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  • #16
    Re: Where to go to join for MP field

    Since there is two questions and I’ve done both, I’ll answer.

    Frist, there’s nothing wrong with a CJ degree. Keep in mind Law Enforcement means far more than police but includes corrections offices and probation/parole officers and at all levels. If you’re not looking at a federal job, then a CJ degree is probably your best bet as they will require a CJ degree or closely related field, ie sociology or physiology. To say stay away from CJ as all you can do is CJ is like saying to a nurse don’t go for a nursing degree as all you’ll be able to do is nursing.

    As far as schools, I’d steer away from strictly online schools (ITT or University of Phoenix). Most legitimate schools, a CJ degree is really a sociology degree with an emphasis on the history of law enforcement.

    If you’re looking for a federal job, then study the agency you’re looking at. They can vary wildly and can depend on how you test with those agencies. I’d also look for forums geared towards LE as they can give you far better advice.

    I’d agree with you getting a language, as it will help in your job. I wouldn’t count on it unless you can speak if fluently.

    Second, MP’s. Think light cavalry. Law enforcement is becoming a distant memory to the MP corps, especially in the NG.

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Where to go to join for MP field

      Originally posted by RedLeg View Post
      Frist, there’s nothing wrong with a CJ degree. Keep in mind Law Enforcement means far more than police but includes corrections offices and probation/parole officers and at all levels. If you’re not looking at a federal job, then a CJ degree is probably your best bet as they will require a CJ degree or closely related field, ie sociology or physiology. To say stay away from CJ as all you can do is CJ is like saying to a nurse don’t go for a nursing degree as all you’ll be able to do is nursing.
      This is just one non-federal organization, but the NJSP does not require a CJ degree. I would be very surprised if other departments have such a requirement, as I am not aware of such a thing. And how exactly is physiology related to criminal justice?

      Secondly, your analogy is pretty weak because a nursing degree requires learning actual skills. You can actually do something that you couldn't do before after having earned a BSN. Can the same be said for a BCJ?

      Originally posted by RedLeg View Post
      Second, MP’s. Think light cavalry. Law enforcement is becoming a distant memory to the MP corps, especially in the NG.
      Maybe in Iraq in 2004. What I saw in 2008-2009 was MPs being corrections officers and traffic cops; nothing more. Then again, that was just my personal experience.

      That said, the MP chain of command I dealt with (my Bn was assigned to an MP BDE) was probably the worst organization I have ever dealt with. The concept of delegating responsibilities and giving subordinates reasonable leeway in the accomplishment of their respective missions simply had no meaning to them. Our brigade commander, a Brigadier General, would literally spell out the NUMBER OF SOLDIERS who had to be at a particular guard post at any given time. This is not the sort of careful and detailed planning that superiors owe their subordinates; it's micromanagement on crack. It was horrible and it made me seriously consider resigning my commission less than two years after having earned it.

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Where to go to join for MP field

        Originally posted by jwarren View Post
        This is just one non-federal organization, but the NJSP does not require a CJ degree. I would be very surprised if other departments have such a requirement, as I am not aware of such a thing. And how exactly is physiology related to criminal justice?

        Secondly, your analogy is pretty weak because a nursing degree requires learning actual skills. You can actually do something that you couldn't do before after having earned a BSN. Can the same be said for a BCJ?



        Maybe in Iraq in 2004. What I saw in 2008-2009 was MPs being corrections officers and traffic cops; nothing more. Then again, that was just my personal experience.

        That said, the MP chain of command I dealt with (my Bn was assigned to an MP BDE) was probably the worst organization I have ever dealt with. The concept of delegating responsibilities and giving subordinates reasonable leeway in the accomplishment of their respective missions simply had no meaning to them. Our brigade commander, a Brigadier General, would literally spell out the NUMBER OF SOLDIERS who had to be at a particular guard post at any given time. This is not the sort of careful and detailed planning that superiors owe their subordinates; it's micromanagement on crack. It was horrible and it made me seriously consider resigning my commission less than two years after having earned it.
        Unless you work in the field, why are you chiming in? The NJSP isn’t the only law enforcement agency in the US.

