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  • Read before you enlist.

    This post is for some of you indubitably hard-headed, inexperienced, short-tempered 'young adults' that think enlisting in the Armed Forces is like going to college or will play out like an episode of "Beverly Hills 90210." As some of you may already know, my daughter tried enlisting in the Air National Guard. Who cares? Just sit there and learn.

    My daughter is just like her mother--She's a typical woman--already overly sensitive and has a tendency to be vindictive, she also has this emotional state of shut-down followed by a brief fit of rage if she feels she's losing an argument or knows she's not going to get what she wants. This may be okay for a grown woman that works and pays bills but no good for young people.

    Anyways, I can't just tell my daughter to shut the hell up, sit down and listen. She'll throw a damn fit like a fool, suffer the consequences, and apologize later. So, she goes to an Air Force recruiter for enlistment. Don't get me wrong--she's very bright, fit, and capable but she didn't finish her degree and she has a kid. Should I tell her not to enlist? Noooooo. She'll throw a fit and I'll become the low-down, dirty dad. So, I buy her an ASVAB study guide,and tell her to STUDY the math portion. Long story short, the recruiter messes her around and she changes her mind.

    Next step: She decides to go Navy--an even worse choice. You can't take your children on a ship. Had to have a retired Navy uncle tell her it's a bad idea. Next--Getting fed up with all this foolishness I point her in the right direction of a National Guard recruiter—Here I am asking her repeatedly how many college credits she has and what her GT score was so she could go 09S. Repeatedly she drags her feet—Bad sign.

    Now, of course she didn’t want daddy coming along with her to the recruiters office—Bad idea. I went to the recruiter on my own. Long story short—not only does she not have 90 credits she only has a GT score of 106—“I know. I didn’t study” She says. Knowing my daughter and knowing the recruiter I let the recruiter tell her I paid a visit. She threw a fit in so many words in a text she sent me and her mother saying she decided not to enlist, “you went behind my back”, blah, blah, blah.

    What would have happened if she had gone through with rushing into enlisting so she could get into BCT? She would have rushed to retake the ASVAB, gotten another bumb score because, again, she wouldn’t have studied, she would be stuck in an MOS she didn’t want, and she would be discouraged from wanting to finish her degree. This is not even to mention the fact that she hasn’t exercised regularly in months.

    Would she have listened if I told her to hold off on enlisting altogether and finish her degree in the first place? No. Enlisting in the Armed Forces only to find out later that you haven’t completely thought the process out nor have you prepared yourself physically and mentally is a recipe for failure—period. No recruiter is going to sit there and tell you not to enlist especially if you are a good candidate for enlistment. Enlisting in the Armed Forces is not a place to ‘learn your lesson the hard way’.

  • #2
    Re: Read before you enlist.

    Originally posted by VICEROY06 View Post
    This post is for some of you indubitably hard-headed, inexperienced, short-tempered 'young adults' that think enlisting in the Armed Forces is like going to college or will play out like an episode of "Beverly Hills 90210." As some of you may already know, my daughter tried enlisting in the Air National Guard. Who cares? Just sit there and learn.

    My daughter is just like her mother--She's a typical woman--already overly sensitive and has a tendency to be vindictive, she also has this emotional state of shut-down followed by a brief fit of rage if she feels she's losing an argument or knows she's not going to get what she wants. This may be okay for a grown woman that works and pays bills but no good for young people.

    Anyways, I can't just tell my daughter to shut the hell up, sit down and listen. She'll throw a damn fit like a fool, suffer the consequences, and apologize later. So, she goes to an Air Force recruiter for enlistment. Don't get me wrong--she's very bright, fit, and capable but she didn't finish her degree and she has a kid. Should I tell her not to enlist? Noooooo. She'll throw a fit and I'll become the low-down, dirty dad. So, I buy her an ASVAB study guide,and tell her to STUDY the math portion. Long story short, the recruiter messes her around and she changes her mind.

    Next step: She decides to go Navy--an even worse choice. You can't take your children on a ship. Had to have a retired Navy uncle tell her it's a bad idea. Next--Getting fed up with all this foolishness I point her in the right direction of a National Guard recruiter—Here I am asking her repeatedly how many college credits she has and what her GT score was so she could go 09S. Repeatedly she drags her feet—Bad sign.

    Now, of course she didn’t want daddy coming along with her to the recruiters office—Bad idea. I went to the recruiter on my own. Long story short—not only does she not have 90 credits she only has a GT score of 106—“I know. I didn’t study” She says. Knowing my daughter and knowing the recruiter I let the recruiter tell her I paid a visit. She threw a fit in so many words in a text she sent me and her mother saying she decided not to enlist, “you went behind my back”, blah, blah, blah.

