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  • #16
    Re: Career in the military

    Originally posted by matthew.ritchie View Post
    Second, if you don't have a good reason to go to college, then perhaps you shouldn't go right now. We have plenty of people with useless degrees and a mountain of debt, you don't want to be one of them.
    What degrees would you consider useFUL? I'm seeing more and more people with Bachelors and Masters unemployed or underemployed. I'm not sure that any degree is worth going into debt other than nursing.

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Career in the military

      Originally posted by CSM View Post
      What degrees would you consider useFUL? I'm seeing more and more people with Bachelors and Masters unemployed or underemployed. I'm not sure that any degree is worth going into debt other than nursing.
      Paralegal and jwarren will eventually chime in, but the general consensus is that the following degrees are worth pursuing because of the ability to be quickly employed after graduation (in no particular order):

      -Electrical engineering
      -Mechanical engineering
      -Chemical engineering
      -Computer science

      This is not an exclusive list by any means, but it is based on my experience that people who major in these fields tend to have very little difficulty finding employment.

      I am a Computer Science major from Rutgers University. Even those who were considered sub-par CS majors have found CS-related employment 2 months after graduation. They should not have because they sucked, but it goes to show you the demand for particular fields.

      There's definitely some correlation between the difficulty of the major and the low unemployment of the graduates of that field. Computer science at Rutgers University was and still is no easy walk in the park. Of the people who attempt the Intro 101 class, 45% will walk out of the class with an F on their transcript. Of the people who get through the 101 class and proceed onto the 102, 40% will walk out of the class with an F on their transcript, and so on. The last required class (Operating Systems) would have a fail rate of 35%.

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Career in the military

        Thanks for replying. I'm sure the math and science requirements eliminate a lot of people from pursuing engineering degrees. My ds got AS degrees in IT Security and Networking. Almost half the students didn't finish the Cisco related courses. Many of those who did finish barely passed. By the time he went through two years, he was burnt out and no longer interested in a computer related field. I guess even though the degree may end up be "useless" hopefully the education behind it may be beneficial--in some form or another. I'm speaking as the parent of a kid who probably has four useless degrees. :P

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        • #19
          Re: Career in the military

          Originally posted by CSM View Post
          What degrees would you consider useFUL? I'm seeing more and more people with Bachelors and Masters unemployed or underemployed. I'm not sure that any degree is worth going into debt other than nursing.
          The acronym that educators use is STEM: science, technology, engineering, and math. Nursing is a good gig, because you can work as much or as little as you want, and you can get a job in New York City or East Overshoe. Avoid any major with the word "studies" in it. Also avoid any degree when job goal for the majority of those students is to become a professor in that subject.

          Alternately, go the skilled labor route, and become an electrician, carpenter, auto mechanic, plumber, HVAC technician, etc. These jobs aren't glamorous, but you can train for them cheaply through the local community college, and start working at age 20 with no debt.

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          • #20
            Re: Career in the military

            Originally posted by CSM View Post
            I guess even though the degree may end up be "useless" hopefully the education behind it may be beneficial--in some form or another. I'm speaking as the parent of a kid who probably has four useless degrees. :P
            The education itself isn't a bad thing, although he may have dramatically overpaid for it.

            I personally have a useless degree, although I knew at the time that I was getting that degree for myself and not to get a job. I incurred no debt, studied for it while holding a job, and kept reality in focus.

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Career in the military

              Nursing worked for me. After a 10 year hiatus, I'm once again gainfully employed.

              In my son's case, only one degree was overpaid. The others were essentially free. Like you (on the overpaid degree), he wasn't taking the classes to get a job. Unlike you, he didn't have to work to pay for it. Still...he's very appreciative of everything we've done and is thankful for the military opportunities--especially after working in retail/fast food places.

              "STEM," one acronym that I'll actually be able to remember! Thanks.

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Career in the military

                Yeah, technology jobs are good when you are in the Guard. I applied for a job making $70/hr....unfortunately, my resume was not technical enough. Having a security clearance is good for getting many technology jobs.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Career in the military

                  Majoring in math or physics and minoring in finance or economics is also a good route. Although I think if you're going to spend four years studying for something you owe it to yourself to learn some at least some basic computer programming while you're at it. If you're at least somewhat competent in C++ or Java and have familiarity with SQL or Postgres you're in good shape.

                  With regard to engineering, Polo is mostly correct. However, ChemE tends to be more highly specialized than MechE or EE. If you're not sure that you want to design chemical plants/processes, I'd recommend a different engineering discipline. Electrical is probably the toughest, but it'll provide the most exposure to software development. If you choose electives wisely, you can come out of a EE program knowing almost as much about computer programming and architecture as a CS major but with a lot more mathematics knowledge.