        Sorry, I fat fingered physiology for psychology.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Where to go to join for MP field

          Originally posted by RedLeg View Post
          Unless you work in the field, why are you chiming in? The NJSP isn’t the only law enforcement agency in the US.
          I just think it's a bold assertion that the CJ degree is really that beneficial in the field of law enforcement relative to other programs of study, all of which are obviously much more valuable in every single other field. If your statement isn't actually true, then I can't think of any reason for someone to study CJ instead of something more technical.

          Obviously, my sample size of one is...well, rather small. But the NYSP has no such requirement either. Neither does the PASP. I think the burden of proof is on you here.

          Originally posted by RedLeg View Post
          Sorry, I fat fingered physiology for psychology.
          I figured as much. It's late.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Where to go to join for MP field

            Originally posted by RedLeg View Post
            Since there is two questions and I’ve done both, I’ll answer.

            Frist, there’s nothing wrong with a CJ degree. Keep in mind Law Enforcement means far more than police but includes corrections offices and probation/parole officers and at all levels. If you’re not looking at a federal job, then a CJ degree is probably your best bet as they will require a CJ degree or closely related field, ie sociology or physiology. To say stay away from CJ as all you can do is CJ is like saying to a nurse don’t go for a nursing degree as all you’ll be able to do is nursing.

            As far as schools, I’d steer away from strictly online schools (ITT or University of Phoenix). Most legitimate schools, a CJ degree is really a sociology degree with an emphasis on the history of law enforcement.

            If you’re looking for a federal job, then study the agency you’re looking at. They can vary wildly and can depend on how you test with those agencies. I’d also look for forums geared towards LE as they can give you far better advice.

            I’d agree with you getting a language, as it will help in your job. I wouldn’t count on it unless you can speak if fluently.

            Second, MP’s. Think light cavalry. Law enforcement is becoming a distant memory to the MP corps, especially in the NG.
            I just want to put it out there that I'm not trying to sharpshoot. I'm just speaking about the areas that I've done some extensive research or have been involved with so I'll just try to clarify to the best of my ability.


            I have had some experience in the health care field. Before I switched my major to computer science, I was a student of a 6 year accelerated PharmD program from high school and I've worked in a hospital. The nursing analogy is a bit off because the reason students pursue a BSN is to be able to progress into a management position or specialty. The typical RN is not afforded this opportunity.


            I've been following law enforcement hiring/recruitment for a few years and the following represents what I have gathered to the best of my knowledge.

            If you're interested in local, state, corrections, or non-1811 positions, many hire based on a "civil service" system (or "competitive service" system for federal) where everyone who meets the minimum qualifications will be hired based off of a exam and list number. It is essentially a first in first out queue. If they require a degree, they are simply concerned that you have a degree from an accredited institution. There may be a pay increase if you have a graduate degree. Your field of study generally has no bearing on the hiring process; only the fact that you have a degree. The best forums for state specific hiring standards is www.officer.com . In my opinion, the most beneficial degree for local and state law enforcement is a JD.

            Originally posted by RedLeg View Post
            Unless you work in the field, why are you chiming in? The NJSP isn’t the only law enforcement agency in the US.
            You're right in that he NJSP isn't the only law enforcement agency in the US, and I can't say that I am familiar with the recruiting process for more than a few agencies. I've had experience with the NYPD, LASD, and LAPD. None of those departments value a CJ any more than they value an engineering degree for hiring. In fact, they can't since hiring for those agencies are "civil service" based. I know you're probably wondering out of curiosity how I might know about it. Well, during this transition between pharmacy and computer science I was exploring many options. I was open to local, state, and federal law enforcement. As I was able to further research these career paths, I realized that federal law enforcement fit my goals better.

            If you are looking for a 1811 (criminal investigator/special agent) position, then you need to research the particular agency you are interested in. Some federal agencies such as the FBI and US Secret Service (and CIA although they are not law enforcement) fall under "excepted service" which means that they can set their own hiring standards as opposed to those federal entities that fall under "competitive service". The best forum for federal 1811 positions is http://www.911jobforums.com .

            The most selective federal agency is, by far, the FBI when you compare it against other agencies such as the ATF, DEA, HSI, ICE, USDM, etc. It has the most political clout and continues to hire when no other agency hires.

