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  • #16
    Re: IRR and retirement

    Originally posted by tenbenz View Post
    Mr. Incognito,

    Thank you for replying. Can you give me reasons for not wanting to do this in the IRR? I am currently rated 90% from the VA and I also have a 50-50 chance at being rated at 100 once my contentions are heard and I do currently qualify for CRSC. I am an E9 and have been in the Reserves 35 years, 7 of which is AD. I have 4 deployments. I have a P3 profile. I was originally going the MEB route, but was told that if I was medically discharged, my VA pay would more than likely be higher than my medical retirement pay and would be offset. So I figured why bother going through the year long process for essentially nothing. So I decided I could go in the IRR and still get points, still get the SGLI, and I could also keep my ID Card. Then I was advised that my med retirement would be augmented by CSRC and I stood a good chance of collecting something right away.

    Here's where the IRR makes sense to me. My job in the military requires a boat load of time. Other than the 12 weekends, I am expected to be on 3 phone conferences a month, I do 29 days of AT, and I do a bunch more stuff for the flag. I also have to travel quite frequently. The Reserve commitment has also had a negative impact on my civilian career. I can not expend the energy to complete my job the way I, and my Soldiers, expect me too. My performance has suffered over the last two years because my heart is just not in it anymore. Right now I am just occupying space and denying a deserving Soldier who wants my job and a chance to excel. So I ask, what is the pro of staying and what is the con of going into the IRR.

    If it is true that I can't go in the IRR once the process starts, then what does the Army do with me? Right now, other than assigning me a P3 profile, the MEB has not officially started. If I go in the IRR before anything has begun, would the Army still move forward with the MEB?

    Thank you
    First, at a minimum, you qualify for CRDP (which would take effect at age 60), however if you do in fact qualify for CSRC, that takes effect as soon as you start drawing retired pay (and have made the subsequent application).

    Officially, once something happens that triggers a MEB (issuance of a P3 for a condition not meeting retention standards). Personal type transactions, like getting out and retiring are stopped. Thats not to say it has never happened before. Once the MEB is triggered, the offical answer is the only way out is if you complete the MEB or have your profile downgraded (which can be tough).

    The most important thing for you is to understand that the MEB can and will in your circumstance give you more, whether is be CRDP or CRSC...assuming you have enough conditions that dont meet retention standards to get your army ratings high enough. Your army rating and va rating, while can sometimes be the same number, are two ratings that mean different things).

    You will get a new VA rating at the end of the MEB/PEB process. So if you are currently spinning your wheels to try and get from 90 to 100, it will be a moot argument. Any paperwork pending in the VA ratings system will be put on hold once you are in the IDES process (Integrated Disability Evaluation System, it combines the VA disability and Army disability process into one).

    Even if you could sneak into the IRR, it complicates things. Mainly, I would tell people you cannot continue to receive a good year but in your case that isn't really an issue. The issue is the IRR is this grey area of I am in the military or am I not. The MEB/PEB process is one the armys most complicated events. Being in the IRR leaves you in this quasi "who do I belong to status". Who do I call when something in the process is dorked up? No one will take ownership of you. Even as a SGM/CSM in this process sometimes you need that.

    Take no ones advice about this process unless it comes from these people (especially your state or local command if USAR, their intent always is not in the soldiers best interest).

    www.jagcnet.army.mil/OSC

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: IRR and retirement

      Well, this certainly clears up a whole lot, but it opens the door for more questions.

      1) So I am "forced" to stay in. What are my options as far as a spot on the UMR? Can I be carried as a pending loss (preferable)? Do I still have to come to drill? As I said, I want to step aside and let someone do the job the way it should be done. I don't want to become Willie Mays and not be able to catch up to an 84 MPH fastball (which, sadly, I believe has already happened).

      2) You said the VA will give me a new rating. Does that mean my 90% may decrease? What is this new rating based on, an Army Dr.s opinion or will I be doing new C&Ps for everything already decided?

      Thank you for all the valuable information.

      P.S. For the record, I am not trying to get to 100%. I'm only trying to be rated fairly. I've already been deemed I/U, but because I still want to work, I'm not ready for that yet. My contentions are that the Dr didn't do a fair exam when measuring my back. She didn't take any measurements and did not have me bend but yet she put down that I did all the exercises and it came out at 10%. A previous exam had me at 20% for the back and 20% for the radiculopathy which is more in line with what I am. That's just to name 1 of 4 contentions.

