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  • #16
    Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

    Originally posted by ParalegalNCO1 View Post
    Majors like History, Criminal Justice, Womens Studies, and almost anything in the Arts is not helpful in gaining employment.
    Yup. Basically, if you are majoring in a soft science, you'd better have connections or realistic plans to attend graduate school.

    On what may sound like a spiteful note, this is why I LOL'd at all those USAF Majors who were dismissed recently. Many of these guys complained about going from a 100k/yr to 30k/yr salary. That means one of two things: either their skillsets were tailored exclusively for the military (stupid, stupid, stupid), or they were vastly overpaid for their level of education (pathetic, pathetic, pathetic). My personal opinion is that these guys were sitting there raking in the bucks figuring they just had to tread water for another 5 or 6 years before picking up some contractor or government job to add to their already hefty military pensions. Meanwhile, they didn't bother to keep themselves marketable outside the military, which is why some of them suffered a 70% drawdown in salary. They are reaping the fruits of their laziness, and it's their own **** fault.

    I'm not saying it doesn't **** to get laid off. But if you are living a 100k/yr lifestyle, you owe it to yourself and to your family to make sure that you are employable at that level in a general sense and not just within your current company/position. It is outrageous for these guys to get all mopey as if they somehow "deserve" their 100k/yr salaries any more than a civilian who got laid off from his 100k/yr job.

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    • #17
      Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

      Originally posted by jwarren View Post
      Yup. Basically, if you are majoring in a soft science, you'd better have connections or realistic plans to attend graduate school.

      On what may sound like a spiteful note, this is why I LOL'd at all those USAF Majors who were dismissed recently. Many of these guys complained about going from a 100k/yr to 30k/yr salary. That means one of two things: either their skillsets were tailored exclusively for the military (stupid, stupid, stupid), or they were vastly overpaid for their level of education (pathetic, pathetic, pathetic). My personal opinion is that these guys were sitting there raking in the bucks figuring they just had to tread water for another 5 or 6 years before picking up some contractor or government job to add to their already hefty military pensions. Meanwhile, they didn't bother to keep themselves marketable outside the military, which is why some of them suffered a 70% drawdown in salary. They are reaping the fruits of their laziness, and it's their own **** fault.

      I'm not saying it doesn't **** to get laid off. But if you are living a 100k/yr lifestyle, you owe it to yourself and to your family to make sure that you are employable at that level in a general sense and not just within your current company/position. It is outrageous for these guys to get all mopey as if they somehow "deserve" their 100k/yr salaries any more than a civilian who got laid off from his 100k/yr job.
      You must be referring to this: http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/20...awdown-071011/

      Then in mid-June, the Air Force did something that most officers today had never seen before — it kicked out 157 majors who had been passed over twice for promotion to lieutenant colonel. Most had 15 years in, or were close to it when the board convened; in better times, they would have been allowed to simply put in their 20.
      The sad fact is that, on average, an involuntarily separated USAF Major would fare better than an involuntarily separated Army Major based on the way most USAF commissioning sources select their cadets versus how the Army commissions its officers. The USAF places greater emphasis on technical expertise than the Army. However, that is changing. Army ROTC has taken steps lately to provide engineering and science undergraduate cadets preference in branch selection. Based on what I have heard from recently commissioned 2LTs, if you are an engineering major you could literally move up 1/6th of the way higher on the National OML.
      Last edited by Polo08816; June 19th, 2012, 04:08 PM.

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      • #18
        Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

        Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
        You are probably older (and wiser) than our youngsters (like me) today. It was a different environment 20 years ago. There are still plenty of very competent technicians (non management track) working at Fortune 500 companies that do not actually have degrees making 6 figures or more per year. I would not discount or write these guys off one bit for lacking a degree.

        The IT field is more hands on and there's definitely a lot of on-the-job training involved. In fact, you could even make the argument that you could self-study all the skills, syntax, and concepts to become a software developer.

        Unfortunately the Bachelor's of Science (and maybe even a Master's of Science) has become the new high school diploma in today's market.

        Interestingly enough, Yahoo! News has an article that claims a MS Computer Engineering degree may not be worth it.

        http://finance.yahoo.com/news/5-grad...070045929.html


        I'm not saying they are 100% right, but they make an interesting argument.
        I am only 28, but you're right about how the market use to be and how it is now. I would say I am part of a minority today. Very lucky.

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        • #19
          Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

          Originally posted by SteveLord View Post
          I am only 28, but you're right about how the market use to be and how it is now. I would say I am part of a minority today. Very lucky.
          +1. You're younger than I thought.

          Originally posted by ParalegalNCO1 View Post
          Majors like History, Criminal Justice, Womens Studies, and almost anything in the Arts is not helpful in gaining employment.
          Last edited by RyCass; June 19th, 2012, 08:59 PM. Reason: Deleted image: profanity

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          • #20
            Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

            Like Steve stated, looking for a job is a job in and of itelf... Like a lot of people in the forum here, I work in the IT world, but am Infantry in the military. I have found that the military background provides a lot of soft-skills that high school and young college grads lack - focus, motivation, leadership and management, not to forget people skills and team experience. That said, I have two bachelors degrees, and neither are in IT; they do give me a leg-up when I am in competition against those who do not have advanced education - as for the IT I have a lot of varied experience over the last decade and a half (that and having a security clearance helps in many respects).

            And just as one cannot rest on his or her laurals at the end of the day, everything is dynamic in many fields - that includes constant changes and standards. Right now I have am trying to work a Comptia cert for A+ which is a new minimum requirement for a lot of governement contacts and positions, whereas I have been operating as a network engineer previously at a higher level. Lack of certifications has now really hit me hard, so I either sink or swim by updating my skills with certs I did not take time to do in the past. Many career fields have similar requirements beyond simple experience - such as project management for example.