            FBI SPECIAL AGENT ENTRY PROGRAMS
            All applicants for the Special Agent position must first qualify for one of five Special Agent Entry Programs:

            Accounting
            To qualify under the Accounting Entry Program, candidates must:
            Have been certified as a CPA; or
            Possess, at minimum, a four-year degree with a major in Accounting and three years of progressively responsible accounting work in a professional accounting firm or comparable public setting, such as state comptroller or the General Accounting Office.

            Computer Science/Information Technology
            To qualify under the Computer Science/Information Technology Entry Program, you must have a computer or information technology related degree, a degree in Electrical Engineering, a Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) certification, or a Cisco Certified Internetworking Expert (CCIE) certification. Applicants that qualify by virtue of a CCNP or a CCIE certification must also have a BS or BA degree in any discipline.

            Language
            To qualify under the Language Program, you must have a BS or BA degree in any discipline and be proficient in a language that meets the needs of the FBI. Current qualifying languages include Arabic, Chinese (all dialects), Farsi, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Pashtu, Punjabi, Russian, Spanish, Urdu and Vietnamese. Candidates must pass both the listening and reading portions of the Defense Language Proficiency Test (DLPT) and demonstrate a proficiency of three or higher on the Speaking Proficiency Test (SPT) in a critical foreign language.

            Law
            To qualify under the Law Entry Program, candidates must have a JD degree from an accredited law school.

            Diversified
            To qualify under the Diversified Program, you must have a BS or BA degree in any discipline, plus three years of full-time work experience, or an advanced degree accompanied by two years of full-time work experience.
            Diversified is the worst category to apply under because it has the greatest number of applicants and the lowest admit rate. The people who are ultimately offered a Phase II invite under this category are typically people who possess extremely in-demand skillset such as having a MD, etc. These are, by large, not the people who simply have a degree outside of the specified requirements (such as criminal justice).

            The Language track is often underestimated because native speakers frequently fail the DLPT that the FBI administers. You will need a 3/3 to qualify for the language track. However, if you enter under a different (and deemed critical skill) entry track such as CS/IT, you can be award the language skill if you test at 1+ - 2 in just listening for a critical language such as Arabic or Chinese (mandarin). The official FBI website for this (https://www.fbijobs.gov/1112.asp) shows different passing scores for critical languages but I believe that they simply have not updated their webpage to reflect current requirements.

            The FBI even gives preference towards specific MOS/CMFs in regards to their Hostage Rescue Team recruitment (which is considered the premier counter-terrorist law enforcement unit):

            Tactical Experience Requirements.
            To qualify for the Tactical Recruiting Program (TRP), you will need to bring some special skills, talents, and experience. All candidates will be rated based on their experience levels, and the most qualified will be eligible for this program. Each candidate will have the opportunity to summarize tactical training and experience in the Tactical Recruiting Program on-line application, which may be accessed after completing the Special Agent application. Here is a snapshot of those qualifications:

            Military Experience – Army
            Combat Arms experience. Service in Special Forces Group or Ranger Regiment will carry more weight.

            Military Experience – Navy
            Must have served in the Naval Special Warfare Community as a SEAL or Naval Special Warfare Officer.

            Military Experience – Marine Corps
            Combat Arms experience.

            Military Experience – Air Force
            Must have served in Combat Controller, Combat Rescue (Pararescue), or Tactical Air Control Party fields.
            It really does not get more selective than the FBI.


            Originally posted by jwarren View Post
            Maybe in Iraq in 2004. What I saw in 2008-2009 was MPs being corrections officers and traffic cops; nothing more. Then again, that was just my personal experience.

            That said, the MP chain of command I dealt with (my Bn was assigned to an MP BDE) was probably the worst organization I have ever dealt with. The concept of delegating responsibilities and giving subordinates reasonable leeway in the accomplishment of their respective missions simply had no meaning to them. Our brigade commander, a Brigadier General, would literally spell out the NUMBER OF SOLDIERS who had to be at a particular guard post at any given time. This is not the sort of careful and detailed planning that superiors owe their subordinates; it's micromanagement on crack. It was horrible and it made me seriously consider resigning my commission less than two years after having earned it.
            Wasn't this clown the same general that wore a MP band around his arm and expected you to know who he was when he was in his PT uniform? He's fortunate he never went off the FOB. A lot of Joes were talking about an accidental "fragging".
            Last edited by Polo08816; June 26th, 2012, 02:16 AM.

