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Article that defends military pension cuts and combat deployment stats

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  • Article that defends military pension cuts and combat deployment stats

    Interesting info.

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinio...bates/4280837/

    http://nation.time.com/2012/03/16/co...lanced-burden/

  • #2
    Interesting that 40% of the Army has never deployed even once. Here I thought I was significantly behind the curve with only 2 deployments. As for the military pension cuts, I agree with the first article that it is a very generous system. However, I think cuts need to be made all around and not just the military. Can we talk about the salaries and pensions of congressmen and their lackeys I mean aides?

    Comment


    • #3
      Well, I laugh that our retirement is so generous when there are many civil servants in law enforcement and fire fighter careers that receive much more of a generous package. I know cops that are retiring with six-figure pensions. Only 18% of the total military force makes it to a 20-year career. I been doing this on and off since 83 and still have not completed 20 full years to get my pension and I am near 50. Right now, I am eligible for a NG/AR type of pension and that seems far off if I was leaving the service this year. Thank God I am in a career field that has prospects on the civilian side.

      We went from a society that use to receive good pensions after 20 years of work (e.g. IBM) and then everything went down the wayside with bogus 401K programs that are not enough to provide (only supplement) or pension-paying programs that were ripped off by unions. With 401K, you have to do it immediately when you are young and pay handsomely straight for 20 years and more to have something decent by time you are 65 (if the markets do not lose your money).

      Welfare needs to be overhauled, better monitored to prevent constant fraudulent abuse. Also, perhaps a major raise in the minimum wage will be a better idea; if it will decrease welfare and food stamp benefits. There are much less on military pensions than on welfare benefits. Government always takes away from the ones they should not.

      BTW, I do not mind the cuts, if overall; they leave military pensions alone and refrain from that ludicrous retirement overhaul mentality in which only a TSP will be the sole option for retirement or you serve 20 active and do not receive a pension until you are 60.
      Last edited by Chief Kemosabe; January 4th, 2014, 02:24 PM.

      Comment


      • realitycheck
        realitycheck commented
        Editing a comment
        You can't take an irregular service retirement (NG/AR type of pension) if you are presently in the Regular Army.

    • #4
      I agree completely on overhauling the welfare system. I do not agree with a substantial increase in minimum wage though. I am not a fan of the governments ever increasing size and ability to redistribute wealth.



      Comment


      • #5
        I know that RC. But I was told 6 years ago that is I had over 20 years of service (not all AD) that I could transfer to the IRR and then put in my retirement paperwork from there. Nevertheless, that did not happen because I was selected for Warrant and the rest is history.

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        • #6
          Originally posted by Explosive Hazard
          Interesting that 40% of the Army has never deployed even once. Here I thought I was significantly behind the curve with only 2 deployments. As for the military pension cuts, I agree with the first article that it is a very generous system. However, I think cuts need to be made all around and not just the military. Can we talk about the salaries and pensions of congressmen and their lackeys I mean aides?
          The article is from 2012 based on a 2010 graph that's probably based on 2009/2008 numbers that really don't explain anything. It would mean something if it broke it out how many of those Soldiers had been in by years. That graph could easily be pulling in those still in BCT/AIT.

          Is the retirement generous? How many employers can call you back involuntarily? For most, forced out at 20-22 years as the result of RCP?

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