    What would have happened if she had gone through with rushing into enlisting so she could get into BCT? She would have rushed to retake the ASVAB, gotten another bumb score because, again, she wouldn’t have studied, she would be stuck in an MOS she didn’t want, and she would be discouraged from wanting to finish her degree. This is not even to mention the fact that she hasn’t exercised regularly in months.

    Would she have listened if I told her to hold off on enlisting altogether and finish her degree in the first place? No. Enlisting in the Armed Forces only to find out later that you haven’t completely thought the process out nor have you prepared yourself physically and mentally is a recipe for failure—period. No recruiter is going to sit there and tell you not to enlist especially if you are a good candidate for enlistment. Enlisting in the Armed Forces is not a place to ‘learn your lesson the hard way’.
    Oh VICEROY.....this is all you needed to put, the rest is for Dr. Phil.. You'll have lost most kids' attention by the time you 'accuse' them of being 'inexperienced'.. (just ribbing you...)
    Last edited by Chris36; May 21st, 2013, 12:08 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Read before you enlist.

      Originally posted by Chris36 View Post
      Oh VICEROY.....this is all you needed to put, the rest is for Dr. Phil.. You'll have lost most kids' attention by the time you 'accuse' them of being 'inexperienced'.. (just ribbing you...)
      This was more of a stress releasing exercise--For me.

      I got about 2 hours of sleep last night restraining myself from going to her house.

      It was either write this micro-dissertation or show up at my daughter's job and kick her ass. Ungreatful twirp.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Read before you enlist.

        Originally posted by VICEROY06 View Post
        This post is for some of you indubitably hard-headed, inexperienced, short-tempered 'young adults' that think enlisting in the Armed Forces is like going to college or will play out like an episode of "Beverly Hills 90210." As some of you may already know, my daughter tried enlisting in the Air National Guard. Who cares? Just sit there and learn.

        My daughter is just like her mother--She's a typical woman--already overly sensitive and has a tendency to be vindictive, she also has this emotional state of shut-down followed by a brief fit of rage if she feels she's losing an argument or knows she's not going to get what she wants. This may be okay for a grown woman that works and pays bills but no good for young people.

        Anyways, I can't just tell my daughter to shut the hell up, sit down and listen. She'll throw a damn fit like a fool, suffer the consequences, and apologize later. So, she goes to an Air Force recruiter for enlistment. Don't get me wrong--she's very bright, fit, and capable but she didn't finish her degree and she has a kid. Should I tell her not to enlist? Noooooo. She'll throw a fit and I'll become the low-down, dirty dad. So, I buy her an ASVAB study guide,and tell her to STUDY the math portion. Long story short, the recruiter messes her around and she changes her mind.

        Next step: She decides to go Navy--an even worse choice. You can't take your children on a ship. Had to have a retired Navy uncle tell her it's a bad idea. Next--Getting fed up with all this foolishness I point her in the right direction of a National Guard recruiter—Here I am asking her repeatedly how many college credits she has and what her GT score was so she could go 09S. Repeatedly she drags her feet—Bad sign.

        Now, of course she didn’t want daddy coming along with her to the recruiters office—Bad idea. I went to the recruiter on my own. Long story short—not only does she not have 90 credits she only has a GT score of 106—“I know. I didn’t study” She says. Knowing my daughter and knowing the recruiter I let the recruiter tell her I paid a visit. She threw a fit in so many words in a text she sent me and her mother saying she decided not to enlist, “you went behind my back”, blah, blah, blah.

        What would have happened if she had gone through with rushing into enlisting so she could get into BCT? She would have rushed to retake the ASVAB, gotten another bumb score because, again, she wouldn’t have studied, she would be stuck in an MOS she didn’t want, and she would be discouraged from wanting to finish her degree. This is not even to mention the fact that she hasn’t exercised regularly in months.

        Would she have listened if I told her to hold off on enlisting altogether and finish her degree in the first place? No. Enlisting in the Armed Forces only to find out later that you haven’t completely thought the process out nor have you prepared yourself physically and mentally is a recipe for failure—period. No recruiter is going to sit there and tell you not to enlist especially if you are a good candidate for enlistment. Enlisting in the Armed Forces is not a place to ‘learn your lesson the hard way’.
        Just a point of order, the GT score is an issue but you only need 60 credits to begin the OCS program. It's 90 credits to accept your commission. The expectation is that someone who goes the Traditional route, as your daughter likely would have being NPS, would be able to complete those additional credits in the ~ 15 months of the Traditional program.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Read before you enlist.