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Where to go to join for MP field

              Originally posted by NY ARNG Woodard View Post
              I think you should look at a major field that you will enjoy, that you feel passionately about. After all, you will be paying a ton of money for it most likely. I understand the opinion that a degree other than CRJ like accounting may be more beneficial on paper, but will it be beneficial to you personally? Only you, the OP, can decide on such a subjective opinion. I have a BA degree with majors in BOTH Criminal Justice AND Homeland and Corporate Security from St. John's University and if I could go back, I would absolutely do it exactly the same. What I learned there is invaluable and incredibly helpful. Could you join an LE agency with any degree? Sure - but you will be more knowledgable about current global CRJ issues, you will have experience in the field before anyone else via internships and hands-on training, and consequently, you will be more likely to be a leader in the field with a CRJ education. I wouldn't trade my CRJ degree for a law degree, MD, Accounting, or any other degree.

              I'm not saying you should major in CRJ - I'm saying you should do something you will love. Don't invest your time and money on a piece of paper, invest it in the education you're going to receive. Find a subject you're passionate about (whether it be chemistry, pharmacy, CRJ, accounting, theology, or whatever) and you will be a good scholar and a happy person. Successful leaders love what they do.
              Originally posted by jwarren View Post
              Let's frame it differently. If you major in CJ, you may be able to find employment in law enforcement. However, if you cannot find employment in law enforcement, you are probably not going to find employment at all. No one except the military and law enforcement agencies sees any value in that degree. If CJ is your passion and you decide to go for it, that's fine -- as long as you do so with an understanding of the limits your chosen program of study places on your ability to find employment when the fun scholarly college days are over.

              The bottom line is that the private sector is not looking for people with CJ degrees. They may be looking for other attributes that an applicant has in addition to a CJ degree, but it is not that degree that will get them hired. However, there are degrees -- again: math, computer science, engineering -- which can literally take you from "zero" to "hero" just because you possess the credential. Sure, study what you love...but know that doing so may come at the risk of working for 12 bucks an hour, while the practical folks are making a decent living and are consequently able to spend all their free time (of which the 12/hr guy has naturally little) doing the things they love.

              And let's get realistic about government jobs. We are running a huge deficit, and there is reason to believe our little house of cards may come crashing down in the next few decades. Guess what that means? Massive cuts in government spending/services and, of course, the jobs of those supplying said services. So it's completely irresponsible at this point to target a career specifically in gov't, and anyone who does so and finds themselves out of a job deserves it. Nothing but the cold, hard truth, man.



              This is a very bold assertion. What exactly are "global CRJ issues" anyway? What is the correlation between knowledge of these issues and likelihood of being hired? I would be surprised if there really was a strong correlation of that sort.

              I do not work in law enforcement, but I imagine just about all the applicants they have to review have some sort of CJ or HS degree. I don't see a compelling argument for studying something that is extremely common in the one, single, solitary field in which it is valued and has absolutely no use outside of that field.
              I agree with both of you but as you can see NY ARNG Woodard has the same views that I have mentioned and is planning HIS life in a similar that I did decades ago.

              Now what may be different from JWarren is saying is true. But to be honest; the many people that I have seen entered the IT field since 1987 (this has been over a 100 including the S6 OIC that I know now); is that their undergraduate education was never in IT. I have known people that have worked in IT with fine arts, construction engineer, physical education, e.g. degrees. I can go to my fraternity site at www.lambda.com and asked all my brothers what was their discipline and what are they doing right now? All I know is one brother who graduated in pharmacy and is a pharmacist.

              Yes, the type of degree should be relevant in the career that you are pursuing but many employers understand that a degree shows one primary thing. That you had the discipline and dedication to complete a college level program.

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Where to go to join for MP field

                Originally posted by Polo08816 View Post
                Those days of AD career officers moving up the ranks quickly are long gone.
                As a larger group yes but there was an officer that is CPT(P) in my unit and he was selected BZ. There pie is still there but much smaller.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Where to go to join for MP field

                  Originally posted by jwarren View Post
                  This is just one non-federal organization, but the NJSP does not require a CJ degree. I would be very surprised if other departments have such a requirement, as I am not aware of such a thing. And how exactly is physiology related to criminal justice?

