Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Guard vs Reserves for split op? Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Guard vs Reserves for split op?

    I am looking to join either the Army Reserves or the National Guard for the split op program. I am a junior in high school, and am 17 years old. I've been trying to do research on specific MOS's between each branch, but have only come up with a ton of old and out dated information. My top 3 MOS's are 1. Infantryman 2. Military Police 3. Field Artillery. Now, I know at least 1 and 3 are combat jobs, and I heard that the reserves are not offering any combat jobs? Can anyone shed some light on this? If I go Split ops in the army reserves, will that take away any possibility of a combat MOS? I know the Guard has many more MOS's, but I can't imagine having no Combat jobs available in the reserves. Another question I have is, can anyone tell me what an MP does in the National Guard? I've looked up some stuff and seen videos, and it seems like all they do is be policemen on their bases, and that is not what I want. I want to go out into the field, and arrest and apprehend insurgents and threats to our country, not sit on base and pull over people for speeding. Is the job description different for an MP from The reserves and the Guard? I have a meeting set up with a reserves recruiter next wednesday, but I'd like to have some of these questions answered beforehand. Any help on the questions I listed, the Guard, Reserves, or the Split Op program in general would be very much appreciated. Thanks!

  • #2
    Re: Guard vs Reserves for split op?

    Reserves = Combat Support MOSs & only Federal educational benefits
    Guard = Combat MOSs & State AND Federal educational benefits
    My experience with being an MP in general is you can be a base MP or a Field MP but I am not sure if you really have a choice in the matter.
    Last edited by robinpugs06; December 24th, 2011, 08:57 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Guard vs Reserves for split op?

      Originally posted by robinpugs06 View Post
      Reserves = Combat Support MOSs
      Guerds = Combat MOSs
      Incorrect. I joined the Army Reserves as a Combat Engineer.

      The MP unit will determine what is their primary mission which in the reserve components are mainly tactical.

      A recruiter can validate this but can 17 year olds enlist an MPs?
      Last edited by Chief Kemosabe; December 24th, 2011, 09:03 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Guard vs Reserves for split op?

        Military Police 31B General Info

        Training

        Job training for Military Police (MP) is 19 weeks, 1 day of One Station United Training (OSUT), which combines basic training and job training into one single course, at Fort Leonard Wood, MO.

        Civilian Related

        The skills you'll learn as part of the Military Police field will help prepare you for a future in law enforcement with federal, state, county or city agencies. Your training could also help you pursue a career as a detective, private investigator, undercover agent, correction officer or security officer with industrial firms, airports or other businesses and institutions.

        31B Military Police

        Even within the National Guard, crimes and accidents happen. Fortunately, the Guard has their own law enforcement, security and emergency specialists to handle crimes committed on Army or Guard property or any illegal activity that involves Guard personnel. On base, Military Police patrol, control traffic, secure the perimeter, and assist with emergencies and investigations. On the battlefield, they conduct area security, guard senior officers, and work with intelligence personnel in dealing with prisoners of war. MP’s are also in charge of training military working dogs.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Guard vs Reserves for split op?

          Originally posted by fmcityslicker View Post
          Incorrect. I joined the Army Reserves as a Combat Engineer.

          The MP unit will determine what is their primary mission which in the reserve components are mainly tactical.
          I am not incorrect - taken directly from The National Guard website;
          "National Guard vs Reserve
          Combat Arms
          The Army National Guard consists of 28 fully capable brigade combat teams with combat support and combat service support components. The Army Reserve is solely Combat Service Support and Combat Support."

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Guard vs Reserves for split op?

            Originally posted by fmcityslicker View Post
            Incorrect. I joined the Army Reserves as a Combat Engineer.

            The MP unit will determine what is their primary mission which in the reserve components are mainly tactical.

            A recruiter can validate this but can 17 year olds enlist an MPs?
            there may be some Combat Reserve Units left but not many. I just had this conversation with a National Guard as well as Reserves recruiter.
            I enlisted as an MP at 18 not sure about 17 though?

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Guard vs Reserves for split op?

              Originally posted by fmcityslicker View Post
              Incorrect. I joined the Army Reserves as a Combat Engineer.

              The MP unit will determine what is their primary mission which in the reserve components are mainly tactical.

              A recruiter can validate this but can 17 year olds enlist an MPs?
              What is kind of amusing is on the GoArmy website. Combat Engineer is not listed under the Combat MOSs. Odd

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Guard vs Reserves for split op?