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: IRR and retirement

        This is an excellent paper on military retirement. I urge career Soldiers to download it and read.

        http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.c...act_id=1961323

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: IRR and retirement

          1) So I am "forced" to stay in. What are my options as far as a spot on the UMR? Can I be carried as a pending loss (preferable)? Do I still have to come to drill? As I said, I want to step aside and let someone do the job the way it should be done. I don't want to become Willie Mays and not be able to catch up to an 84 MPH fastball (which, sadly, I believe has already happened).
          With out knowing more where you're at in the process, you probably couldn't be carried as a pending loss. You would still have to attend drill. Why risk everything over not showing up.

          If you're really concernced about this, talk to your CoC and 1SG/CSM. They maybe able to double slot you/"hide" you in the UMR so someone else takes your slot with out it huring the unit.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: IRR and retirement

            Originally posted by Mr.Incognito View Post
            Answer these questions first.

            Are you in an MEB?

            Do You have a P3 profile?

            Were you offered early retirement at 15 years?!!!!!
            Mr. Incognito,

            Sir, I have a question similar to the previous person. I have a P3 profile and I just got orders to go IRR that was effective July 3rd, 2013. I had knee surgery from the Army in 2009. The Army doctor had asked me if I wanted to be medically discharged and I declined because I was very patriotic at that time. Now that my knees are deteriorating, I am looking towards the future and wanted to know what my best option was. I am currently rated at 50% with the VA. I also filed a claim for Sleep Apnea which I was just recently diagnosed earlier this year. How do I start a MEB from the IRR and would it benefit me in the long run? I am more concerned about keeping the medical insurance more than anything. Please help and thank you.

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: IRR and retirement

              Originally posted by JV_LEO View Post
              Mr. Incognito,

              Sir, I have a question similar to the previous person. I have a P3 profile and I just got orders to go IRR that was effective July 3rd, 2013. I had knee surgery from the Army in 2009. The Army doctor had asked me if I wanted to be medically discharged and I declined because I was very patriotic at that time. Now that my knees are deteriorating, I am looking towards the future and wanted to know what my best option was. I am currently rated at 50% with the VA. I also filed a claim for Sleep Apnea which I was just recently diagnosed earlier this year. How do I start a MEB from the IRR and would it benefit me in the long run? I am more concerned about keeping the medical insurance more than anything. Please help and thank you.
              Mr Incognito is no longer on these forums (Banned)

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: IRR and retirement

                Can you see that Mr. Incognito has been banned from the site? If you are a combat veteran or not, you can go to the American Legion or VFW and there are reps that can help you out. They have given me some awesome advice.

                http://www.vfw.org/Assistance/Transitioning/

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: IRR and retirement

                  Originally posted by JV_LEO View Post
                  Mr. Incognito,

                  Sir, I have a question similar to the previous person. I have a P3 profile and I just got orders to go IRR that was effective July 3rd, 2013. I had knee surgery from the Army in 2009. The Army doctor had asked me if I wanted to be medically discharged and I declined because I was very patriotic at that time. Now that my knees are deteriorating, I am looking towards the future and wanted to know what my best option was. I am currently rated at 50% with the VA. I also filed a claim for Sleep Apnea which I was just recently diagnosed earlier this year. How do I start a MEB from the IRR and would it benefit me in the long run? I am more concerned about keeping the medical insurance more than anything. Please help and thank you.
                  First, doctors don't medically discharge people and MEBs are not an option if you are issued a P3 profile for a unqualifying condition. Second, just because you enter an MEB doesn't mean you will be discharged...you can be found fit and/or ask for exceptions (programs called COAD and COAR) Third, if you were supposed to go through an MEB and have have a P3 profile I am confused about how you were discharge to go into the IRR, BUT if you were supposed to have an MEB it most likely can still happen, and there is a section of HRC that process orders returning to active duty to go through MEB/PEB (which isn't neccessarily required. MEBs can be done from the IRR but I always advise against it). You really need to call the OSC and talk about your options.

                  https://www.jagcnet.army.mil/OSC

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: IRR and retirement

                    Originally posted by Chief Kemosabe View Post
                    Can you see that Mr. Incognito has been banned from the site? If you are a combat veteran or not, you can go to the American Legion or VFW and there are reps that can help you out. They have given me some awesome advice.

