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  • Marines view of the Guard

    I joined the National Guard a few weeks ago and I am about to do my first drill weekend. I'm prior service Marine Corps. I was a squared away Marine (made SSgt in 6 1/2 years) but got out because I was tired of the endless BS games that the Marine Corps is infamous for. Anyway, I'm a little nervous about my first drill and being behind the learning curve when it comes to knowing the Army way of doing things. I was just looking to hear from other prior Marines who are in the Guard now. How was your experience changing over to the Guard? Do you have any advice for making my transition a little smoother? Thanks!

  • #2
    Re: Marines view of the Guard

    It took a little getting used to, just be your oorah self, and you'll be fine. The main thing I realized, I had a distorted view of the Army coming from the Corps...and since being on this side, I have met some very squared away Soldiers, very impressive and hard core. Of course you have terds like anywhere else. Good luck, Marines do well in the Guard, there are many.

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    • #3
      Re: Marines view of the Guard

      Be open minded. Don't freak out if lower enlisted don't go to parade rest as soon as you make eye contact or something.

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      • #4
        Re: Marines view of the Guard

        Good question. I never thought to ask.

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        • #5
          Re: Marines view of the Guard

          Originally posted by AirCav View Post
          I joined the National Guard a few weeks ago and I am about to do my first drill weekend. I'm prior service Marine Corps. I was a squared away Marine (made SSgt in 6 1/2 years) but got out because I was tired of the endless BS games that the Marine Corps is infamous for. Anyway, I'm a little nervous about my first drill and being behind the learning curve when it comes to knowing the Army way of doing things. I was just looking to hear from other prior Marines who are in the Guard now. How was your experience changing over to the Guard? Do you have any advice for making my transition a little smoother? Thanks!
          Just remember that although it is the Army, you will be around alot of "civilian" minded people. There will be alot of "hey bob" and "yo tim" coming from E-4s mouths when they are talking to their NCO who has lived on the same street as them for 10 years. Like the other poster said, I don't think you will see ANYONE standing at parade rest. I'm in the Guard and I love it, I'm not bashing it but it will be the other side of the pendulum in comparison to active duty Marine Corps service.

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          • #6
            Re: Marines view of the Guard

            AirCav,

            For my experience 5 years ago, I was lucky enough to join the unit at the same time as two other former Marine NCOs. We sort of compared notes, tried to learn the jargon, and asked a LOT of questions of our squad leader and platoon sergeant. We got up to speed within about 3 drills and could anticipate things and events before they happened.

            Know this: things in the Army are as similar to the Marine Corps as they are different. Drill is different, virtually everyone is called "Sergeant", but you will come to love it.

            Also, avoid the pitfall of saying "well, when I was in the Marines...", or "we didn't do it that way in the Corps". Of course we didn't! It was the Corps!

            You'll do fine! Remember, cream rises to the top!!

            Semper Fi, Jarhead!
            Last edited by Wobbly Emu; March 12th, 2011, 12:09 AM. Reason: Typos

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            • #7
              Re: Marines view of the Guard

              Hey Marine, welcome to the Guard. Thank you for your continued service. I was a squid who crossed over long before the WTC thing. I just learned as I drilled.

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              • #8
                Re: Marines view of the Guard

                Originally posted by ParalegalNCO1 View Post
                Just remember that although it is the Army, you will be around alot of "civilian" minded people. There will be alot of "hey bob" and "yo tim" coming from E-4s mouths when they are talking to their NCO who has lived on the same street as them for 10 years. Like the other poster said, I don't think you will see ANYONE standing at parade rest. I'm in the Guard and I love it, I'm not bashing it but it will be the other side of the pendulum in comparison to active duty Marine Corps service.
                Honestly, the Regular Army is more geared at juniors being at parade rest than the Marine Corps is. But the Marines are tight about rank. Do not call a staff-sergeant a sergeant or a LTC a colonel.

                The Army is more **** about wearing all this gear outside the wire compared to the Corps too.

                Bottom line is that we are all warriors; we just wear different uniforms.

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                • #9
                  Re: Marines view of the Guard

                  Situps are not crunches. I could bang out 100 crunches in the first minute literally without breaking a sweat. Having to go all the way up and actually do full situps, that was an eye-opener. You'll adapt very quickly to it, though, but you need to practice first to get a feel for how high up you need to go and whatnot. The biggest issue for me was the different terminology. Fit Rep=NCOER. That was a big one that confused the heck out of me for awhile. If you ask where the head is you might get accused of sexual harassment. I still haven't quite figured out what to say instead of "attention on deck", so I just avoid standing near doorways where officers might walk in.

