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  • #31
    Re: Specialty schools

    Originally posted by matthew.ritchie View Post
    Until you can substantiate this claim with something more than a feeling that you and your friends share, it would be irresponsible to broadcast it.
    I respectfully disagree. It has been my observation that in the NJARNG it takes about six years (from commission) to make Captain. I have gotten the impression that in other states (as well as the USAR) that it takes significantly less time; very often around four years. In the absence of a database of promotion statistics for the various states and components (unless such a thing exists and is publicly accessible), how can you contend that it's inappropriate for soldiers to relate their experiences?

    Furthermore, the anecdotal nature of the "evidence" for these claims is implicit in the fact that they appear on an internet message board rather than being found in official channels. Suggesting that we not discuss the realistic timelines for promotion due to the lack of hard numbers is akin to telling a young soldier that he can't describe his combat experiences because he doesn't have a spreadsheet of compiled statistics detailing each engagement.

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: Specialty schools

      Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
      I'm not so sure about this, but joining the USAR certainly will get you promoted faster.
      Originally posted by NY ARNG Woodard View Post
      Why is that?
      Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
      From what I understand, it's how they cross-level their soldiers. Also, you can fill vacant slots in a larger geographical area compared to a NG soldier who has to compete for a slot within their state unless they IST to another state.
      Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
      After using State Tuition Waiver for a BS Computer Science, (possibly) MS Computer Science and (possibly) a JD - part time, NJ will have outlived its usefulness. Hopefully I can devote some time to brush up on my Chinese (Mandarin) and test out on the DLPT.

      I should be a senior CPT at that point if all goes well. Couple this with no funding for schools in the future, the belief that I would fare better in a more centralized promotion system like the USAR, and the typical faster promotion in the USAR makes the USAR the only viable option or just get out altogether. The only thing that would entice me to stay in the ARNG is minimum time in grade promotions.
      Originally posted by matthew.ritchie View Post
      The USAR also has a force structure one third smaller than the Guard's, and fewer types of units. Also, if you got offered a promotion in a unit 1000 miles for home, would you consider that helpful?

      You never miss an opportunity to tell the forum how the USAR promotes people fast than the Guard, although I have yet to see your evidence for that assertion.
      Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
      Comparing the USAR region to strictly my state, it would seem as if the USAR is larger. You can't compare to the "entire" Guard. There are no surrounding states that are so understrength they would put a 1LT(P) right into a company command slot never mind the admin inconveniences and delays of an IST.

      If you could be part of the NJ ARNG for just a month, you would have all the evidence you need. Ask EOrsini, showstopper_999, jwarren, etc. as they are all current members of the NJ ARNG. It has been a generally accepted consensus that USAR promotes faster than NJ ARNG. We all know marginally rated officers that went (1LT) NJ ARNG -> IRR -> USAR (CPT) faster than their superior peers. We also see the USAR units on Ft. Dix with 2LTs as XOs and 1LTs as company commanders.

      Perhaps VA ARNG is just better than NJ ARNG all around?
      Originally posted by matthew.ritchie View Post
      You tell me not to compare the entire Guard to the entire USAR, but that is exactly what you have done several times.



      "Data" is not the plural of "anecdote." You've made a serious claim several times on the basis of very little evidence.


      I won't make that claim based on a single incident.

      Have you considered that you've misinterpreted the data completely? If one restaurant is mobbed, and another restaurant next door has no one in it, which one do you think is the better restaurant? Perhaps the claim (uncorroborated at this point) that USAR has so many vacancies should be a warning and not an enticement.

      The point is not that the NJ Guard or the USAR is a good or bad organization, but that you've made a bold claim based on very limited evidence. Readers of this forum may make career decisions in part based on what you have written, and they deserve better than this. Until you can substantiate this claim with something more than a feeling that you and your friends share, it would be irresponsible to broadcast it.
      Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
      Sure, the grass may not be greener on the other side, but by that time it doesn't matter. By the time I fulfill my obligation (6 years), I would have been able to get all that I needed out of the Guard. I'm not a careerist and I don't mind getting out if things aren't what I expected. The USAR is not perfect, and the NJ ARNG less so.



