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Choosing MOS

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  • Choosing MOS

    I was wondering, is it ok to wait to get the mos desired? I know the recruiters are working hard to help us future recruits to enlist. But what if, when it's time to choose a MOS, the few choices you have in mind are not available? Is it ok to wait to enlist?

  • #2
    What would you rather do: spend 6 years doing a job you had to settle for or make your a recruiter who you will never see again upset?

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    • #3
      You are welcome to wait, although this entails other risks. Perhaps you hurt yourself, or do something that makes you inelligible for enlistment. That's not likely, particularly if you manage your life well. Additionally, you may have a timeline for other life events that will change based on your enlistment date. You really don't want to start school or a new job and then leave for Basic and AIT, so waiting might cost you in other ways. These are considerations for you to weigh in your situation, and determine what is most important to you and where you are willing to assume risk

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      • #4
        Thank you for your replies! I am fortunate enough to be able to come and go as I want with my job. And keeping in shape is a everyday thing for me. "It is not a great day until I workout". It doesn't matter how long I have to wait to get what I want then. I was worry to be wrong by not accepting a mos available at this time. Thank you again!

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        • #5
          It depends on what MOS you're holding out for. If it's a realistic MOS and one you qualify for, no problem. If you're holding out for the one 68X, X-Ray Tech or 21M, Firefighter MOS in the State then you're never going to join.

          Also, concerning SPIRITSRHIGH comment about the Recruiter never seeing them again, I find a bit offensive. This isn't Active Duty where once you ship you're not coming back for some time & likely won't interract with the Recruiter again. I still maintain contact with soldiers I've enlisted over five years ago. Also, I see every one of my soldiers when they return from training and do my best to provide guidance throughout their military career.

          Not all Recruiters are just about a number.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by NYGuardRecruiter View Post

            Also, concerning SPIRITSRHIGH comment about the Recruiter never seeing them again, I find a bit offensive. This isn't Active Duty where once you ship you're not coming back for some time & likely won't interract with the Recruiter again. I still maintain contact with soldiers I've enlisted over five years ago. Also, I see every one of my soldiers when they return from training and do my best to provide guidance throughout their military career.

            Not all Recruiters are just about a number.
            +1 My recruiter got transferred to my unit a month or two after I reported out of OCS and I see him just about every drill now. He's a good guy and a good resource to have.

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            • #7
              I agree that SPIRT's comments are not objectively helpful. You have to make that cost benefit analysis like NYG suggested. What are your primary goals to enlistment? The particular job, the benefits, the desire to serve, the paid travel? Some geographic locations simply do not have dozens of choices. By way of interest, what's avalible?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by NYGuardRecruiter View Post
                It depends on what MOS you're holding out for. If it's a realistic MOS and one you qualify for, no problem. If you're holding out for the one 68X, X-Ray Tech or 21M, Firefighter MOS in the State then you're never going to join.

                Also, concerning SPIRITSRHIGH comment about the Recruiter never seeing them again, I find a bit offensive. This isn't Active Duty where once you ship you're not coming back for some time & likely won't interract with the Recruiter again. I still maintain contact with soldiers I've enlisted over five years ago. Also, I see every one of my soldiers when they return from training and do my best to provide guidance throughout their military career.

                Not all Recruiters are just about a number.
                Well good on you, my recruiter was the opposite. I was most certainly just a number and I was one of those guys that settled when I should have waited it out. Fortunately for me I was able to reclass a few years later before my initial contract was up. The OP may or may not have a "good" recruiter by your or my standards but one thing is for sure, when it comes to the OP's future he has to do what is right for him and if he hurts a recruiters feelings oh well. I'm sure the recruiter will be over it by the time he has a new hot lead.

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                • #9
                  Well, I want a MOS in the 68. 68P is my first choice. The only one available in my area is 68w and that is not what I want. I am ready to travel if necessary... to a certain limit.

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                  • matthew.ritchie
                    matthew.ritchie commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Have you discussed with your recruiter your plans and goals? The 68P MOS is a very, very small career field, and you might not be the only applicant holding out for it. If there's two slots in the State, it could be years before one becomes available. Additionally, some of those low-density MOS have just as many (sometimes more) higher-graded positions than they do entry-level. Thus, a Soldier could enter in a related field, and reclass in a few years to that other MOS in a higher grade.

                    Since this is the National Guard, whatever MOS you have won't necessarily be your life. If radiology is your passion, then consider taking some other MOS (even something completely unrelated such as Infantry or Artillery), and use tuition assistance to go to civilian school to become a civilian radiology technician. Yes, serving as an Army radiology tech would support your civilian radiology career, but it's hardly necessary.

                    I fear that you could wait for years for an opportunity when you could have reached the same goal by a different path.
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