                  Secondly, your analogy is pretty weak because a nursing degree requires learning actual skills. You can actually do something that you couldn't do before after having earned a BSN. Can the same be said for a BCJ?



                  Maybe in Iraq in 2004. What I saw in 2008-2009 was MPs being corrections officers and traffic cops; nothing more. Then again, that was just my personal experience.

                  That said, the MP chain of command I dealt with (my Bn was assigned to an MP BDE) was probably the worst organization I have ever dealt with. The concept of delegating responsibilities and giving subordinates reasonable leeway in the accomplishment of their respective missions simply had no meaning to them. Our brigade commander, a Brigadier General, would literally spell out the NUMBER OF SOLDIERS who had to be at a particular guard post at any given time. This is not the sort of careful and detailed planning that superiors owe their subordinates; it's micromanagement on crack. It was horrible and it made me seriously consider resigning my commission less than two years after having earned it.
                  Division MPs are still out on patrols training ANP. They supplement the MP platoon that are part of the STB formation. I travel throughout many FOBs in RC-East and I support non-organic MPs (110th MP) and NG Enginer units. Since I use to be both; I engage in conversations on mission. Tactical MPs are still doing what CPT Redleg said. I was an MP in Iraq in 2005-2006 and left the MP Corps in 2008. I still communicate with my brothers and they still doing a lot of that stuff.

                  There is an NG unit that runs our PMO on our FOB and they worry about the garrison issues that been running rampant (alcohol, drugs) and yes; those times, I feel like I am at home station than deployed.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Where to go to join for MP field

                    Everyone, this is a good debate and I am not saying I am right and you are wrong. Everyone brought valid opinions on the table based on observations and experience. And my views on what I have observed and experienced, past and present.

                    Interesting topic.

                    I have dealt with outstanding Eng and MP units and seen the not so good.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Where to go to join for MP field

                      Originally posted by fmcityslicker View Post
                      Division MPs are still out on patrols training ANP. They supplement the MP platoon that are part of the STB formation. I travel throughout many FOBs in RC-East and I support non-organic MPs (110th MP) and NG Enginer units. Since I use to be both; I engage in conversations on mission. Tactical MPs are still doing what CPT Redleg said. I was an MP in Iraq in 2005-2006 and left the MP Corps in 2008. I still communicate with my brothers and they still doing a lot of that stuff.

                      There is an NG unit that runs our PMO on our FOB and they worry about the garrison issues that been running rampant (alcohol, drugs) and yes; those times, I feel like I am at home station than deployed.
                      Fair enough. I was only speaking with regard to my personal experience, which is limited to the two rounds I did in Iraq. My first experience with MPs was very positive, and the second very negative.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: Where to go to join for MP field

                        [/QUOTE]Wow, NY ARNG Woodard. This post is filled with terrible advice. Are you high?[/QUOTE]. No sir, I was not high. My advice is not geared towards landing a job, but rather towards experiencing an education you're passionate about and how it can benefit you when you are already employed in that field. If one is set on landing a job in CRJ, the field is HUGE, and they will find a job (provided they've lived a clean life and aren't terribly unintelligent). Therefore I believe my advice is sound for someone who has a passion for CRJ.

                        And it is true, sir, that they will teach you everything you need to know in the academy, but why limit your knowledge to just that? Perhaps one could bring their outside knowledge to the table and make a positive change to the agency. Again, my argument is not about landing a job in LE, it's about acquiring an education that can make you a leader and a pioneer in the field.

                        And I just want to add this too in case there is any confusion: this is all in good nature, and I always enjoy a good debate. I understand the arguments opposed to mine, but respectfully disagree

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Where to go to join for MP field

                          Originally posted by NY ARNG Woodard View Post
                          No sir, I was not high. My advice is not geared towards landing a job, but rather towards experiencing an education you're passionate about and how it can benefit you when you are already employed in that field. If one is set on landing a job in CRJ, the field is HUGE, and they will find a job (provided they've lived a clean life and aren't terribly unintelligent). Therefore I believe my advice is sound for someone who has a passion for CRJ.

                          And it is true, sir, that they will teach you everything you need to know in the academy, but why limit your knowledge to just that? Perhaps one could bring their outside knowledge to the table and make a positive change to the agency. Again, my argument is not about landing a job in LE, it's about acquiring an education that can make you a leader and a pioneer in the field.