            If you have a security clearance, there are a couple of really good site that focus on positions that have clearance requirements (as well some recruiting and head-hunter agencies).

            If anyone wants to/can help me with info and mentoring on what to do for the A+, I would be appreciative - keep in mind; networking between peers is always a great way to gain info and contacts - I have even recommended peers for civilian jobs (and yes they did get hired based on my rec). And yeah, I could use the help
            Last edited by LRSU_Dog; June 19th, 2012, 06:22 PM.

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            • #21
              Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

              Well for myself I am majoring in Accounting and Finance but I am wondering how is the job market for someone with a degree in Russian? Any thoughts?

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              • #22
                Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

                Originally posted by LRSU_Dog View Post
                If anyone wants to/can help me with info and mentoring on what to do for the A+, I would be appreciative - keep in mind; networking between peers is always a great way to gain info and contacts - I have even recommended peers for civilian jobs (and yes they did get hired based on my rec). And yeah, I could use the help
                I too have been in IT for 10+ Years I have a Diploma in Law and no IT Degrees, only certifications such as MCSE 2003, A+ and Server+ sometimes I wonder if I should get an IT related degree or just continue getting certifications, I have been eyeing VM Ware as well as upgrading my MCSE.

                I have an ok IT job but I wouldn't call it a career as there seems to be no room for upward mobility in this organisation so I am planning on using the NY State Guard educational benefits to advance myself (if I can make heads or tails of it).

                My Job in the Guard will be 91B... I couldn't get TS because I am a green card holder, you might be correct a TS can help in advancing an IT career.

                Regarding the A+ if you have been doing IT a while now then consider the A+ as a refresher course, you will get into some old technology that you will be hard pressed to find operating in the real world today all in all its not that difficult, I would recommend focusing on test preparation materials then analyse the results and brush up on weak areas. I think I have a CD that came with a book I bought I could give you an ISO send me a PM if needed, or I will be able to answer specific questions before I ship on 20120905.

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                • #23
                  Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

                  Originally posted by LRSU_Dog View Post

                  And just as one cannot rest on his or her laurals at the end of the day, everything is dynamic in many fields - that includes constant changes and standards. Right now I have am trying to work a Comptia cert for A+ which is a new minimum requirement for a lot of governement contacts and positions, whereas I have been operating as a network engineer previously at a higher level. Lack of certifications has now really hit me hard, so I either sink or swim by updating my skills with certs I did not take time to do in the past. Many career fields have similar requirements beyond simple experience - such as project management for example.

                  If you have a security clearance, there are a couple of really good site that focus on positions that have clearance requirements (as well some recruiting and head-hunter agencies).

                  If anyone wants to/can help me with info and mentoring on what to do for the A+, I would be appreciative - keep in mind; networking between peers is always a great way to gain info and contacts - I have even recommended peers for civilian jobs (and yes they did get hired based on my rec). And yeah, I could use the help
                  LRSU Dog, if you like, you can PM me so I can you some good training docs for certification which falls under DOD Directive 8570
                  http://www.giac.org/certifications/dodd-8570

                  If you do not have an IT background; I will recommend you focus on Comptia's Security + instead of A+ since you just need one exam to take versus A+'s two. Skillport website has the courses there you will need for training. You can always enroll on the Fort Gordon's LandWarNet website to get the latest 25B series training which should give you a basic understanding of computer hardware.

                  I am Signal with a TS and been doing IT since 1987 so I have a lot of software that has good training material. Unfortunately, Comptia changed its requirements that you will have to re-certify every three years. Mine are lifetime since I did it before the change date. I have CCNA and MCSA as well.

                  Times have changed because in the 90s; I got good IT jobs with just my military background with no certs or degrees. Now to compete; it behooves you to get those certs.

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                  • #24
                    Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

                    Originally posted by fmcityslicker View Post
                    LRSU Dog, if you like, you can PM me so I can you some good training docs for certification which falls under DOD Directive 8570
                    http://www.giac.org/certifications/dodd-8570

                    If you do not have an IT background; I will recommend you focus on Comptia's Security + instead of A+ since you just need one exam to take versus A+'s two. Skillport website has the courses there you will need for training. You can always enroll on the Fort Gordon's LandWarNet website to get the latest 25B series training which should give you a basic understanding of computer hardware.

                    I am Signal with a TS and been doing IT since 1987 so I have a lot of software that has good training material. Unfortunately, Comptia changed its requirements that you will have to re-certify every three years. Mine are lifetime since I did it before the change date. I have CCNA and MCSA as well.

                    Times have changed because in the 90s; I got good IT jobs with just my military background with no certs or degrees. Now to compete; it behooves you to get those certs.
                    +1 on fmcityslicker said.

                    To survive in the IT world, you need to be able to continually learn and add to your skillset. The industry evolves at an extremely rapid rate and adding certifications shows to your future employers that you are trainable and can adapt to a changing environment. I can't tell you which certifications you will need because the scope of IT is so wide.


                    I work in product development as a software engineer at a smaller telecom that specializes in government contracts. I can tell you a few things we value:

                    Necessary:
                    -C (if you are a strong C coder, you can pick up C++ quickly)
                    -SQL (solid understanding of relational databases)

                    Good to have:
                    -Java
                    -CCNP or higher (solid understanding of networking and network engineering)
                    -Scripting (used for setup, installation, configuration)

                    What would really set you apart:
                    -Assembly

                    Technically, these are all skills that you could self-learn without needing a degree. There are enough tutorials and open source development communities out there to get involved with to develop yourself.

                    In the field of software engineering, your best coders can be 100x more productive than the average coder. Very few other fields can realize that magnitude of variance in productivity.
                    Last edited by Polo08816; June 24th, 2012, 07:37 PM.

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