                Originally posted by robinpugs06 View Post
                there may be some Combat Reserve Units left but not many. I just had this conversation with a National Guard as well as Reserves recruiter.
                I enlisted as an MP at 18 not sure about 17 though?
                I was just showing that your statement is not valid by my experience. Also, I googled and you have to be 18.

                http://answers.yahoo.com/question/in...9041616AAxOAYF

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Guard vs Reserves for split op?

                  Originally posted by fmcityslicker View Post
                  I was just showing that your statement is not valid by my experience. Also, I googled and you have to be 18.

                  http://answers.yahoo.com/question/in...9041616AAxOAYF
                  I know what you are saying and I wasn't trying to offend you in any way. I am just letting the OP know the differences and if you look them up or talk to recruiters that is what they will tell you - combat vs combat support jobs.
                  When did you join?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Guard vs Reserves for split op?

                    Four times over a 29 year period. The Army Reserve unit I joined in 83 still exists.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Guard vs Reserves for split op?

                      Originally posted by fmcityslicker View Post
                      Four times over a 29 year period. The Army Reserve unit I joined in 83 still exists.
                      That is really awesome. I know there are exceptions to the rule but I meant as a general rule!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Guard vs Reserves for split op?

                        For your information; combat arms; combat support and service support are terms that are no longer relevant in today's doctrine. I am not disputing about the type of units that Guard provides compared to the Reserves but you have to realize that support units may contain slots that are in "combat arms" MOS.

                        For example; I knew an MP that served in a medical unit because on that unit's MTOE was a slot for an E-7 31B.

                        My suggestion is for the OP to talk to both recruiters and check on MOS availability that is closest to him. Why travel 50 miles to go to an NG combat engineer line unit where there might be a Reserve unit that has a 10 level 12B slot that is 10 minutes from your house.

                        Perhaps distance is not a factor to those that serve in the reserve components but when I was a 17 year old without a car; that sure made a difference for me.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Guard vs Reserves for split op?

                          Originally posted by robinpugs06 View Post
                          That is really awesome. I know there are exceptions to the rule but I meant as a general rule!
                          of course its awesome haha

                          For your information; combat arms; combat support and service support are terms that are no longer relevant in today's doctrine. I am not disputing about the type of units that Guard provides compared to the Reserves but you have to realize that support units may contain slots that are in "combat arms" MOS.

                          For example; I knew an MP that served in a medical unit because on that unit's MTOE was a slot for an E-7 31B and an 11B in an sustainment unit.

                          My suggestion is for the OP to talk to both recruiters and check on MOS availability that is closest to him. Why travel 50 miles to go to an NG combat engineer line unit where there might be a Reserve unit that has a 10 level 12B slot that is 10 minutes from your house.

                          Perhaps distance is not a factor to those that serve in the reserve components but when I was a 17 year old without a car; that sure made a difference for me.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Guard vs Reserves for split op?

                            Originally posted by fmcityslicker View Post
                            of course its awesome haha

                            For your information; combat arms; combat support and service support are terms that are no longer relevant in today's doctrine. I am not disputing about the type of units that Guard provides compared to the Reserves but you have to realize that support units may contain slots that are in "combat arms" MOS.

                            For example; I knew an MP that served in a medical unit because on that unit's MTOE was a slot for an E-7 31B and an 11B in an sustainment unit.

                            My suggestion is for the OP to talk to both recruiters and check on MOS availability that is closest to him. Why travel 50 miles to go to an NG combat engineer line unit where there might be a Reserve unit that has a 10 level 12B slot that is 10 minutes from your house.

                            Perhaps distance is not a factor to those that serve in the reserve components but when I was a 17 year old without a car; that sure made a difference for me.
                            I couldn't agree with you more. I know quite a few soldiers in support positions that have seen a lot of direct combat. The terms are definitely out dated - I agree.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Guard vs Reserves for split op?

                              Originally posted by fmcityslicker View Post
                              For your information; combat arms; combat support and service support are terms that are no longer relevant in today's doctrine. I am not disputing about the type of units that Guard provides compared to the Reserves but you have to realize that support units may contain slots that are in "combat arms" MOS.

                              For example; I knew an MP that served in a medical unit because on that unit's MTOE was a slot for an E-7 31B.

