Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Two broad questions and an introduction.

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: Two broad questions and an introduction.

    now it disappeared

    Just like my advice on MOS, I can say, "well pick one that has a marketable equal to the civilian sector", compared to dissuading those that want to go into the combat arms. Many go into those jobs regardless, because that is what they feel will bring them honor and happiness.

    Same with college studies. If someone wants to go into a major that is not so lucrative after college then so be it. If there was no demand in those majors and courses, the school will remove them such as what happened to me in UMUC-Europe. The master's MIS program (yes, that relates to IT) was losing its appeal and less students were taking it, causing less classes to be offered. I was told/suggested by my adviser that it may put a dent in my graduation timeline and that I should transfer to the MS-IT program in which I did. In doing that, two classes were not transferable and now I am graduating this year instead of last (which it still increased my time for a master's).

    Now with my years in law enforcement as a Border Patrol Agent and MP (NYPD was calling me to get in their academy class in 2003), I did not have that academic background in criminal justice but I do not knock it. If the OP wants the pursue it; so be it. I rather have him become a lawyer ; even many with law degrees do not pursue a career in law.

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Two broad questions and an introduction.

      Originally posted by Chief Kemosabe View Post
      now it disappeared

      Just like my advice on MOS, I can say, "well pick one that has a marketable equal to the civilian sector", compared to dissuading those that want to go into the combat arms. Many go into those jobs regardless, because that is what they feel will bring them honor and happiness.

      Same with college studies. If someone wants to go into a major that is not so lucrative after college then so be it. If there was no demand in those majors and courses, the school will remove them such as what happened to me in UMUC-Europe. The master's MIS program (yes, that relates to IT) was losing its appeal and less students were taking it, causing less classes to be offered. I was told/suggested by my adviser that it may put a dent in my graduation timeline and that I should transfer to the MS-IT program in which I did. In doing that, two classes were not transferable and now I am graduating this year instead of last (which it still increased my time for a master's).

      Now with my years in law enforcement as a Border Patrol Agent and MP (NYPD was calling me to get in their academy class in 2003), I did not have that academic background in criminal justice but I do not knock it. If the OP wants the pursue it; so be it. I rather have him become a lawyer ; even many with law degrees do not pursue a career in law.
      It's there! I've just approved it.

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Two broad questions and an introduction.

        Originally posted by RyCass View Post
        It's there! I've just approved it.
        Mine wasn't approved yet.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Two broad questions and an introduction.

          Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
          Mine wasn't approved yet.
          It's not in the que...

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Two broad questions and an introduction.

            Originally posted by RyCass View Post
            It's not in the que...
            Someone censored it. I even posted a reply requesting that my post to be approved. Heck I saw jwarren posting a similar request. Both those posts were taken down.

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Two broad questions and an introduction.

              Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
              Someone censored it. I even posted a reply requesting that my post to be approved. Heck I saw jwarren posting a similar request. Both those posts were taken down.
              That it why I now use notepad first. I cannot waste a good train of thought. Haha

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Two broad questions and an introduction.

                I didn't post anything inflammatory. What I posted were the results of the search that Redleg suggested I do. Here's the short version: they don't support his claims, and CJ is still one of the worst possible majors.
                Last edited by Jersey Dirtbag; January 22nd, 2013, 10:39 AM.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Two broad questions and an introduction.

                  Originally posted by Chief Kemosabe View Post
                  Just like my advice on MOS, I can say, "well pick one that has a marketable equal to the civilian sector", compared to dissuading those that want to go into the combat arms. Many go into those jobs regardless, because that is what they feel will bring them honor and happiness.

                  Same with college studies. If someone wants to go into a major that is not so lucrative after college then so be it. If there was no demand in those majors and courses, the school will remove them such as what happened to me in UMUC-Europe. The master's MIS program (yes, that relates to IT) was losing its appeal and less students were taking it, causing less classes to be offered. I was told/suggested by my adviser that it may put a dent in my graduation timeline and that I should transfer to the MS-IT program in which I did. In doing that, two classes were not transferable and now I am graduating this year instead of last (which it still increased my time for a master's).