          Just wanted to add (not related to the OP's story) that the Guard is NOT a welfare or charity organization. We have all seen too many threads from people seeking a fulltime job, childcare, health treatments, dental treatments, help buying a car, a house, up front cash in the form of a bonus, etc.

          Any perks and benefits earned or offered come in exchange for no less than 8 years of your life at least being partially controlled by the government.

          It is getting a little ridiculous lately.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Read before you enlist.

            I never thought I'd say it but Viceroy just made me glad all my kids are under 10.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Read before you enlist.

              Originally posted by SteveLord View Post
              Just wanted to add (not related to the OP's story) that the Guard is NOT a welfare or charity organization. We have all seen too many threads from people seeking a fulltime job, childcare, health treatments, dental treatments, help buying a car, a house, up front cash in the form of a bonus, etc.

              Any perks and benefits earned or offered come in exchange for no less than 8 years of your life at least being partially controlled by the government.

              It is getting a little ridiculous lately.
              Excellent post. The state of the economy, an entitlement mindset, youth and ignorance are causing these outrageous pursuits. Hopefully, the outlook will change for all and people can come to the Guard for SELFLESS-SERVICE again.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Read before you enlist.

                Originally posted by SteveLord View Post
                Just wanted to add (not related to the OP's story) that the Guard is NOT a welfare or charity organization. We have all seen too many threads from people seeking a fulltime job, childcare, health treatments, dental treatments, help buying a car, a house, up front cash in the form of a bonus, etc.
                Originally posted by SteveLord View Post

                Any perks and benefits earned or offered come in exchange for no less than 8 years of your life at least being partially controlled by the government.

                It is getting a little ridiculous lately.


                Excellent post. The state of the economy, an entitlement mindset, youth and ignorance are causing these outrageous pursuits. Hopefully, the outlook will change for all and people can come to the Guard for SELFLESS-SERVICE again.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Read before you enlist.

                  Originally posted by SteveLord View Post
                  Just wanted to add (not related to the OP's story) that the Guard is NOT a welfare or charity organization. We have all seen too many threads from people seeking a fulltime job, childcare, health treatments, dental treatments, help buying a car, a house, up front cash in the form of a bonus, etc.

                  Any perks and benefits earned or offered come in exchange for no less than 8 years of your life at least being partially controlled by the government.

                  It is getting a little ridiculous lately.
                  I've noticed that as well.

                  The mindset is apparently that we can't get troops in and that joining the Army (and NG) is a viable backup plan for just about anyone... This may have been the case in the 80's and 90's (up to 9/11) but people need to realize that we not recruiting "problems" at the moment.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Read before you enlist.

                    Originally posted by SteveLord View Post
                    Just wanted to add (not related to the OP's story) that the Guard is NOT a welfare or charity organization. We have all seen too many threads from people seeking a fulltime job, childcare, health treatments, dental treatments, help buying a car, a house, up front cash in the form of a bonus, etc.

                    Any perks and benefits earned or offered come in exchange for no less than 8 years of your life at least being partially controlled by the government.

                    It is getting a little ridiculous lately.
                    Yes, this is directly related. And I share everyone else's sentiment on this issue. It's gotten to the point where people don't even understand what the National Guard's purpose is anymore. And I fault it moreso on--The National Guard. Too many incentive ads and commercials promising 'the world' to these people. We're not even citizen soldiers anymore. Now we're "Soldiers of Steel".

                    What in the HELL is that!?!?!?!??!!?!?!?!??!?!?!?!

                    Next thing you know Taco Bell will be passing out National Guard T-Shirts and hats.

                    "Hey, I just committed mass murder. Can I join?"

                    Or "Hey, the IRS has been chasing across 5 states. Can I still join?"

                    The brand is digressing back to pre 9/11 standards.

                    It's even to the point where I run into people not only on this discussion board but IN PERSON with the gall to be upset because they weren't accepted with a friggin' matchbook certificate from some back alley, online university. Or waddling around all fat and disgusting--can't walk a friggin' block without having a massive stroke. And got the gall to have attitude.

                    I wonder how many fat losers waltz up in a Marine recruiter's office thinking they can 'cut the mustard' with high cholesterol, a prison record, and an addiction to meth?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Read before you enlist.