                              My suggestion is for the OP to talk to both recruiters and check on MOS availability that is closest to him. Why travel 50 miles to go to an NG combat engineer line unit where there might be a Reserve unit that has a 10 level 12B slot that is 10 minutes from your house.

                              Perhaps distance is not a factor to those that serve in the reserve components but when I was a 17 year old without a car; that sure made a difference for me.
                              This would be a great example if 31B was a combat arms mos. Military Police are Combat Support. Generally speaking (yes I said it) there are no combat arms positions in the Army Reserves. They are few and far between..some exist but dont count on finding many 10 level 12B jobs. Most of the ones that remain are in training enviroments, hence thats quasi combat support in my opinion. There are also some that hang out in construction Brigades. You will not find any in a manuever unit.


                              From Wikipedia:::
                              In 1980, the peacetime USAR chain of command was overlaid with a wartime trace. In an expansion of the roundout and affiliation programs begun ten years earlier, CAPSTONE purported to align every Army Reserve unit with the active and reserve component units with which they were anticipated to deploy.[6] Units maintained lines of communication with the units—often hundreds or thousands of miles away in peacetime—who would presumably serve above or below them in the event of mobilization. This communication, in some cases, extended to coordinated annual training opportunities.

                              Despite the commonly held belief that CAPSTONE traces were set in stone, the process of selecting units to mobilize and deploy in 1990 and 1991 in support of Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm largely ignored CAPSTONE.

                              In the post-Cold War draw-down, all of the Army Reserve's combat units were disbanded, except the 100th Battalion, 442nd Infantry Regiment. This meant the disestablishment of the three remaining Army Reserve fighting brigades: the 157th Infantry Brigade (Mechanized) (Separate) of Pennsylvania, the 187th Infantry Brigade (Separate) of Massachusetts, and the 205th Infantry Brigade (Separate) (Light) of Minnesota. Many of the Army Reserve training divisions were realigned as institutional training divisions.

                              With the Army National Guard providing reserve component combat formations and related combat support units, the Army Reserve is configured to provide combat support, combat service support, peacekeeping, nation-building and civil support capability. With roughly twenty percent of the Army's organized units and 5.3 percent of the Army's budget, the Army Reserve provides about half of the Army's combat support and a quarter of the Army's mobilization base expansion capability.


                              Special warfare combatant-craft crewmen attach a naval special warfare 11-meter rigid-hull inflatable boat to an Army Reserve CH-47 Chinook helicopter.In 2008, the Army Reserve contains the following percentages of the Army's units of each category:

                              100% of chemical brigades, internment brigades, judge advocate units, medical groups, railway units, training & exercise divisions, and water supply battalions.
                              more than 67% of civil affairs units, psychological operations units, transportation groups, motor battalions, chemical battalions, hospitals, medical brigades, and theater signal commands.
                              nearly 50% of petroleum battalions, Adjutant General units, petroleum groups, transportation commands, terminal battalions, and public affairs units.
                              In fiscal years 2007–2009, the Army Reserve was realigned into a functional command structure. The majority of Army Reserve units are now assigned to operational and functional commands. Operational commands are deployable elements which command deployable units of the same or similar capabilities regardless of peacetime geographic location. For instance, the 377th Sustainment Command (Theater) commands all Army Reserve sustainment units, while the 11th Aviation Command commands all Army Reserve aviation assets. Likewise, functional commands are responsible for command of units of the same or similar capabilities regardless of peacetime geographic location, but are not, as a headquarters, deployable.

                              The training structure has been transformed in order to streamline command and control. Instead of multiple training divisions, each with its own geographic area of responsibility, the new structure features four training commands responsible for specific categories of training throughout the United States. Each command is configured for either initial entry training, advanced individual training schools, leader development or battle command training. These commands train soldiers of the Army Reserve, Army National Guard and the active component, through formal classroom and “hands on” training. Two training support commands under the First United States Army, designated First Army East and First Army West, provide customized, realistic unit-specific and operation-specific training. TSCs plan, conduct and evaluate training exercises for Army, Army Reserve and Army National Guard units. Training Support Commands are organized under the United States First Army into two subordinate units.

                              As a part of this realignment, most of the regional readiness commands were eliminated, leaving only seven globally. These were redesignated "[regional, civil or mission] support commands"; the four in the Continental United States being "regional"; the geography for which each regional support command increased significantly, but all of the support commands were stripped of their former command and control authority over units in their respective territories. Instead, the support commands provide base operations and administrative support to Army Reserve units within their geographic region.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X