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  • Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

    I thought a thread about locating a job would benefit the Guard forum users. Something came in the mail the other day called Hero 2 Hired.

    www.h2h.jobs

    I don't know how effective it is but they have a nice website and someone may find their advice helpful. I know this is probably the biggest obstacle guardsmen face.

    What helped you find work while being in the guard? Success stories welcome.

  • #2
    Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

    What helped me was looking every day. My job was looking for a job. I had a spreadsheet with dozens of jobs I had applied for, name of position, pay, responses from employer, etc. Sadly, many do not go to this length and expect a job to find them. Or they rely on staffing/recruiting agencies to do the work for them. You'd be surprised at how many people use only Monster and Careerbuilder. Many to this day still do not realize that even Craigslist houses many jobs.

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    • #3
      Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

      Originally posted by SteveLord View Post
      Many to this day still do not realize that even Craigslist houses many jobs.
      Ehh I wouldn't put to much faith in Craigslist. From what I have seen on that site all you can find are **** jobs at best.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

        Originally posted by o13starsnstripes View Post
        Ehh I wouldn't put to much faith in Craigslist. From what I have seen on that site all you can find are **** jobs at best.
        For one, CL is much cheaper and easier for employers to post there. And two, that attitude is what keeps people on unemployment checks for months or years. And three, there ARE jobs from every industry and every kind of pay scale. Even military recruiters post on there.

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        • #5
          Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

          Originally posted by SteveLord View Post
          For one, CL is much cheaper and easier for employers to post there. And two, that attitude is what keeps people on unemployment checks for months or years. And three, there ARE jobs from every industry and every kind of pay scale. Even military recruiters post on there.
          How do you think I found my Officer job!?!!?!?! lol

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

            Originally posted by SteveLord View Post
            For one, CL is much cheaper and easier for employers to post there. And two, that attitude is what keeps people on unemployment checks for months or years. And three, there ARE jobs from every industry and every kind of pay scale. Even military recruiters post on there.
            Yup you get what you pay for that for sure. I'm not saying I haven't checked it myself but all I'm saying is that there are usually just c r a p jobs that are on it. Yeah thats true which brings me to a question why in these economic depression times we are living in why would a recruiter still post an ad online to get people in? I just don't get it

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            • #7
              Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

              Originally posted by o13starsnstripes View Post
              Ehh I wouldn't put to much faith in Craigslist. From what I have seen on that site all you can find are **** jobs at best.
              I got my current job on craigslist.... IT field

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              • #8
                Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

                Originally posted by dutchpatrick View Post
                I got my current job on craigslist.... IT field
                Is it a c r a p job? Lol

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

                  Originally posted by Chaplain4me View Post
                  I thought a thread about locating a job would benefit the Guard forum users. Something came in the mail the other day called Hero 2 Hired.

                  www.h2h.jobs

                  I don't know how effective it is but they have a nice website and someone may find their advice helpful. I know this is probably the biggest obstacle guardsmen face.

                  What helped you find work while being in the guard? Success stories welcome.
                  They are predominately the same things that would help you find work if you were not in the Guard.

                  Two things that helped me find work:
                  1. Majoring in Computer Science. (95%)
                  2. Having a Secret Clearance. (5%)

                  I am now working as a software engineer at a telecom whose clients are predominantly government agencies. It was the first job that I interviewed for and I was hired the next day. In my free time, I've been focusing more on network engineering.

                  From what I understand, major telecoms are always seeking network engineers with strong software engineering/development backgrounds. If you have a Secret or higher level security clearance, it helps but its certainly not a substitute for having a technical expertise such as engineering or computer science.
                  Last edited by Polo08816; June 19th, 2012, 12:14 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

                    Originally posted by Chaplain4me View Post
                    What helped you find work while being in the guard? Success stories welcome.
                    The same things I would have done had I been a civilian. Going to the best college I could possibly get into and getting the highest grades I could achieve in a technical field while taking electives that diversified my skillset. Making the most of every intermediate position I held in order to learn as much as possible while securing solid recommendations from superiors for future applications. Keeping my personal finances in order so as to not starve to death in the event that I was unable to find employment.

                    On my resume, my military service is listed briefly at the bottom and it mentions my current responsibilities as an XO, as well as my experience in Iraq as both an officer and an enlisted soldier. That's about it. It's a nice "oh, by the way" and it's written in a way such that it's obvious I'm selling myself primarily on my skillset rather than on my military service, which (in a material sense) is totally irrelevant to my civilian job.

                    The single best thing a young soldier can do to ensure that he's able to find work is use the education benefits to major in something that requires actual learning. Engineering, computer science, and mathematics (in the case of math, minoring in finance or economics is an excellent choice) are solid picks. A good litmus test is asking yourself, "at the completion of this program of study, what skills will I possess that I do not currently have?" A "skill" being something like performing a stress/strain analysis, solving a differential equation, or writing a modular block of code. Written communication is important, but I can guarantee you that no matter how many papers you write in a philosophy program there will always be plenty of guys with degrees in electrical engineering who can write just as competently. Make sure you are acquiring skills that the guy next to you isn't likely to have, and don't count on your DD214 to get you a job.