                    vfw.org/Assistance/Transitioning/
                    These people wouldn't have the slightest clue on even how to spell MEB. Call no one other than the office of the soliders counsel. And of course I just typed a long response to his question and it needs to be moderated.OSC.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: IRR and retirement

                      Originally posted by realitycheck View Post
                      These people wouldn't have the slightest clue on even how to spell MEB. Call no one other than the office of the soliders counsel. And of course I just typed a long response to his question and it needs to be moderated.OSC.
                      The VA service rep at my VFW was a CSM that personally went through the process himself and received the ratings that he was seeking. Granted with everything in life, you will have your limited knowledge ones but I have come across some real knowledgeable ones.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: IRR and retirement

                        Originally posted by Chief Kemosabe View Post
                        The VA service rep at my VFW was a CSM that personally went through the process himself and received the ratings that he was seeking. Granted with everything in life, you will have your limited knowledge ones but I have come across some real knowledgeable ones.
                        Its probably the most complicated area of law the army has to offer, moreover they now run the system through the Integrated Disability Evaluation System. (IDES) VA reps know about VA ratings and VA disability....going through IDES and an ARMY MEB they do not. They are two different but systematically related animals.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: IRR and retirement

                          Is there such a thing as 15 Year retirement?, I have 15 Active Duty years already, someone please let me know...

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: IRR and retirement

                            Originally posted by Warrior62 View Post
                            Is there such a thing as 15 Year retirement?, I have 15 Active Duty years already, someone please let me know...
                            Are you still active duty?

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: IRR and retirement

                              It is under TERA (Temporary Early Retirement Authority) and that is if you are being passed over on promotion (involuntary separated). It is not for someone who voluntary left the service after 15 years or someone who is in the Guard/RA and has not completed 20 years of service but has over 15 active (super-rare).

                              http://myarmybenefits.us.army.mil/Ho....html?serv=147

                              Temporary Early Retirement Authority (TERA)

                              Regular Army: Active Duty

                              Benefit Fact Sheet

                              Summary:

                              The FY 2012 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), Public Law 112-81, enacted 31 December 2011, authorized the military services to offer early retirement to Soldiers who have completed at least 15 years of active service. This is a discretionary authority and not an entitlement. The Army has elected to use this limited program as part of a comprehensive force management strategy to shape the force. It does not apply to Soldiers of the Army National Guard or the U.S. Army Reserve.
                              Eligibility:

                              Early retirement under TERA is limited to active duty Regular Army Soldiers who are denied continued active duty service with an established involuntary separation date of 30 September 2018 or earlier who meet the following criteria:
                              a. Noncommissioned Officers (NCOs) denied continued service as a result of an approved Qualitative Service Program (QSP) centralized selection board who are serving on active duty and have completed 15 but less than 20 years of active service as of the established involuntary separation date.
                              b. Officers/Warrant Officers who have twice failed selection for promotion to the next grade, including those who have been selected for, but not yet accepted, selective continuation, who are serving on active duty and have 15 but less than 20 years of active service as of their established involuntary separation date.
                              c. All Soldiers must meet all eligibility requirements for retirement for length of service for a 20-year retirement, except as provided for under the TERA program. Exceptions to other eligibility requirements are not considered. In all cases, early retirement will not occur prior to attainment of 15 years of service on the established separation date.
                              This early retirement benefit will not be extended to Soldiers who:
                              a. Were previously separated under Voluntary Separation Incentive (VSI), Special Separation Benefit (SSB), or Voluntary Separation Pay (VSP) programs.
                              b. Are under evaluation for disability retirement under Title 10, Chapter 61.
                              c. Are members of the Army National Guard or U.S. Army Reserves.
                              Benefit Highlights:

                              TERA retired pay is generally calculated using the same formula that is used for 20-or-more-year retirements, but it includes an early retirement reduction factor. The calculation is 2.5 percent of the average of the highest 36 months of base pay times the number of years of service, times the TERA reduction factor. Reduction factors are based upon the number of months that retirement is taken before the 20-year minimum (1/12th of 1% for each month of early retirement).
                              Last edited by Chief Kemosabe; August 29th, 2013, 03:55 PM.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: IRR and retirement

                                There is a type of 15 year retirement for the Guard Reserve. It is only used if you have a unfitting medical condition that warrants seperation and it was NOT in the line of duty.

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