      Clearly, I disagree with you on whether what I have said is "substantiated" or a "feeling". I don't think that's going to change. I have seen what I have seen and base my decisions on what is actually happening here versus what someone thinks is happening in my state from 3 states away. It's a simply a personal experience. I believe what I have said has merit because it is a pattern based on what I have seen and I completely stand by it.
      Originally posted by EOrsini View Post
      I am not agreeing or disagreeing with what you are saying... But I do think the grass is always greener. I thought about switch to the reserves, but when I spoke to a LTC in the reserves, he informed me that where I was and what I was doing was a better experience than switching. He was up front and basically ordered me to stay where I am. Even after saying they needed officers and could give me command time. Bottom line is don't always go looking for what you THINK is the best thing... You may be perfect where you are at.

      NO organization anywhere in the world is perfect. As officers, we need to be the solution. I'm not drinking the kool-aid here, or blowing smoke up anyones *****... but I will say that if I feel something is jacked up, I'm speaking up to my Commander, or at the very least, ensuring that my platoon does it the right way. 40 Soldiers doing the right thing is still 40 Soldiers doing the right thing. When we get promoted to General, then we can change everything. Till then, change what you can, when you can
      Originally posted by jwarren View Post
      I respectfully disagree. It has been my observation that in the NJARNG it takes about six years (from commission) to make Captain. I have gotten the impression that in other states (as well as the USAR) that it takes significantly less time; very often around four years. In the absence of a database of promotion statistics for the various states and components (unless such a thing exists and is publicly accessible), how can you contend that it's inappropriate for soldiers to relate their experiences?

      Furthermore, the anecdotal nature of the "evidence" for these claims is implicit in the fact that they appear on an internet message board rather than being found in official channels. Suggesting that we not discuss the realistic timelines for promotion due to the lack of hard numbers is akin to telling a young soldier that he can't describe his combat experiences because he doesn't have a spreadsheet of compiled statistics detailing each engagement.
      What do these replies have to do with the original thread and question?

      Please get back on topic.

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: Specialty schools

        Hunter,

        This is a good topic and I am sure educational to at least a few people. Perhaps we can split it off into it's own thread. I will see what I can do with it tonight if no one else beats me to it.

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: Specialty schools

          Originally posted by Mongoose772 View Post
          When people use the term specialty schools in this context it typically means "a badge producing school". For the record badge/tab producing schools are only a tiny fraction of the non-branch/MOS producing schools found within the Army and the greater military service.

          Women can earn nearly all of the badges and tabs in the army "inventory". This would include all the Aviator badges (Pilot, Aircrew, Flight Surgeon, Astronaut), Explosive Ordinance Disposal Badge, Parachutist Badge (Airborne), Pathfinder Badge, Air Assault Badge, Military Freefall Parachutist Badge (HALO), Parachute Rigger Badge, the Engineer SAPPER tab, the Drill Sergeant Identification Badge, the Recruiting Badges, the Career Counselor (Retention) Badge, the rare Guard of Tomb of the Unknown Soldier badge, and the diving badges! The only ones I can think of that women are currently not eligible to obtain due to Federal Combat Exclusion laws are the Special Forces Identification Tab, the Expert Infantry Badge (you have to be infantry or SF to take the exam), and the Ranger Tab.

          A week ago the Army came out with this interesting news article: http://www.chicagotribune.com/sns-rt...0,443822.story

          If the article has validity apparently there is consideration to allow women to attend Ranger School.

          Other badges such as marksmanship and drivers badges are also earned by women, and the combat related badges with the exception of the Combat Infantryman Badge are authorized to women.