                          And I just want to add this too in case there is any confusion: this is all in good nature, and I always enjoy a good debate. I understand the arguments opposed to mine, but respectfully disagree
                          You don't have to respectfully disagree. I was unnecessarily harsh.

                          I don't disagree with your points. I agree someone should study something they are truly passionate about. However, I simply believe that being employable takes precedence to personal interests. Don't get me wrong; I find criminal justice absolutely fascinating. News articles relevant to criminal justice catch my eye the most!

                          To that end, there's always the possibility to double major. You could get the best of both worlds. The criminal justice major, in most of its forms, isn't a credit intensive major and should not be too much more difficult than a major such as Economics. In my case, I double majored in computer science and economics.
                          Last edited by Polo08816; July 9th, 2012, 12:46 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Where to go to join for MP field

                            My degree (if you can call it that) is a BA in Liberal Studies..why?

                            1) My civilian and guard position require a degree.. a piece of paper
                            2) I have so many credits across so many fields (computer programming, naval engineering, social science) that it's the only field that took all of that mess and gave birth to a degree.


                            My advice? Skip criminal justice. With all the debate going on, I can tell you that personally when I hire someone for the positions in my office that fall under the law enforcement career field but aren't law enforcement positions (Think physical security inspector, anti terrorism officer, etc), a criminal justice degree gets you nothing more than someone with any other degree. They get upset and raise the issue and we or I inform them that unless they are applying for a badge holding law enforcing position it means nothing and even then it's going to depend on the hiring official if they value that more than a degree in economics.

                            I can also tell you that I cannot count the number of times that I've tried to pull strings where I work and get someone hired (outside my office and careerfield) into the Army Civilian intern program (all internships were done away with under the current administration so we renamed it, but I cant remember the name. Same program though), which at the post I work is one of the few still somewhat actively hiring and I get shot down because the person doesnt have eight business classes, or they want a hard science degree.

                            Sure, get a degree in what youre passionate about but if that's liberal studies or a soft science, know that your best bet is with jobs that require any degree and you'll be pretty much expected to get a masters to be competitive.

                            Careers that require just any degree tend to have that requirement because its a demonstration (allegedly) that the holder can and has demonstrated at least some potential for critical thinking and reason. The positions that require business or hard science degrees have those requirements because they need someone versed in those type areas.

                            My other half awards contracts for the Army that are 25 million or less (for now) and her requirement was at least a bachelors degree of any major, provided she has at least 24 semester hours in business, accounting or economics with a 3.5 GPA. I certainly am happy that requirement is in place. We waste enough money in the government as it is.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: Where to go to join for MP field

                              With all the debate going on....
                              There's debate by people who don't even work in the field.

                              Here's a job posting for a parole officer:

                              A Bachelor's or Master's degree in behavioral science such as criminology, psychology, social work, sociology, or guidance and counseling and two years of related experience. This experience should include people service skills focused on promoting the welfare of others, improving their day to day life skills and their ability to participate productively in society.
                              And another

                              Must have or be within 3 months of completion, a Bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university, in Social Work, Counseling, Sociology, Psychology, Criminal Justice or Administration of Justice with 0-2 year(s) of progressive work experience in the Community Criminal Justice Field.
                              While these are parole positions, majority of states, parole agents are peace officers.

                              Again, Law Enforcement is more then just police.
                              Last edited by RedLeg; July 10th, 2012, 10:44 AM.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: Where to go to join for MP field

                                Originally posted by NY ARNG Woodard View Post
                                My advice is not geared towards landing a job, but rather towards experiencing an education you're passionate about
                                I know it's been said once, but I have to say it again. THIS leads to the unemployed college graduates with 100K in student loans. Yes, do something you are passionate about, but you should study something that will land you a job.

                                Originally posted by NY ARNG Woodard View Post
                                And it is true, sir, that they will teach you everything you need to know in the academy, but why limit your knowledge to just that? Perhaps one could bring their outside knowledge to the table and make a positive change to the agency.
                                Oh yeah...cause I'm sure the instructors at the academy love it when they hear, "When I was in college geting my criminal justice degree, they said we are supposed to do it this way"

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