                  EDIT: One more thing. Learn some new cadences. While it is true that my Marine Corps came alive back in 1775, and first came the color blue to show the world that we are true, no one else in your new unit will be aware of this and they'll be greatly confused if you start yelling about it while on a run.
                  Last edited by 0844; March 12th, 2011, 05:39 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Marines view of the Guard

                    Originally posted by 0844 View Post
                    I still haven't quite figured out what to say instead of "attention on deck", so I just avoid standing near doorways where officers might walk in.
                    That usually only happens with higher ranked officers. Like Battalion CO and up. And it would just be "attention." No sea faring vessels to worry about.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Marines view of the Guard

                      Originally posted by ParalegalNCO1 View Post
                      Just remember that although it is the Army, you will be around alot of "civilian" minded people. There will be alot of "hey bob" and "yo tim" coming from E-4s mouths when they are talking to their NCO who has lived on the same street as them for 10 years. Like the other poster said, I don't think you will see ANYONE standing at parade rest. I'm in the Guard and I love it, I'm not bashing it but it will be the other side of the pendulum in comparison to active duty Marine Corps service.
                      Wow. I guess I've been fortunate to always train on or near a main post, because that wouldn't fly.

                      It depends what unit you are in, and what your next in command expects of you. Lower enlisted troops should always be at parade rest when speaking to a NCO outside of the field. NCOs should be at parade rest when speaking to 1SG. Imo anything less is jacked up and disrespectful.

                      Those I have seen coming from the Marines have only had trouble with d&c, abbreviations, and the shock that when we qualify brm the max range on a target is 300 meters, ha ha

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                      • #12
                        Re: Marines view of the Guard

                        Originally posted by ScoutzOut View Post
                        Those I have seen coming from the Marines have only had trouble with d&c
                        hahaha...yeah...for some reason they dont want to annunciate LEFT or RIGHT...or any other command for that matter. lol

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                        • #13
                          Re: Marines view of the Guard

                          I have just returned from my first RSP drill and, although I am not prior service, there was no 'hi bob'or 'hi sam' going on anywhere. Also, it is absolutely exptected (in my company) to not only address NCO's as Sgt (whether they were 'Staff' Sgts or 'First' Sgts) but when Master Sgt came in, he is addressed as such.

                          Even though it was my first drill, I learned quickly....(and when I say 'you will' I am referring to what were told and taught; I have no idea what YOUR drill experience will be like).

                          When an NCO enters, the first person to see him announces 'parade rest' and you SNAP up at parade rest until he says 'At Ease' or you will DROP! (Similar to when an officer enters with 'Attention')

                          Unless in an office and told to relax and speak informally, when addressing an NCO in the hallway or anywhere, you stand at parade rest.....or you will DROP!

                          You will line up for formation at attention and NOT MOVE...or you (and possibly everyone) will DROP! We had one guy that thought it would be bright to YAWN when Master Sgt was speaking....yup, DROP!!

                          My drills are not as hard core focused on PT (see VICEROYS threads on his experiences) but mine are extremely rigid and disciplined when it comes to protocol, d and c and regulations. i.e. DO NOT show up in my formation having missed a spot shaving or, for goodness sake, don't call an NCO 'sir'.....but I understand this is more a 'newbie' recruit mistake.

                          Regardless of what a particular your drill 'focuses' on, I find if I follow the Army reg's to the letter, so far I have had no problems. I just keep my mouth shut (unless sounding off), my ears open and my eyes forward!

                          Enjoy it! And thank you for your continued service.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Marines view of the Guard

                            You will come to understand that RSP drill is VASTLY different that than of most other drills in the guard, with the possible exception of a LRS unit or other combat arms units. RSP is regimented with the idea of preparing young soldiers for BCT/AIT, and how they should act after their BHO.

                            The reference to some units being "civilianized" comes from the fact that some soldiers have been drilling together in the same unit for many years, and may even work together on the outside.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Marines view of the Guard

                              Originally posted by Wobbly Emu View Post
                              You will come to understand that RSP drill is VASTLY different that than of most other drills in the guard, with the possible exception of a LRS unit or other combat arms units. RSP is regimented with the idea of preparing young soldiers for BCT/AIT, and how they should act after their BHO.

                              The reference to some units being "civilianized" comes from the fact that some soldiers have been drilling together in the same unit for many years, and may even work together on the outside.
                              +1.

                              I had a brief stint with a RAOC and it was very laxed with alot of people on a first name basis. I guess that can be pretty common in a support unit. In combat arms units it is a different story, customs and courtesies are stressed and enforced alot more.

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