                  Now with my years in law enforcement as a Border Patrol Agent and MP (NYPD was calling me to get in their academy class in 2003), I did not have that academic background in criminal justice but I do not knock it. If the OP wants the pursue it; so be it. I rather have him become a lawyer ; even many with law degrees do not pursue a career in law.
                  Going to a good school, majoring in the right field, and completing valuable internships is a more important determinant in future economic success than having any particular entry-level MOS. The rationale behind choosing combat arms is that you already have the former squared away and you want the leadership experience that is afforded in a combat arms branch.

                  The second part is not necessarily true. In the end, it's about profit. Engineering grad school is not as profitable as law school for the institution. With engineering grad school, there comes infrastructure costs such as labs. The expenditures per graduate student is much higher than law school. Law schools do not have much more facility costs other than large lecture halls. Even if they had a 25% enrollment decrease, they still may be more profitable than an engineering grad school because their costs are so low relative to engineering. Thus, they will continue to deceive prospective students into enrolling in their substandard programs.
                  Last edited by Polo08816; January 22nd, 2013, 10:49 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Two broad questions and an introduction.

                    Ive come to learn that if you just hit "reply to thread" and opposed to replying with quotes the posts will go right through. For whatever reason the reply with quotes triggers the snag.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Two broad questions and an introduction.

                      Originally posted by ParalegalNCO1 View Post
                      Ive come to learn that if you just hit "reply to thread" and opposed to replying with quotes the posts will go right through. For whatever reason the reply with quotes triggers the snag.
                      Still doesn't explain how our posts were deleted out of the queue to be moderated. Big brother is at work on this forum. Truth hurts (even when it's completely non-hostile).

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: Two broad questions and an introduction.

                        We have been having some technical difficulties with long threads being thrown into the Moderators Que. We suspect what Paralegal suggests is what is happening. Sorry for the inconvenience. If your post is not being validated within a reasonable time frame, shoot a PM to one of the Mods. Thanks!

                        Also, if you have posted a long post, please let me know before posting it again because I've been deleting duplicates (hence why Chief saw his post just disappear).
                        Last edited by RyCass; January 22nd, 2013, 10:53 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Two broad questions and an introduction.

                          Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
                          Going to a good school, majoring in the right field, and completing valuable internships is a more important determinant in future economic success than having any particular entry-level MOS. The rationale behind choosing combat arms is that you already have the former squared away and you want the leadership experience that is afforded in a combat arms branch.

                          The second part is not necessarily true. In the end, it's about profit. Engineering grad school is not as profitable as law school for the institution. With engineering grad school, there comes infrastructure costs such as labs. The expenditures per graduate student is much higher than law school. Law schools do not have much more facility costs other than large lecture halls. Even if they had a 25% enrollment decrease, they still may be more profitable than an engineering grad school because their costs are so low relative to engineering. Thus, they will continue to deceive prospective students into enrolling in their substandard programs.
                          You make great points. I just feel from experience that a person is more apt to do well in his studies if he is pursuing something that interests him. I tried accounting and electrical engineering for their career/financial potential and it slammed me. Granted, that is not the case for everyone, but we all know that we push with something that truly interests us.

                          And many combat arms leaders alumni still cannot lead horses to water.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Two broad questions and an introduction.

                            I just did a reply to quote in response to Polo. Now awaiting mod approval.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: Two broad questions and an introduction.

                              Originally posted by Chief Kemosabe View Post
                              I just did a reply to quote in response to Polo. Now awaiting mod approval.
                              Done.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: Two broad questions and an introduction.

                                Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
                                The second part is not necessarily true. In the end, it's about profit. Engineering grad school is not as profitable as law school for the institution. With engineering grad school, there comes infrastructure costs such as labs. The expenditures per graduate student is much higher than law school. Law schools do not have much more facility costs other than large lecture halls. Even if they had a 25% enrollment decrease, they still may be more profitable than an engineering grad school because their costs are so low relative to engineering. Thus, they will continue to deceive prospective students into enrolling in their substandard programs.
                                Not necessarily true. There's a reason why most PhD programs in engineering come with full funding, and that reason is grants. Institutions compete for research grant money and one of the determining factors is the quality of the publications coming out of the school, which is largely a function of the quality of their graduate students.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X