aspx it has different ones as well...

    3. what is the difference between all the courses listed for Military Police and Infantry?

    Also on the website, it mentioned Mortar Leaders Course or Mechanized Leaders Course ...

    4. what determines which one you get and what is the difference? Is it an "option" like Airborne...Air Assault?

    ( The Army catalog atrrs didn't seem to mention any of them...I picked
    11A thats the officer MOS for Infantry right? So unless it is hidden)

    5. As an Infatry Officer do you have to go to Airborne/Air Assault/Pathfinder/Ranger or is it up to you?
    Looks good for promotions I guess?
    Last edited by SFC_Wilson; April 20th, 2011, 12:22 PM.

  • #2
    Re: Military Police and Infantry Officer

    WIth any new officer you will attend the Basic Course for you branch. I.E. Infantry Officer Basic Course (IOBC) or Military Police Officer Basic Course. All the other courses listed are for vaious career progression and alternate qualifications.

    You most likely will not attent Infantry Officer Mortar or Mechanized Courses unless you are assigned as a Platton Leader in a mortar platton or a mechanized platoon. Usually being assigned as a Mortar Platoon Leader is a second or third assignment, you usually will not see a 2LT there.

    Infantry Officers usually have access to all the high speed schools that you mentioned, and IOBC is designed to get you geared up to pass Ranger School, however your state will have to have funds authorized to send you.

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    • #3
      Re: Military Police and Infantry Officer

      Originally posted by SeanR87
      I was on a website, and I clicked on Military Police course and it said 15 weeks, but then when I went to

      https://atrrs.army.mil/atrrscc/course.aspx it has all these different courses

      1. which one would you go to after ROTC.
      2. Why the discrepencies? What are all these different courses?

      And for Infantry it said 14 weeks but then on https://atrrs.army.mil/atrrscc/course.aspx it has different ones as well...

      3. what is the difference between all the courses listed for Military Police and Infantry?

      Looks good for promotions I guess?
      A new 2LT will go to the same BOLC regardless of comssissioning source. MP BOLC is 17 weeks at beautiful Ft Leonard Wood. The course number is 7-19-C20B (I think).
      Last edited by SFC_Wilson; April 20th, 2011, 12:22 PM.

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      • #4
        Re: Military Police and Infantry Officer

        IOBC/IBOLC is 16 weeks. The discrepency in the dates may be due to the deletion of BOLC II. When there was BOLC II, IBOLC was shorter. Now that it is gone, then length went back to when it was before BOLC II was conceived of.

        The difference between Mortar Leader or Mechanized Leader depends on if you are going Regular Army or Guard, and whether you're going to a light unit or mechanized unit. In the Regular Army, if you go to a light infantry unit, you will go to Mortar leader. In the Guard, it depends on if your unit is willing to send you. In a NG mechanized unit, they may send you, or they may not place any importance on it. Same with Mortar leaders.

        In the Guard, it is also not necessarily true that a specialty (mortar, scout, weapons) platoon leader assignment is a follow on to a line platoon assignment.

        And in the Guard, those other schools are optional. Some units may require it but most don't. And even if you are willing to go to those schools, they may not be willing to send you.

        In the Regular Army, you will go to IBOLC, Airborne, Ranger, and either Mech leader or Mortar leader. Being a non-Ranger qualified Infantry officer in the Regular Army will guarantee a short Regular Army career.

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        • #5
          Re: Military Police and Infantry Officer

          So what is the difference between a Mechanized Infantry platoon, and a Mortar Infantry platoon?

          Different from a regular platoon or do they all have one element or the other? What exactly would they do. In the field, lets say.
          Last edited by SeanR87; August 22nd, 2010, 08:08 PM.

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          • #6
            Re: Military Police and Infantry Officer

            A mechanized infantry platoon is authorized 41 Soldiers. It has four Bradley Fighting Vehicles. Each BFV has a crew of three. The Platoon Sergeant and a Platoon Leader is a Bradley commander but both can dismount. The other crew members are stuck in the BFV. Then there are three dismount squads of nine. The BFV is not only their means of traveling to the objective but is their fire support, when squads are dismounted.

            A mortar platoon, whether heavy or light is made up of 24 Soldiers. In conventional warfare, they are responsible for providing indirect fire and do not maneuver.

            I don't know if you know but MA doesn't have heavy units so mechanized isn't an option for you. And none of your neighbors are mechanized.

            Light infantry is better anyway.

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