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  • Rotc while obtaining a M.S.

    Hi, I'm 22, married and have two children

    This is my situation,
    1) I have one more year left to get a B.A. in criminal justice with a minor in Business Admin.
    2) Taking care of my family is #1
    3) Making myself a better person and obtaining as much education as I can are important.
    4) I'm going to be applying for graduate school so I can obtain a M.S. in criminology with a college that has the Army Rotc program in the fall of 2013.

    I have been researching the different options but am unsure of what route to take. If I am able to get a 2 yr scholarship from the Rotc program, do I have to go active duty? I am basically inquiring about the financial support that the Guard can help with. My main goal is to get into the National Guard so I can help out the community while working a full time job in the criminal justice field.

    Thank you for the future responses.

  • #2
    Re: Rotc while obtaining a M.S.

    If you do not go into a program with BCT under your belt, you would not qualify to come in as an MSIII and be commissioned in 2 years. You have to have MSI - MSIV to commission OR BCT and MSIII-MSIV.

    That being said, there are 2 types of scholarships (generally). The standard ROTC scholarship is what all cadets a compete for. By taking this path, you are compared against your peers on the annual Order of Merit list and, based on your performance, can be assessed into AD, NG or USAR. The second scholarship is the GRFD - Guaranteed Reserve Forces Duty. With this one, you are automatically slotted into either the NG or USAR. You will not be able to compete for AD. You are not put against your peers on the OML and you are on your own to find a slot and branch.

    Not judging you at all, but based on your post, it seems that you are more interested in you civilian career and family than serving in the Army NG. Both are very important and to be commended, however, in the NG, being an officer is not a 1 weekend a month, 2 weeks a year gig. You will spend a considerable amount of time during the month on officer duties. To succeed, you have to put in the time and the dedication. Most decent ROTC units are going to instill that thought process into its cadets early on. Those who do not demonstrate that are cut early on...

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    • #3
      Re: Rotc while obtaining a M.S.

      Originally posted by jmclaughlin1701 View Post
      If you do not go into a program with BCT under your belt, you would not qualify to come in as an MSIII and be commissioned in 2 years. You have to have MSI - MSIV to commission OR BCT and MSIII-MSIV.

      That being said, there are 2 types of scholarships (generally). The standard ROTC scholarship is what all cadets a compete for. By taking this path, you are compared against your peers on the annual Order of Merit list and, based on your performance, can be assessed into AD, NG or USAR. The second scholarship is the GRFD - Guaranteed Reserve Forces Duty. With this one, you are automatically slotted into either the NG or USAR. You will not be able to compete for AD. You are not put against your peers on the OML and you are on your own to find a slot and branch.

      Not judging you at all, but based on your post, it seems that you are more interested in you civilian career and family than serving in the Army NG. Both are very important and to be commended, however, in the NG, being an officer is not a 1 weekend a month, 2 weeks a year gig. You will spend a considerable amount of time during the month on officer duties. To succeed, you have to put in the time and the dedication. Most decent ROTC units are going to instill that thought process into its cadets early on. Those who do not demonstrate that are cut early on...

      Thank you for responding.

      On the Guard site for Rotc,
      "If you have not taken the Basic Course but wish to pursue your commission through ROTC—and have at least two years of college remaining (undergraduate or graduate)—you can attend the Leader's Training Course (LTC)."

      Would this make up for the first two years and I be able to do the Advance part, which is two years, in the time that I take the graduate classes?

      I think I should have wrote my #2 a different way. What I meant was that taking care of them(trying to supply necessities in the recession) is my top priority as the head of my house. Also, I have been unemployed for a little while and have been just attending school while searching for work. Our unemployment rate as of March 2012 is at 19.5%.

      Again thank you for the response

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