Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

31 Bravo Career Opportunities

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 31 Bravo Career Opportunities

    I'm heading to MEPS this Wednesday and I plan on enlisting as a 31 Bravo.. Outside of possible Civilian Law Enforcement opportunities(I plan on getting at least an associates in Criminal Justice upon completion of OSUT) what kind of career opportunities for military police are there INSIDE the guard? Could I switch to active duty eventually if I please? How much room for advancement is there? Are there full time jobs available?

  • #2
    Being a MP will give you little to no edge about civilian law enforcement. MPs generally are poorly trained in law enforcement and most garrison LE is done by civilians, especially if you're in a GS company.

    It's not a bad MOS, just keep it in perspective.

    Comment


    • #3
      Austin,

      As a former MP that has served as a Federal Border Patrol agent; the MP school at Fort Leonard Wood has an above-par training course comparable to many law enforcement training agencies in the country. Granted, the MP school is two months and does not go heavily into statutory law but you receive a decent overview; especially for a career field that by doctrine supports five missions and you receive MP tactical training that is unparalleled from other police training. Also, you get exposure to corrections as well.

      I served in Iraq as an MP and conducted law enforcement operations on-post/base. Unlike other law enforcement agencies, we have guard mount and refresher training prior to getting into our patrol vehicles. To state that Army MPs are poorly trained is ignorance at best. I cannot comment on National Guard MPs but if they have competent leaders who care and passionate about providing sound leadership and training to the men/women under their charge, then I would assume that is a unit that is capable of handling the MP mission.

      Border Patrol training is 4 months and the New York Police Department is 6 months. I do not know about those police academies that you pay into; like the ones in Florida but I would not base quality based on the course length. If you want to pursue it, I highly suggest that you do. Below are photos of me in training and I sure miss those times. I have served in numerous military jobs and will immediate tell you if any of the jobs I held were not worth it.

      Based on current and upcoming force reductions, transferring from the Guard to active will not be an easy thing to do. I transferred service and components several times but it was during a period when policy allowed it be an easier thing to do.

      Click this video ====>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qIR-DQvnrl0

      Last edited by Chief Kemosabe; February 16th, 2014, 09:07 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        To state that Army MPs are poorly trained is ignorance at best.
        Sadly, it is not. A rookie cop who has completed their academy and FTO time are better trained and more "street" experience then the average active duty MP. As a PL that was mob'd and did garrison LE for 18 months, 3 months in my Soldiers had more road exp then most mid grade NCOs by 6 months they made more road exp then senior NCOs found in the brigade. The line MP companies hated doing LE because they were so poorly trained and didn't have the exp. I've heard this from numerous other NG/USAR MP units that have done garrison LE on active posts. The loss of TDA MP units and 12+ years of war have really killed this skill set. I was at an AT one year and the NG MP unit didn't even have the basic gear to do LE. 17 weeks of training, half of which is just BCT and only very small fraction deals with law enforcement compared to any other police academy (which is why it is non transferable).

        Now that's not saying MPs don't have cool stuff. Mk-19s, 50 cals, ect, plus getting to do gunnery tables ect is pretty cool.

        Comment


        • Chief Kemosabe
          Chief Kemosabe commented
          Editing a comment
          I understand that your garrison PL time gave you that negative impression but to understand what the MP mission and the scope of support (e.g. in foreign countries, a huge base like Fort Hood), MPs are given sufficient training and tools to know the basics of the job. More often, as in all MOS, they will get their experience on the job.

      • #5
        I understand that MP training alone is not enough to be considered fit for civilian police work. However I would think that any military experience, coupled with a degree in Criminal Justice and a strong resume would put me above many other applicants with say one or neither of these under their belts. And although I haven't yet been to basic, I don't think it's fair to say that MPs are poorly trained. I'm sure their training is based on the needs of the army and the mission at hand, rather than preparing the soldiers for a career in civilian LE.

        Comment


        • #6
          Austin, join the NG because it's something you want to do, not because you think it's going to give you a leg up in a job.

          Comment


          • #7
            Originally posted by RedLeg View Post
            Austin, join the NG because it's something you want to do, not because you think it's going to give you a leg up in a job.
            Not sure why you assume that redleg, I'm joining the guard for many reasons. But as I'm sure you know, it's probably hard to live off a months drill pay, and i was just curious as to what job opportunities could come up while in/after the guard.

            Comment


            • #8
              What he is saying is simple, being a MP wont give you any more of a leg up than a cook when it comes to getting a job as a LEO. With that in mind consider other possible MOS' that might interest you more than being a MP on the weekends. NG MP's simply do not have the amount of training and experience as the active duty counterparts when it comes to enforcing laws and regulations on post and by nature they never will. I would also encourage you to consider a degree other than criminal justice and look at getting at least a bachelors. Diversify yourself.

              Comment

              Working...
              X