                  Personally, I studied mechanical engineering, took the hardest electives, and learned programming on my own.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Career in the military

                    Originally posted by jwarren View Post
                    Although I think if you're going to spend four years studying for something you owe it to yourself to learn some at least some basic computer programming while you're at it. If you're at least somewhat competent in C++ or Java and have familiarity with SQL or Postgres you're in good shape.
                    Java and .NET are huge. My state is regularly hiring for application developers. Need 2 right now. Paying $63k and up + some of the best benefits one can get.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Career in the military

                      Originally posted by SteveLord View Post
                      Java and .NET are huge. My state is regularly hiring for application developers. Need 2 right now. Paying $63k and up + some of the best benefits one can get.
                      See? I wasn't lying!

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: Career in the military

                        I honestly think that my situation is one of the few times that a Liberal Studies degree is an okay decision. I have a LS degree that is composed of computer programming, a class in engineering, sociology, and computer networking classes all mashed together into the only degree they form. I opt'ed for the LS degree because it lessened the amount of time until i could get a degree and I already have a career and in my line any accredited degree will do, whether nuclear physics or a BS in napping.

                        I wanted the degree quicker so I could check the "i have a degree" box for my civilian and military positions, and it will help with the civilian promotion potential.

                        Unless you are in a situation similar to mine....get a BS in a STEM area. As a side note, my masters degree is at least an MS.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Career in the military

                          Originally posted by show_stopper999 View Post
                          I honestly think that my situation is one of the few times that a Liberal Studies degree is an okay decision. I have a LS degree that is composed of computer programming, a class in engineering, sociology, and computer networking classes all mashed together into the only degree they form. I opt'ed for the LS degree because it lessened the amount of time until i could get a degree and I already have a career and in my line any accredited degree will do, whether nuclear physics or a BS in napping.

                          I wanted the degree quicker so I could check the "i have a degree" box for my civilian and military positions, and it will help with the civilian promotion potential.

                          Unless you are in a situation similar to mine....get a BS in a STEM area. As a side note, my masters degree is at least an MS.
                          Thanks for sharing your experience. It sounds similar to my son. He really didn't know what he wanted to do per se so also ended up getting a LS degree while high school age. He took classes at local colleges as well as some online and transferred them to TESC. He had two years of computer classes, along with general eds, pych/soc, humanities. Then he wanted to get the college experience (dorm life, etc) and moved out at 17. Once he gets settled military-wise I imagine he'll eventually get his masters. By then he should be able to figure out which direction he wants to go and that's one degree we won't be paying for.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Career in the military

                            Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
                            No. The majority of officers are M-day, not AGR/miltech/ADOS.
                            I love ya polo, but I have to flick you on this one.

                            Do you think OP has even the slightest clue what that means?! Lol

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: Career in the military

                              Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
                              Paralegal and jwarren will eventually chime in, but the general consensus is that the following degrees are worth pursuing because of the ability to be quickly employed after graduation (in no particular order):

                              -Electrical engineering
                              -Mechanical engineering
                              -Chemical engineering
                              -Computer science

                              This is not an exclusive list by any means, but it is based on my experience that people who major in these fields tend to have very little difficulty finding employment.

                              I am a Computer Science major from Rutgers University. Even those who were considered sub-par CS majors have found CS-related employment 2 months after graduation. They should not have because they sucked, but it goes to show you the demand for particular fields.

                              There's definitely some correlation between the difficulty of the major and the low unemployment of the graduates of that field. Computer science at Rutgers University was and still is no easy walk in the park. Of the people who attempt the Intro 101 class, 45% will walk out of the class with an F on their transcript. Of the people who get through the 101 class and proceed onto the 102, 40% will walk out of the class with an F on their transcript, and so on. The last required class (Operating Systems) would have a fail rate of 35%.
                              Accounting wasn't mentioned, an that is usually guaranteed employment around 40-60K

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: Career in the military

                                Originally posted by show_stopper999 View Post
                                I honestly think that my situation is one of the few times that a Liberal Studies degree is an okay decision. I have a LS degree that is composed of computer programming, a class in engineering, sociology, and computer networking classes all mashed together into the only degree they form. I opt'ed for the LS degree because it lessened the amount of time until i could get a degree and I already have a career and in my line any accredited degree will do, whether nuclear physics or a BS in napping.

                                I wanted the degree quicker so I could check the "i have a degree" box for my civilian and military positions, and it will help with the civilian promotion potential.

                                Unless you are in a situation similar to mine....get a BS in a STEM area. As a side note, my masters degree is at least an MS.
                                Having that degree isn't a bad thing if its for the right reasons...but no one should get a degree in the arts and expect to be a hot commodity in any job market.

                                Comment

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