                      Originally posted by eqmcclure View Post
                      Just a point of order, the GT score is an issue but you only need 60 credits to begin the OCS program. It's 90 credits to accept your commission. The expectation is that someone who goes the Traditional route, as your daughter likely would have being NPS, would be able to complete those additional credits in the ~ 15 months of the Traditional program.
                      I would rather she had 90 credits--I'd rather she be completely through with her degree. But it's a foregone conclusion anyway, at least for now. She only has 53 college credits. A true goal for her would be to transfer her credits (she has an associates as a dental assistant) to her college and get a degree in biology or something. Apply to a dental program and go AMEDD. This is what is killing me--yes, she is that bright. She has the ability to be an Army dentist. But she has to drop that garbage attitude and stop dragging her feet, worrying about hair and clothes. Stop worrying about making more money right now and make a long-term plan.
                      Last edited by VICEROY06; May 21st, 2013, 04:57 PM. Reason: I never say "heck" or "dang".

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Read before you enlist.

                        To this day my wife regrets not listening to her dad on two key points. Not going to his alma matar(sic) (Cornell) and not trying for Air force for its AMEDD program.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Read before you enlist.

                          I'm an example of that. Kind of rushed into it, not knowing the full blown story. I bit into that Marine Corps uniform is the nicest bla bla bla thing....Well, sometimes you just learn things the hard way. And for that, you may end up paying for it in the long run. But its not the end of the world either. People make mistakes and move on. Things play out the way they do because nobody has a crystal ball. What 18 year old high school kid knows about legislation and benefits and eligibility and the contracts are written by lawyers. They are so far out removed from those kind of things. I had the misfortune of not really knowing what I wanted to do, others are focused in elementary school. Not me. Looking back on it, I never petered out of my contract and fulfilled my obligation with an honorable discharge regardless of my mos or training. If I could have changed a few things, I probably would have but I can think of much worse scenarios than mine. At least I never ended up in Fort Levenworth or a brig with a dishonorable discharge. Sounds like you've done your best in trying to get your child on the right track, but the rest is up to her. Good luck.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Read before you enlist.

                            Originally posted by marinecomm View Post
                            I'm an example of that. Kind of rushed into it, not knowing the full blown story. I bit into that Marine Corps uniform is the nicest bla bla bla thing....Well, sometimes you just learn things the hard way. And for that, you may end up paying for it in the long run. But its not the end of the world either. People make mistakes and move on. Things play out the way they do because nobody has a crystal ball. What 18 year old high school kid knows about legislation and benefits and eligibility and the contracts are written by lawyers. They are so far out removed from those kind of things. I had the misfortune of not really knowing what I wanted to do, others are focused in elementary school. Not me. Looking back on it, I never petered out of my contract and fulfilled my obligation with an honorable discharge regardless of my mos or training. If I could have changed a few things, I probably would have but I can think of much worse scenarios than mine. At least I never ended up in Fort Levenworth or a brig with a dishonorable discharge. Sounds like you've done your best in trying to get your child on the right track, but the rest is up to her. Good luck.
                            I understand where you're coming from. But my focus isn't necessarily on young people without guidance as it is on young people that have people who can guide them yet choose to be hard-headed and do their own thing. It's one thing to make a decision to enlist on your own with no one there to guide you. It's another thing to have an experienced parent that KNOWS the ins and outs but you don't want to listen out of stubbornness and stupidity.

                            Back in the day I had a different experience. I was rebellious and self-destructive but I wasn't defiant and disrespectful. I listened to guidance if it was given. Problem is, I didn't get any guidance. I knew then back in the eighties that if I had enlisted then I probably would have been discharged for failure to adapt. I already knew where my mind was and I wasn't about to waste anyone's time and money to find out what I had already known. Even then, if I had anyone in my life that had served in the Armed Forces I would have been more confident in making a more informed decision.

                            I'm currently living a successful life, so I have no regrets. Nevertheless, I enlisted in my 40's--I'm essentially doing the same thing I could have done over 20 years ago. My PT score would have been a lot higher but in the end I have the will, ability, and experience to accomplish a lifelong goal.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Read before you enlist.

                              Originally posted by Bmac View Post
                              To this day my wife regrets not listening to her dad on two key points. Not going to his alma matar(sic) (Cornell) and not trying for Air force for its AMEDD program.
                              Same here. My wife has regrets. She's in her 50's and she's in better shape than women half her age. When we work out she can keep up with me 80% of the time--and I don't play around in the gym. I'm talking wide open cross-training, free weights, etc.

                              Comment

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