          So the bottom line is women can earn nearly ALL the badges in the Army inventory. Unfortunately, just getting a good PT score isn't what gives soldiers the opportunity to attend the associated schools. Most of the schools are job/unit dependent. Although Airborne and Air Assault school is sometimes used as a "reward" for exceptional performance.
          Well I realize this thread is WAY OLD and got WAY off topic but I found it and I was wondering how women rate a spot to ilitary Freefall Parachutist Badge (HALO)...isn't that reserved for SF?? What other MOS's rate a spot to MFF?

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: Specialty schools

            Originally posted by ajdeployed12 View Post
            Well I realize this thread is WAY OLD and got WAY off topic but I found it and I was wondering how women rate a spot to ilitary Freefall Parachutist Badge (HALO)...isn't that reserved for SF?? What other MOS's rate a spot to MFF?
            My guess would be that they may come from the QM branch.

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: Specialty schools

              Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
              My guess would be that they may come from the QM branch.
              +1. Parachute Riggers.

              However, don't expect to see any NG soldier to ever get a slot unless he is in a SFG.

              Regular infantry could get a slot as well along with other MOS if they belong to a Pathfider company, LRS company, or a scout/sniper platoon. But again, you wont see NG guys getting any slots for MFF.

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: Specialty schools

                OK, thanks for the info.

                However, don't expect to see any NG soldier to ever get a slot unless he is in a SFG.

                I was hoping LOL....Doesn't SF need EOD attachments ?

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: Specialty schools

                  Now, I'm not an expert on SFG force structure by any means but I don't think that EOD techs are attached at the SFG level. As in assigned on the MTOE and UMR. They can be attached when a mission calls for it but that would typically take place in theater. Is an Army EOD tech going to jump with an ODA from 30,000 ft? No. Consider EOD attachments to SFG in the same light as a wheeled or track mechanic attachments to SFG.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: Specialty schools

                    Originally posted by ajdeployed12 View Post
                    OK, thanks for the info.

                    However, don't expect to see any NG soldier to ever get a slot unless he is in a SFG.

                    I was hoping LOL....Doesn't SF need EOD attachments ?
                    Devil dog, realize the Guard is state first. It is not tue same as active duty. You going back to old stuff and equipment.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: Specialty schools

                      Originally posted by fmcityslicker View Post
                      Devil dog, realize the Guard is state first. It is not tue same as active duty. You going back to old stuff and equipment.
                      Hey I can dream! I am used to disappointment, the military doesn't feel right without it! But isn't the gear the Marine Corps gets the National Guard's old gear? You know, the little brother to the little brother, lol.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: Specialty schools

                        Originally posted by ajdeployed12 View Post
                        Well I realize this thread is WAY OLD and got WAY off topic but I found it and I was wondering how women rate a spot to ilitary Freefall Parachutist Badge (HALO)...isn't that reserved for SF?? What other MOS's rate a spot to MFF?
                        Below are the prerequisites for attendance to Military Free Fall (MFF) parachutist course:

                        Army Active Component or Reserve Component Special Operations Forces Commissioned Officers (LT-CPT), Warrant Officers (WO1-CW3) or enlisted personnel (PFC-MSG), assigned to or on orders for assignment to a military free fall coded position.

                        Requests for exceptions to the above must be endorsed in writing by the first O-5 commander in the chain of command.
                        Must be a qualified military static line parachutist. Must have a current Class III flight physical examination IAW AR 40-501 dated within two years of course completion date. Must report with a current Physiological Training Record, High-Altitude Parachutist Initial (HAP INT) (AF Form 1274; AF Form 702, Navy Form 1550/28-NP-6 card; or USAAMC AA Form 484.)
                        Personnel cannot exceed 240 pounds.
                        Any variation from the above standards requires a waiver from the Commanding General, USAJFKSWCS.

                        So, in short the only NG soldiers that will ever get the chance to request and attend MFF, are current NG SF, LRS team members that are on MFF status and Parachute Riggers that are directly supporting those types of units.

                        SF rarely needs the assistance of EOD. SF Engineer Sgt. (18C) have all the training required to disarm and blow most UXOs they come across.

                        Comment

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