                    I may be harsh, but I'll never lie to you.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

                      Originally posted by jwarren View Post
                      The same things I would have done had I been a civilian. Going to the best college I could possibly get into and getting the highest grades I could achieve in a technical field while taking electives that diversified my skillset. Making the most of every intermediate position I held in order to learn as much as possible while securing solid recommendations from superiors for future applications. Keeping my personal finances in order so as to not starve to death in the event that I was unable to find employment.

                      On my resume, my military service is listed briefly at the bottom and it mentions my current responsibilities as an XO, as well as my experience in Iraq as both an officer and an enlisted soldier. That's about it. It's a nice "oh, by the way" and it's written in a way such that it's obvious I'm selling myself primarily on my skillset rather than on my military service, which (in a material sense) is totally irrelevant to my civilian job.

                      The single best thing a young soldier can do to ensure that he's able to find work is use the education benefits to major in something that requires actual learning. Engineering, computer science, and mathematics (in the case of math, minoring in finance or economics is an excellent choice) are solid picks. A good litmus test is asking yourself, "at the completion of this program of study, what skills will I possess that I do not currently have?" A "skill" being something like performing a stress/strain analysis, solving a differential equation, or writing a modular block of code. Written communication is important, but I can guarantee you that no matter how many papers you write in a philosophy program there will always be plenty of guys with degrees in electrical engineering who can write just as competently. Make sure you are acquiring skills that the guy next to you isn't likely to have, and don't count on your DD214 to get you a job.

                      I may be harsh, but I'll never lie to you.
                      +1000

                      Majors like History, Criminal Justice, Womens Studies, and almost anything in the Arts is not helpful in gaining employment.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

                        Anyone attending college needs to try and obtain relevant experience in what it is they want to do at the same time. There is still some kind of expectation from these kids graduating today, that they are suppose to be walking into $60k+ jobs right from the isle, with no experience.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

                          Originally posted by ParalegalNCO1 View Post
                          +1000

                          Majors like History, Criminal Justice, Womens Studies, and almost anything in the Arts is not helpful in gaining employment.
                          +1

                          But.. but... you should major in what you like or may enjoy! (sarcasm)

                          Reality: We are adults and need to be responsible for our own decisions. Sometime what we like to do is different from what me must do. If majoring in a technical field versus majoring in a useless major means the difference between being gainfully employed and a guaranteed EBT card, then one must make the prudent choice.

                          Originally posted by SteveLord View Post
                          Anyone attending college needs to try and obtain relevant experience in what it is they want to do at the same time. There is still some kind of expectation from these kids graduating today, that they are suppose to be walking into $60k+ jobs right from the isle, with no experience.
                          Agreed. Students need to put in effort to find an internship or part-time job in order to gain relevant experience. Believe it or not, there are also engineering/computer science majors that failed to do this and they encountered difficulty in finding a well-paying job post graduation.



                          Here is an example of a psychotic individual who has plenty of degrees. 29 degrees I believe: http://gma.yahoo.com/michigan-man-29...opstories.html

                          "I just stayed in school and took menial jobs to pay for the education and just made a point of getting more degrees and eventually I retired so that I could go full-time to school," Nicholson told ABCNews.com.
                          Last edited by Polo08816; June 19th, 2012, 09:46 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

                            I am an IT guy with no degree, but a solid job. However, I still encourage higher education as I keep track of what the job market wants today, which is the most important thing to know. I have no sympathy for these kids on the news whining when many of them most likely spent most of their college time partying. Or they pursued degrees in markets with little demand.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Finding Work as a Guard Soldier

                              Originally posted by SteveLord View Post
                              I am an IT guy with no degree, but a solid job. However, I still encourage higher education as I keep track of what the job market wants today, which is the most important thing to know. I have no sympathy for these kids on the news whining when many of them most likely spent most of their college time partying. Or they pursued degrees in markets with little demand.
                              You are probably older (and wiser) than our youngsters (like me) today. It was a different environment 20 years ago. There are still plenty of very competent technicians (non management track) working at Fortune 500 companies that do not actually have degrees making 6 figures or more per year. I would not discount or write these guys off one bit for lacking a degree.

                              The IT field is more hands on and there's definitely a lot of on-the-job training involved. In fact, you could even make the argument that you could self-study all the skills, syntax, and concepts to become a software developer.

                              Unfortunately the Bachelor's of Science (and maybe even a Master's of Science) has become the new high school diploma in today's market.

                              Interestingly enough, Yahoo! News has an article that claims a MS Computer Engineering degree may not be worth it.

                              http://finance.yahoo.com/news/5-grad...070045929.html

                              Computer engineering
                              Computer engineering is a booming industry for job growth. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that the market for software developers will grow by 30 percent between 2010 and 2020. Computer programmer jobs are growing at a 12 percent pace, which is about average. However, in most cases, there is little benefit for job seekers who go beyond a bachelor's degree in the field.

                              The Georgetown study saw just a 16 percent boost in pay for students with graduate degrees in computer engineering.

                              Paul Silvio, senior vice president at Modis, a large information technology recruiting firm, confirms that his client base doesn't place a high priority on graduate education. "The vast majority of jobs in IT are hands-on, where employees are utilizing a specific technology or skill set," he says. "Candidates grow their expertise by growing their skill sets and interpersonal skills," he says, rather than pursuing further academic qualifications.
                              I'm not saying they are 100% right, but they make an interesting argument.

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